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Bawheid
2005-Jan-12, 04:58 PM
According to Microsoft..........

Step 1. Go to http://mappoint.msn.com/DirectionsFind.aspx
Step 2. As your start point enter for country: norway and placename: haugesund
Step 3. As your destination point enter for country:norway and placename: trondheim
Step 4. Press "Get Directions" and then stare in amazement
Step 5. Press "Reverse journey" and compare.

Swift
2005-Jan-12, 05:07 PM
#-o :lol:
Some of that trip looks like it might be a little wet.

The only slightly similar experience I've had is when mapquest first came out, the directions to the company I worked for included a right turn from one road to another. Unfortunately, those roads are not physically connected and are separated in elevation by about 15 meters.

Amadeus
2005-Jan-12, 05:30 PM
Microsoft does it again =D>

Sammy
2005-Jan-12, 05:33 PM
After many bad experiences (see example below), I will NOT use Mapquest for getting directions. I will pull up a map (tho I've seen errors like the unconnected roads noted above), but that's the limit of my use.

A typical experience: when we first moved to our current home, I went to Mapquest to get a "canned"set of directions for our friends to use when they visited. I asked for a route from our old address to the new one. Most of the trip should have been on Interstate or other divided highways, with the total distance being about 60 miles. Mapquest came up with a convoluted path through some of the densest urban areas, mostly on city streets/local 2-lane roads, totaling 151 miles! #-o

ToSeek
2005-Jan-12, 06:04 PM
A musician whose concert I went to a while back said that she uses one of those talking GPS devices to get wherever she's going. She and another musician were driving across Kansas on I-70 when the GPS told them to get off at the next exit, drive over to a little development, loop through the development and out the other side, and get back on the highway at the next exit.

Her conclusion was that the developer of GPS lived in one of the houses they drove past. She just wished she knew which one so she could wave. ;)

Swift
2005-Jan-12, 06:59 PM
A musician whose concert I went to a while back said that she uses one of those talking GPS devices to get wherever she's going. She and another musician were driving across Kansas on I-70 when the GPS told them to get off at the next exit, drive over to a little development, loop through the development and out the other side, and get back on the highway at the next exit.

Her conclusion was that the developer of GPS lived in one of the houses they drove past. She just wished she knew which one so she could wave. ;)
Easter eggs in GPS units. :D

Astronot
2005-Jan-12, 07:46 PM
That is a really funny routing. At certain times of year that ferry crossing on the North Sea requires a pretty strong stomach, however the fjords are worth the trip.

My experience with MapPoint is that it will stick to Interstate highways and other major roads at all cost. Like Houston to Amarillo through Oklahoma City? Iíve found places where two highways are separated by a few miles with a two lane connecting road but MapPoint will insists that going 30 miles out of your way to cross that space is the fastest way. Their maps are the best of the services I have used, but I prefer to check MapQuest and Yahoo Maps for routing. Even when the services give the same results I donít use MapPoint because other services give exit numbers off the Interstate so you can tell how far you are to the exit. (Or if you missed it)

Doodler
2005-Jan-12, 07:47 PM
I just heard a story at lunch from the architect I work for that a GPS direction system in a rental car tried four times to get them to drive up a one way street in the wrong direction.

My personal experience with MapQuest on a long road trip would have left me eternally looping the Memphis Beltway had I not inserted a missing instruction. (I did make two complete orbits, nice city.)

aurora
2005-Jan-12, 07:49 PM
A typical experience: when we first moved to our current home, I went to Mapquest to get a "canned"set of directions for our friends to use when they visited. I asked for a route from our old address to the new one. Most of the trip should have been on Interstate or other divided highways, with the total distance being about 60 miles. Mapquest came up with a convoluted path through some of the densest urban areas, mostly on city streets/local 2-lane roads, totaling 151 miles! #-o

I had one once, where I wanted to travel several hundred miles south, but Mapquest said the first thing I had to do was drive north into Canada, and then drive across Canada. It then bumped up against an ocean and seemed to be rather confused about what to do next. IIRC it eventually found a loop back. Quite a road trip, though.

Argos
2005-Jan-12, 08:26 PM
Never trust a map service that doesnīt include Brazil... :-?

Kebsis
2005-Jan-12, 08:56 PM
A typical experience: when we first moved to our current home, I went to Mapquest to get a "canned"set of directions for our friends to use when they visited. I asked for a route from our old address to the new one. Most of the trip should have been on Interstate or other divided highways, with the total distance being about 60 miles. Mapquest came up with a convoluted path through some of the densest urban areas, mostly on city streets/local 2-lane roads, totaling 151 miles!

Are you sure you didn't have it set to 'avoid highways'?

Sammy
2005-Jan-12, 10:28 PM
A typical experience: when we first moved to our current home, I went to Mapquest to get a "canned"set of directions for our friends to use when they visited. I asked for a route from our old address to the new one. Most of the trip should have been on Interstate or other divided highways, with the total distance being about 60 miles. Mapquest came up with a convoluted path through some of the densest urban areas, mostly on city streets/local 2-lane roads, totaling 151 miles!

Are you sure you didn't have it set to 'avoid highways'?

I have never seen that option on Mapquest. I went there just now to check again, and there is no such option offered.

Avatar28
2005-Jan-13, 12:35 AM
I don't see it, but their main page has this:



Back by Popular Demand

Get directions and click "Avoid Highways" for an alternate route.
Get directions and try it now.

sarongsong
2005-Jan-13, 12:55 AM
...Are you sure you didn't have it set to 'avoid highways'?
Or the Yellow Cab routing? :D

captain swoop
2005-Jan-13, 10:56 AM
One of the versions of Microsoft Autoroute takes you on a 400 mile journey when you try to get to one of the Scottish islands, it ignores the direct ferry route and takes you right around the Hebrides before letting you get on the right ferry.

And it has always had a junction on to the A66 on Teesside at a place where there is just an over bridge.

Maksutov
2005-Jan-13, 11:58 AM
Been driving since the early 1960s. First cross-country trip was mid-60s when a lot of the interstates were not completed. Just used road maps (free at gas stations then) and dead-reckoning. Got from CT to my destinations of Gothic, Colorado, and Lompoc, CA without any problems.

Always knowing where you are re north, the nearest city or town, one's general location in the city or the state, etc., really helps. And after much more than one million miles of driving, sorry ladies, but, no, I've never been lost. :D

Astronot
2005-Jan-13, 02:05 PM
I agree that is the best way to travel. But when traveling with a wife and two daughters its best to be prepared.

Maksutov
2005-Jan-13, 02:33 PM
I agree that is the best way to travel. But when traveling with a wife and two daughters its best to be prepared.
Well, that's also how I traveled with my wife and son. Ditto re previous and subsequent girlfriends.

There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions. I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say. She had even less to say a few weeks later when she became my ex-girlfriend.

kucharek
2005-Jan-13, 02:37 PM
There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions.

What is it with men and asking for directions? :D

Maksutov
2005-Jan-13, 02:41 PM
There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions.

What is it with men and asking for directions? :D
Talk about taking things out of context.

Funny that you left out


I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say.

If you know where you are, where you are going, and how to get there, you don't need to ask for directions.

Unless you're a henpecked wimp...

:D

ToSeek
2005-Jan-13, 02:46 PM
I agree that is the best way to travel. But when traveling with a wife and two daughters its best to be prepared.
Well, that's also how I traveled with my wife and son. Ditto re previous and subsequent girlfriends.

There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions. I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say. She had even less to say a few weeks later when she became my ex-girlfriend.

I was giving a female friend of mine a ride to a place she hadn't been before, and she was giving me directions she'd gotten from the place. We were driving down the next-to-last road, and she was saying, "Take the next right! Take the next right!" Then when we got to the next right, she said, "No, that doesn't look right - keep going." When we drove for about another mile without another chance to turn right, it was clear that that had been the correct turn. However, rather than do the obvious thing of turning around and taking that turn, she insisted that we drive all over the area looking for someone to ask directions of. We ended up driving about three miles in random directions until we found someone to ask, who of course told us to go back and take the turn we'd missed before. Arrgh!

Moose
2005-Jan-13, 02:56 PM
Mmm. Agreed. Verbal directions are overrated anyway.

I will admit I'm building a reputation for overshooting turns and exits, but there's only been once where I haven't realized it immediately. Normally, I can work my way back to where I need to be without any fuss.

There was, on one trip, where I overshot my exit and hadn't realized it for a good twenty minutes. Kind of embarrassing too, that even having been guided the proper exit, I couldn't find the side-street I was looking for. The landmark (a cemetary off the road) was under a blown light, and oncoming traffic made it an impenetratable shadow.

I did figure out the Pennsylvania highway system, though. *chuckle* There's that, at least.

In my defense, I did ask for help, though, when I knew I needed it.

kucharek
2005-Jan-13, 02:59 PM
There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions.

What is it with men and asking for directions? :D
Talk about taking things out of context.

Funny that you left out


I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say.

If you know where you are, where you are going, and how to get there, you don't need to ask for directions.

Unless you're a henpecked wimp...

:D

I just took the occassion to drop that quote :-)
I also have nearly never problems with directions, except it is a very cloudy day and I can't figure out where north is. I had never problems with getting to places in London or Tokyo. Only time I lost directions was a few blocks from where I live, but that was due to the girl accompanying me walking home from a party and totally occupying my senses... 8)

On the other hand, I'm pretty often asked for directions. Maybe I look harmless and intelligent. It is even more often when my kids are with me. I guess, then I look especially harmless and also more like some local who may know something. Unfortunately, I'm no car driver, just bicycle, and so I often have problems to give directions suitable for drivers.

Harald

Maksutov
2005-Jan-13, 03:42 PM
I agree that is the best way to travel. But when traveling with a wife and two daughters its best to be prepared.
Well, that's also how I traveled with my wife and son. Ditto re previous and subsequent girlfriends.

There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions. I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say. She had even less to say a few weeks later when she became my ex-girlfriend.

I was giving a female friend of mine a ride to a place she hadn't been before, and she was giving me directions she'd gotten from the place. We were driving down the next-to-last road, and she was saying, "Take the next right! Take the next right!" Then when we got to the next right, she said, "No, that doesn't look right - keep going." When we drove for about another mile without another chance to turn right, it was clear that that had been the correct turn. However, rather than do the obvious thing of turning around and taking that turn, she insisted that we drive all over the area looking for someone to ask directions of. We ended up driving about three miles in random directions until we found someone to ask, who of course told us to go back and take the turn we'd missed before. Arrgh!
Good lord, does that sound familiar! Then try doing that with a female in the passenger seat who had been in the same situation a few years back and side impacted! Any tiny, minor threat from adjacent lanes or streets became excuses for major panic attacks and a stream of accusations re my incompetent driving.

Pointing out that I was quite aware of what was going on around me, and the fact that we had not been hit, or even come close to, was the catalyst that set off a diatribe about how with just a little bit of difference we would have been side impacted, my driving skills were terrible, and I was teasing with her phobias about being a passenger.

There was one time I then pulled over and said, "OK, you drive!" This was followed by a short trip where we were averaging 20 miles per hour over the speed limit (65), changing lanes without signaling, and otherwise ignoring most rules of the road. When I regained control of my car, I asked her what she was doing. She replied that the faster we went, the less time we were on the road, and therefore the less likely we were to be involved in an accident. Plus signals let other people know what you were going to do, and allowed them to counter by cutting you off, etc.

I wish I were making this up. :roll:

Doodler
2005-Jan-13, 04:13 PM
Good lord, does that sound familiar! Then try doing that with a female in the passenger seat who had been in the same situation a few years back and side impacted! Any tiny, minor threat from adjacent lanes or streets became excuses for major panic attacks and a stream of accusations re my incompetent driving.

Pointing out that I was quite aware of what was going on around me, and the fact that we had not been hit, or even come close to, was the catalyst that set off a diatribe about how with just a little bit of difference we would have been side impacted, my driving skills were terrible, and I was teasing with her phobias about being a passenger.

There was one time I then pulled over and said, "OK, you drive!" This was followed by a short trip where we were averaging 20 miles per hour over the speed limit (65), changing lanes without signaling, and otherwise ignoring most rules of the road. When I regained control of my car, I asked her what she was doing. She replied that the faster we went, the less time we were on the road, and therefore the less likely we were to be involved in an accident. Plus signals let other people know what you were going to do, and allowed them to counter by cutting you off, etc.

I wish I were making this up. :roll:

Heh, I've got one like this. Very good ladyfriend of mine who goes into seizures when I exceed the speed limit by 5 mph, but will not hesitate to drive a car with her thighs while eating lunch and talking on a cell phone.

Kebsis
2005-Jan-13, 06:18 PM
A typical experience: when we first moved to our current home, I went to Mapquest to get a "canned"set of directions for our friends to use when they visited. I asked for a route from our old address to the new one. Most of the trip should have been on Interstate or other divided highways, with the total distance being about 60 miles. Mapquest came up with a convoluted path through some of the densest urban areas, mostly on city streets/local 2-lane roads, totaling 151 miles!

Are you sure you didn't have it set to 'avoid highways'?

I have never seen that option on Mapquest. I went there just now to check again, and there is no such option offered.

The option comes up after you input the directions.

http://www.digikitten.com/playhousev2/files/McDurmit/mapquest.jpg

Sammy
2005-Jan-13, 07:58 PM
OK, Kebsis, spotted it now!

BUT, I know that I never selected it, so that doesn't explain the weird routings Mapquest has given me.

Another example, just 4 weeks ago: my wife's car got hit (rear-end) by a dummy. No injuries, but the car couldn't be safely driven because the tail/brake lights were knocked out. The police had her car towed and took her to a County Police station so she could be picked up. It was about 50 miles away, outside Baltimore. Mapquest had me going on a round-about route, sending me south, then west, then northeast, and off/on the Balt. Beltway and Thruway leading to the Harbor Tunnel. About 20 turns, including one intersection NOT on their map. A quick call to the Police Station got me a simple, direct route, 20 miles shorter, and with only about 5 turns.

Careless
2005-Jan-13, 08:15 PM
There was one girlfriend who, while we were traveling through SW Florida (Fort Meyers, Sanibel Island, etc.), was convinced I was lost and threw a fit over my not stopping to ask directions.

What is it with men and asking for directions? :D
Talk about taking things out of context.

Funny that you left out


I calmly told her that we would be at the hotel where we had reservations for that night, in about 20 minutes. About 20 minutes later, when we pulled into the main entrance of the hotel, she had nothing to say.

If you know where you are, where you are going, and how to get there, you don't need to ask for directions.

Unless you're a henpecked wimp...

:D
You know, I like being lost. get to learn a lot about a place by being lost there. As a result, I know a lot about the roads in places like buffalo and western madison (WI) and a bunch of other places