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Swift
2014-Nov-07, 06:17 PM
Amazingly detailed image of the protoplanetary disc around HL Tau; one of the first high resolution images from ALMA.

BBC article (http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29932609)

UT article (http://www.universetoday.com/116000/alma-shows-off-baby-pictures-baby-planets-that-is/)

eburacum45
2014-Nov-07, 07:32 PM
Amazing. Each of these early planets will presumably suffer further collisions, and get bigger or be ejected from the system; the end result will be a system with fewer, larger objects.

glappkaeft
2014-Nov-08, 01:06 AM
Ahh, so this was what the astronomer at a talk last week cryptically referred to as "I've heard from a friend working on ALMA that a cool discovery will be announced soon". Very nice and considering that this is still the early days of ALMA what will future bring especially after the SKA it is built...

antoniseb
2014-Nov-08, 11:23 AM
... what will future bring especially after the SKA it is built...
I have great expectations for SKA, but SKA will (initially) work on much longer wavelengths than ALMA, so I wouldn't expect it to give a better view of this planet-forming system than ALMA.

Ross 54
2014-Nov-08, 06:33 PM
The SKA, it's said, will initially work at frequencies of up to 14 GHZ. That's roughly 70 times the maximum wavelength of ALMA. The SKA will reportedly extend over 3000 kilometers, or about 200 times the size of ALMA. Shouldn't this more than compensate for the poorer resolution of the longer wavelengths?

Romanus
2014-Nov-11, 04:23 AM
I've never been terribly interested in proplyds, but that is an amazing image (along with a recently released gallery of disks imaged by HST).

glappkaeft
2014-Nov-13, 04:58 PM
The SKA, it's said, will initially work at frequencies of up to 14 GHZ. That's roughly 70 times the maximum wavelength of ALMA. The SKA will reportedly extend over 3000 kilometers, or about 200 times the size of ALMA. Shouldn't this more than compensate for the poorer resolution of the longer wavelengths?

That is the impression I got from the talk and Wiki supports that. I haven't however found any hard numbers to support it and it probably depends on the configuration used by the observatories and the exact definition of resolution used.

George
2014-Nov-13, 08:58 PM
Am I wrong to say this is the first image of its kind where we see a somewhat resolved disk as opposed to the HST fuzzies? The rings are outstanding.

The wavelengths used for this image shows us what? Is this mid-plane results or surface only?

Amber Robot
2014-Nov-13, 11:05 PM
Am I wrong to say this is the first image of its kind where we see a somewhat resolved disk as opposed to the HST fuzzies? The rings are outstanding.


It depends on how you define "disk". I think that HST has done some very nice images of debris disks, including some with rings.

StupendousMan
2014-Nov-14, 03:00 AM
Both ALMA and other radio arrays have made images of other protoplanetary disks many times in the past. This one just looks nicer.

George
2014-Nov-14, 09:30 PM
It depends on how you define "disk". I think that HST has done some very nice images of debris disks, including some with rings.
The only HST image that stands out nicely is that of Fomalhaut. There was another nice disk image that I recall from ESA(?) of a suspected exoplanet formation body within a void pocket, but a subsequent polarization study suggested the void was not really there, and probably not the exoplanet, IIRC. Are there many others?

George
2014-Nov-14, 09:31 PM
Both ALMA and other radio arrays have made images of other protoplanetary disks many times in the past. This one just looks nicer. A very nice "nicer", right? Are we seeing more of the midplane at these wavelengths?

Amber Robot
2014-Nov-14, 10:31 PM
The only HST image that stands out nicely is that of Fomalhaut. There was another nice disk image that I recall from ESA(?) of a suspected exoplanet formation body within a void pocket, but a subsequent polarization study suggested the void was not really there, and probably not the exoplanet, IIRC. Are there many others?

Some more:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/11/11/dusty_rings_hubble_images_of_debris_around_nearby_ stars.html

George
2014-Nov-15, 03:24 PM
Some more:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2014/11/11/dusty_rings_hubble_images_of_debris_around_nearby_ stars.html
Nice, but different species. Those are debris fields. I am more interested in the more enigmatic proplyds.