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Swift
2015-Jan-06, 03:47 PM
Geonuc gets credit for pointing this one out to me

Geologypage.com (http://www.geologypage.com/2014/02/researchers-discover-epic-new-burgess.html#ixzz3NZuT0pf7)


Yoho National Park's 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale -- home to some of the planet's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative -- is one of the world's most important fossil sites. Now, more than a century after its discovery, a compelling sequel has been unearthed: 42 kilometres away in Kootenay National Park, a new Burgess Shale fossil bed has been located that appears to equal the importance of the original discovery, and may one day even surpass it.

A paper published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications describes Kootenay National Park's new 'Marble Canyon' fossil beds for the first time. The authors suggest that the area and its extraordinary fossils will greatly further our understanding of the sudden explosion of animal life during the Cambrian Period.


...

In a short 15-day field season, the researchers collected thousands of specimens representing more than 50 species, several of which were new to science. Incredibly, many of the species previously known from Yoho are better preserved in Kootenay, retaining very fine, never-before-seen anatomical details that are important for understanding the shape of the animal 'family tree.'

LookingSkyward
2015-Jan-06, 09:53 PM
very cool!

geonuc
2015-Jan-06, 11:38 PM
Yeah, that could be pretty exciting for paleontologists.

Romanus
2015-Jan-08, 12:21 AM
That is really exciting. :)

Swift
2015-Jan-08, 03:21 AM
Pictures! (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140211/ncomms4210/fig_tab/ncomms4210_F3.html#close)

From the article in Nature Communications

And a press release (http://www.rom.on.ca/en/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/rom-researchers-discover-epic-new-burgess-shale-site-in-canadas) with more detail from the Royal Ontario Museum, which was involved with the work.



This new finding is the latest in a recent string of Burgess Shale discoveries, including confirmation that Pikaia, found only in Yoho National Park, is the most primitive known vertebrate and therefore the ancestor of all descendant vertebrates, including humans.

In over 100 years of research, approximately 200 animal species have been identified at the original Burgess Shale discovery in Yoho National Park in over 600 field days. In just 15 days of field collecting, 50 animal species have already been unearthed at the new Kootenay National Park site.

Some species found at the new Kootenay site are also found in China’s famous Chengjiang fossil beds, which are 10 million years older. This contributes to the pool of evidence suggesting that the local and worldwide distribution of Cambrian animals, as well as their longevity, might have been underestimated.

Noclevername
2015-Jan-08, 04:28 AM
Awesome! I can't wait to find out the new details of previously unknown life.

Noclevername
2015-Jan-08, 04:52 AM
Nitpick:
Yoho National Park's 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale -- home to some of the planet's earliest animals, including a very primitive human relative

Technically true but misleading way of putting it. Pikia gracilens is thought to be an ancestor of all living vertebrates. The way it's worded in the article makes it seem like there's a primate in the shale! Probably with a very surprised look on its face: "What am I doing here?" (With respect to Gary Larson, of course.)

iquestor
2015-Jan-08, 12:27 PM
Actually, they recanted the "primitive human relative" finding. turns out it was a really old amateur fossil hound who had fallen asleep after lunch.

jj_0001
2015-Jan-09, 12:38 PM
This is starting to read like Terry Pratchett :)

But I also await new fossil discoveries.

BigDon
2015-Jan-10, 03:30 PM
Yeah, that could be pretty exciting for paleontologists.

That's putting mildly my friend.

My trilobite is even impressed. He's only 430 million years old. The difference being almost twice that of the dinosaurs and us.

Life on Earth is *old*.

Eclogite
2015-Jan-12, 08:02 AM
Nitpick:

Technically true but misleading way of putting it. Pikia gracilens is thought to be an ancestor of all living vertebrates. The way it's worded in the article makes it seem like there's a primate in the shale! Probably with a very surprised look on its face: "What am I doing here?" (With respect to Gary Larson, of course.)You say this is a nitpick, but I think it much more important than that. It is sloppy and misleading journalism. Many bemoan the lack of adequate science education in the "west". This kind of ill considered new reporting feeds the more outlandish notions of those with some interest in science, but no real knowledge of it. You were right to point it out.

galacsi
2015-Jan-12, 09:39 AM
Pictures! (http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140211/ncomms4210/fig_tab/ncomms4210_F3.html#close)

From the article in Nature Communications

And a press release (http://www.rom.on.ca/en/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/rom-researchers-discover-epic-new-burgess-shale-site-in-canadas) with more detail from the Royal Ontario Museum, which was involved with the work.

Yes,awesome ! I don't know the scale but some of these litttle beasties look as if they still exist today ! Yes life is old !