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View Full Version : Who is exploring the cosmos today?



selvaarchi
2014-Nov-23, 08:38 AM
An interesting titbit from this article/slides is that USA has had 40 missions to the moon. China has been seen as catching up but so far they have only had 4.

http://m.csmonitor.com/Photo-Galleries/Infographics/Space-race-2014-Who-is-exploring-the-cosmos-today/(photo)/785517

NEOWatcher
2014-Nov-23, 03:51 PM
An interesting titbit from this article/slides is that USA has had 40 missions to the moon. China has been seen as catching up but so far they have only had 4.
As every country is expanding their programs and reaching milestones, everybody is "catching up". Concentrating on one type of mission is not exactly a good metric.



http://m.csmonitor.com/Photo-Galleries/Infographics/Space-race-2014-Who-is-exploring-the-cosmos-today/(photo)/785517
How do we open that page so the pictures are actually big enough to read?

selvaarchi
2014-Nov-23, 03:57 PM
I could not do it either so settled for a magnifying glass :D

selvaarchi
2014-Nov-27, 10:30 AM
When we explore the our solar system we have to extra careful, unless we want to spread earths DNA. This was a surprising byproduct from a study the European scientist were conducting.

http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/24704/20141127/dna-survives-re-entry-into-earths-atmosphere-from-space-on-the-exterior-of-a-rocket.htm


Simple DNA can apparently survive a journey through space. It won't even burn-up during re-entry into Earth's atmosphere and will retain its ability to hold and transfer genetic information.

A team of Swiss and German scientists applied some DNA fragments to the exterior surface of a rocket that zoomed into low Earth orbit during a 13 minute space flight. When the rocket returned to Earth, the scientists were surprised to discover the DNA molecules still intact.

NEOWatcher
2014-Dec-02, 06:26 PM
When we explore the our solar system we have to extra careful, unless we want to spread earths DNA.
That has been a concern for decades. Ever since they thought they detected microbes surviving on Surveyor 3. But, that doesn't diminish the test (nor does the fact that it was only suborbital speeds). After all, it's best that we do have a good understanding of it.

I tried looking for a reference when that was launched. A few weeks ago, the Russians also detected surviving microbes (http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/nov/19/bacteria-russian-sex-satellite-survive-reentry) from the return of the "gecko" satellite.
Possibly an overlap in studies.