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wd40
2015-Feb-23, 01:41 PM
Was the odor from sweat, breath and flatulence of 3 unwashed nervous grown men cooped up in 6 cubic metres for 6 days an issue on Apollo, and if so how was it addressed? Do CO2 filters have a deodorizing effect?

DonM435
2015-Feb-23, 02:18 PM
I believe that those guys were carefully screened for any weaknesses, physical, psychological or physiological, so anybody that was too sensitive to that sort of thing wouldn't have passed mustard. Err, muster.

CJSF
2015-Feb-23, 02:23 PM
If you take a modicum of effort and search out some of the mission transcripts and post-mission interviews of both the Gemini and Apollo missions, the astronauts do make mention of this sort of thing, and it seems they took it in stride. As DonM453 says, if any of the astronauts had a weak enough stomach that body odor would have interfered, they'd never have flown beyond the Mercury missions.

CJSF

Jim
2015-Feb-23, 03:02 PM
CJSF, that opening is a bit rude. Let's play nice.

Spacedude
2015-Feb-23, 03:34 PM
Perhaps over time their noses get used to the smell and it doesn't have much of an impact as it would have if you or I just stepped into their capsule.

DonM435
2015-Feb-23, 04:21 PM
I do remember one astronaut memoir -- maybe it was on Apollo XI -- that mentioned a failure of the device that removes hydrogen from their drinking water. This caused considerable gaseous anomalies in the cramped quarters. One of the ground controllers overheard the action and suggested "Why don't you guys just turn off the attitude control thrusters and do the job yourselves?"

wd40
2015-Feb-23, 04:31 PM
Has any astronaut ever vomited in space?

The odor of partially digested food and gastric acids floating inside a spacesuit or capsule must be bad, and you can't do anything about it.

The odor of freshly exposed human feces and vomit are probably the most repugnant of all odors to the human olfactory nerve, and could even be hazardous, as it can totally derange the ability to mentally concentrate, especially if it belongs to someone else. Astronauts really were "The Right Stuff"!

John Mendenhall
2015-Feb-23, 04:38 PM
There is an old saying out of the military, who may be in situations where they can't wash, "If everybody stinks then nobody stinks."

Noclevername
2015-Feb-23, 04:54 PM
Has any astronaut ever vomited in space?

Yes, and most non-astronaut space visitors, too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weightlessness

The most common problem experienced by humans in the initial hours of weightlessness is known as space adaptation syndrome or SAS, commonly referred to as space sickness. Symptoms of SAS include nausea and vomiting, vertigo, headaches, lethargy, and overall malaise.[11] The first case of SAS was reported by cosmonaut Gherman Titov in 1961. Since then, roughly 45% of all people who have flown in space have suffered from this condition. The duration of space sickness varies, but in no case has it lasted for more than 72 hours, after which the body adjusts to the new environment. NASA jokingly measures SAS using the "Garn scale", named for United States Senator Jake Garn, whose SAS during STS-51-D was the worst on record. Accordingly, one "Garn" is equivalent to the most severe possible case of SAS.

Bold mine.

NEOWatcher
2015-Feb-23, 07:49 PM
From what I read, it didn't affect Mercury and Gemini because they were usually strapped in.
But; Titov (the second human to orbit) did. He was the first.
Then there is Apollo 8. Not only did they have the normal issues with body odor and vomit, Borman also had diarrhea.
According to Bill Anders (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/moon/sfeature/sf_inside.html);

"It was bad. You know it's amazing, after a while you didn't smell it. Not because the smell went away -- 'cause you get used to it. I guess a skunk can learn to live with himself."
Even though the frogmen that opened the capsule was quoted in many movies. "Sir, it wasn't how you looked, it was how you smelled."

slang
2015-Feb-23, 08:51 PM
Anecdote, not evidence, but: it's not just spacecraft. Someone I briefly worked with had an earlier career as a submariner. He mentioned the less than pleasant smells too.

LookingSkyward
2015-Feb-23, 09:01 PM
Yep, submarines = smelly. Short anecdote to follow.

LookingSkyward
2015-Feb-23, 09:27 PM
we pulled in to Pearl Harbor, and a bunch of us headed for town.
Taxi driver: Are you guys off a submarine?
Us: yeah, how could you tell?
TD: Cuz you're pasty-white like you're dead, and you stink!

Solfe
2015-Feb-23, 09:41 PM
I work in a special needs school and some of the student's hygiene is atrocious. Some of it is unavoidable, for example having to diaper a 20 year old because they can't move under their own power. You get used to it.

I implemented my own hygiene regime in the classroom, everyone puts on deodorant and brushes their teeth every day, if they so choose. Including me. Some students don't participate for a variety of reasons. No big deal.

KaiYeves
2015-Feb-24, 01:45 AM
we pulled in to Pearl Harbor, and a bunch of us headed for town.
Taxi driver: Are you guys off a submarine?
Us: yeah, how could you tell?
TD: Cuz you're pasty-white like you're dead, and you stink!

I've always thought a nuclear submarine would be a fairly safe base in a zombie attack, but if you'd look and smell dead upon emerging, it might be hard trying to network with other survivors.

Trebuchet
2015-Feb-24, 02:27 AM
Was the odor from sweat, breath and flatulence of 3 unwashed nervous grown men cooped up in 6 cubic metres for 6 days an issue on Apollo, and if so how was it addressed? Do CO2 filters have a deodorizing effect?

(My bold and red.) No. You want activated carbon for that. I'm sure they had some, just as I'm sure it was inadequate. Considering all of the other hazards and hardships they faced, GO is pretty trivial.

Until the latter part of the 20th century, all humans smelled bad. You get used to it. Predators probably found it helpful.