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Frost Bite
2014-Dec-20, 07:07 AM
It's thought that the moon has a core temperature of around 2600 degrees fahrenheit and Mars between 5000 and 7000 degrees fahrenheit. Correct?

That would mean there is a zone(very thin for the moon) of ideal temperature consistently, for basic forms of life to form and propagate within that temperature zone, theoretically, wouldn't it?

Can some experts chime in on the subject?

Colin Robinson
2014-Dec-21, 10:15 PM
It's thought that the moon has a core temperature of around 2600 degrees fahrenheit and Mars between 5000 and 7000 degrees fahrenheit. Correct?

That would mean there is a zone(very thin for the moon) of ideal temperature consistently, for basic forms of life to form and propagate within that temperature zone, theoretically, wouldn't it?

Can some experts chime in on the subject?

I'm not an expert, but I'll chime in anyway...

Your reasoning seems to be that if the surface temperature of the Moon is too cold for life, while the core is too hot, then there should be a just-right zone in between... In fact the surface of the Moon is not always too cold for life.... The Moon's surface can at some times and places be very cold, but at others times and places can actually be hotter than boiling water... As you go below the surface, the "too cold" problem should diminish, but the "too hot" problem would presumably increase.

Another important point to consider, is that habitability, even for basic forms of life, depends on other factors as well as temperature. An important one is presence of a liquid solvent (such as water) to facilitate chemical reactions. Water in liquid form is not known to exist anywhere on or in Earth's Moon, although water molecules have been detected there.

In the case of Mars, there is good evidence that liquid water was flowing on its surface a few billion years ago, and aquifers of subsurface water may indeed exist today. Some of the moons of Jupiter and Saturn (Europa, Enceladus, Titan) seem to have large amounts of liquid water subsurface, and Titan has liquids other than water on its surface.

Githyanki
2014-Dec-21, 11:51 PM
The biggest problem for lawki on the Moon is water and atmosphere.

IsaacKuo
2014-Dec-31, 11:02 AM
There are two important factors for liquid water conditions--temperature and pressure. In our solar system, the only planet with the right combination on the surface is Earth. There are numerous planetary bodies with the right combination below the surface, including some with substantial subsurface water lakes/oceans.