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Wolverine
2005-Jan-15, 07:34 AM
It's understandable that Huygens has been in the spotlight, but wasn't SMART-1 expected to reach an operational lunar orbit on the 13th? I've yet to see any updates.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Jan-15, 08:29 AM
I saw no reports

archive report of smart1 (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=31517&farchive_objecttypeid=30 &farchive_objectid=30930&fareaid_2=63)

if I see anything on the site I'll post it

Wolverine
2005-Jan-15, 08:45 AM
Here's (http://smart.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=36091) where I'd seen the date, but didn't see any other mention searching ESA's pages. Perhaps there will be more coverage the first of the week or so. It'd be delightful to see new lunar goodies in addition to the images and data from Titan.

Visitor
2005-Jan-18, 03:47 PM
Latest news. (http://smart.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=36358)

frogesque
2005-Jan-18, 04:27 PM
Latest news. (http://smart.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=36358)

Looking great if the hi res of Pythagorus is anything to go by.

Wolverine
2005-Jan-18, 06:12 PM
Ahha! Thanks for the URL, I figured we'd get an update after the weekend.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Jan-26, 04:11 PM
some more writing and pics here

http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/smart1/smart20050125c.jpg

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=15191

http://sci.esa.int/science-e-media/img/06/Orbit090105-400.jpg

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMY5JO3E4E_index_0.html





The ion engine was switched on until 29 December, allowing SMART-1 to make ever-decreasing loops around the Moon. The engine was switched off between 29 December and 3 January 2005 to allow scientists to start observations. At this point, the AMIE camera took the close-up lunar images. The engine was switched off again to optimise fuel consumption on 12 January, and SMART-1 will spend until 9 February making a medium resolution survey of the Moon, taking advantage of the favourable illumination conditions.

ESA's SMART-1 Project Scientist Bernard Foing said "A sequence of test lunar observations was done in January at distances between 1000 and 5000 kilometres altitude, when the electric propulsion was paused. We are conducting more survey test observations until the electric propulsion resumes from 9 February to spiral down further towards the Moon. SMART-1 will arrive on 28 February at the initial orbit with altitudes between 300 and 3000 kilometres ...

:D

Launch window
2006-Jan-31, 10:45 PM
SMART-1 To Crash Into Lunar Surface In August
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/SMART_1_To_Crash_Into_Lunar_Surface_In_August.html
The European Moon probe SMART-1, which was developed by SSC for ESA, has been orbiting the Moon since November 2004. Its main mission, to qualify an electric propulsion system, is completed, and the probe is now making observations of the lunar surface using its onboard scientific instruments.



Astronomers are invited to take part in observations of the crash

For the crash to be observable, the touch-down must take place on the part of the Moon that is facing Earth. To enable this, ESA is considering using the small remaining quantity of fuel onboard to modify the spacecraft's orbit. At present, SSC's engineers are preparing the necessary rocket impulses. ESA has also distributed a circular letter to scientists to gauge their interest in these observations.

China and India training with SMART-1

Apart from making observations of the lunar surface from a gradually lower orbit, SMART-1 will be used by Indian and Chinese ground stations for radio control training for their future moon orbiters.

Wolverine
2006-Feb-01, 03:07 AM
I wish they wouldn't be so stingy with the S1 imagery. Thus far we've seen very little.

Mortac
2006-Feb-01, 04:02 AM
Smart-1 is built by the Swedish Space Corporation and their website can be found here:

http://www.ssc.se/

They have a couple of links if you click on 'read more'. Not sure if there's anything new in it though as I didn't go through the other links.

Wolverine
2006-Feb-17, 12:11 AM
Finally, an update (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM7Z3MVGJE_0.html):


This composite image (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM7Z3MVGJE_1.html), taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows crater Billy at the edge of a large lava plain on the Moon.

The AMIE camera obtained two images in consecutive orbits, from a distance of about 1260 kilometres with a ground resolution of approximately 114 metres per pixel. Each image has a field of view of 56 kilometres.

V-GER
2006-Mar-03, 12:54 AM
Here's the latest, Crater Lichtenberg
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMQ0SMVGJE_index_0.html

Photon
2006-Mar-03, 02:08 AM
I wish they wouldn't be so stingy with the S1 imagery. Thus far we've seen very little

I agree, Its not like you get a vehicle close enough every day.

Launch window
2006-Mar-09, 08:45 PM
image shows some of the areas covered by SMART-1 AMIE camera, soverimposed on a NASA/Clementine's scenery. The AMIE observations were performed on 5 and 6 February 2006.
Crater Bond and crater Mayer are among the relevant features observed.
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/smart_1/002_H.jpg



9 March 2006
This composite image, obtained by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows a nice scene near the Moon terminator (the line separating lunar day and night).

Low solar elevation on the landscape produces long shadows of several craters reshaped by lava, debris and erosion, and other geological features.
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMREBNVGJE_0.html
The AMIE camera obtained the snapshot images on 5 and 6 February 2006, from altitudes ranging between 2685 km (bottom of the composite) and 2709 km (top). Each individual snapshot, taken with the AMIE clear filter, is a square of about 135 kilometres per side. The whole composite covers approximately 270 square kilometres.


SMART-1’s view of Mayer and Bond craters reshaped by lava and debris
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMREBNVGJE_1.html
Each individual snapshot, taken with the AMIE clear filter, is about 135 square kilometres. The whole composite covers an area of approximately 270 square kilometres.

Launch window
2006-Mar-23, 08:11 AM
Tectonic ‘wrinkles’ in Crater De Gasparis
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEME93OVGJE_index_0.html
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEME93OVGJE_1.html
22 March 2006
This image, taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows Crater De Gasparis on the Moon.

Launch window
2006-Apr-01, 10:29 PM
Tracking Reiner Gamma

Date: 30 Mar 2006
Satellite: SMART-1

http://smart.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39022

Animation of targeted Reiner Gamma observations

01101001
2006-Apr-26, 03:28 PM
SMART-1 maps Humorum edge - where Highlands and Mare mix (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMHWFOFGLE_0.html)


26 April 2006
This sequence of images, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows on area on the near side of the Moon, on the edge of the Mare Humorum basin.

Nicolas
2006-Apr-27, 07:09 AM
Nice pictures from a craft that is only a technology demonstrator! :)

01101001
2006-May-27, 05:05 AM
SMART-1’s view of Crater Hopmann: on the shoulder of a giant (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM1PPOFGLE_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/AMI_EAE3_001834_00022_00038_S.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM1PPOFGLE_0.html)


3 May 2006
This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows one quarter of crater Hopmann - an impact structure about 88 kilometres in diameter.
Highlands and Mare landscapes on the Moon (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMGBM9ATME_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/AMI_highlights_mare_EAE3_S.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMGBM9ATME_0.html)


26 May 2006
These two images, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, show the difference between lunar highlands and a mare area from close by.

mantiss
2006-Jun-01, 02:29 PM
Here (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMVQM9ATME_index_0.html)

valmirmmorais
2006-Jun-21, 02:09 AM
Dear colleagues,

I’m joining in a Blog all the available information and unpublished data about the SMART-1 spacecraft impact against the lunar surface, which will be possibly held at 2:00 UT, on the 3rd of September, 2006.

English version: http://smart1-lunar-impact-ing.blogspot.com/
Portuguese version: http://smart1-lunar-impact-br.blogspot.com/

I’m still working on the Spanish version, which will be published soon.

This is not a definitive work. Some data will be submitted to changes due to the spacecraft orbital corrections, which will be performed by the ESA mission control. Soon, these necessary corrections will be published.

In Brazil, the Seção Lunar da Rede de Astronomia Observacional - REA http://www.reabrasil.org/lunar/ , is developing and coordinating a nationwide observation project named SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project http://www.reabrasil.org/lunar/smart1impact.htm which is coordinated by Ms. Rosely Gregio - rgregio@uol.com.br Chief Coordinator of the Lunar Section, Mr. José Serrano Agustoni - agustoni@yahoo.com , Manager of Lunar Impact Projects and Mr. Valmir Martins de Morais - valmirmmorais@yahoo.com.br Member of the International Campaign Moon SMART-1 Project: Predictions and Observation Campaign, and of the Team of Observers of SLRBr (Lunar Section / REA-BRAZIL).

I’d really appreciate your comments, suggestions and corrections in order to improve the quality of the research.

“Astronomy is collaboration”.


Great observations and good skies for all!

Sincerely yours,

Valmir Martins de Morais - valmirmmorais@yahoo.com.br
Coordinator for the SL/REA Smart-1 Lunar Impact Project .
Member of the Moon SMART Impact: Predictions and Observation Campaign.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Jul-02, 01:22 PM
Mysterious Lunar Swirls
http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Mysterious_Lunar_Swirls_999.html

ToSeek
2006-Jul-03, 05:39 PM
Mysterious Lunar Swirls
http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Mysterious_Lunar_Swirls_999.html

ToSeeked (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=43442)

valmirmmorais
2006-Jul-09, 03:29 AM
Dear Colleagues,

Due to the beginning of the operations for the SMART-1 orbital corrections, performed to elevate its perilune at about 90km, we accomplished higher precision of the time of the impact: 01:26:24 UT (This time will depend of course on many different factors).

I have just finished the updating of the new data and graphics about the SMART-1 impact.
Please, check updated in the homepage of the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project, in the Lunar Section of the Rede de Astronomia Observacional –REA/ BRASIL:

English Version: http://slrea-smart1lunar-impact-project-ing.blogspot.com/

Portuguese Version: http://www.slrea-smart1lunar-impact-project.blogspot.com/

Spanish Version: http://www.slrea-smart1lunar-impact-project-esp.blogspot.com/

REA Brasil Lunar Section : http://www.reabrasil.org/lunar/smart1impact.htm

Great observations and good skies for all!

Sincerely yours,

Valmir Martins de Morais
Coordinator for the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project BRASIL
Member of the Moon SMART Impact: Predictions and Observation Campaign -ESA Science & Technology – SMART-1

Blob
2006-Jul-12, 10:21 PM
A mosaic of three images, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the area close to the Sulpicius Gallus crater on the Moon.

Read more (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMGV5XAIPE_index_1.html)

ToSeek
2006-Jul-14, 08:39 PM
Landscapes from the ancient and eroded lunar far side (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMDWNWALPE_0.html)


This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows a highly eroded highland area on the lunar far side, close to the equator.

AMIE obtained this image on 1 January 2006, from a distance of 1483 kilometres from the surface, with a ground resolution of 134 metres per pixel. The imaged area is centred at a latitude of 4.2º South and longitude 98.4º East.

http://www.esa.int/images/moon_M.jpg

ToSeek
2006-Jul-21, 05:08 PM
SMART-1 birthday postcard of Apollo 11 landing site (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM1O6BUQPE_0.html)


This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the Apollo 11 landing site in the Mare Tranquillitatis on the Moon.

AMIE obtained the image on 5 February 2006 from a distance of 1764 kilometres from the surface, with a ground resolution of 159 metres per pixel. The imaged area is centred at a longitude of 23.9º East close to the Moon equator, at 1.7º latitude.

The area is close to crater Moltke (outside the field of view of this image) in the Mare Tranquilitatis. The arrow shows the landing site of Apollo 11, where the first men from Earth set foot on another object in our solar system on 20 July 1969. The two prominent craters nearby are named after two of the Apollo 11 astronauts. The first man on the Moon, Armstrong, has a crater named after him outside the field of this image.

As can be seen from the image, the area which was selected for the first landing has a fairly featureless, on a large scale smooth surface. This was done on purpose to make the landing easier.

http://www.esa.int/images/1888_40L_M2.jpg

Is this like the most boring spot on the Moon or what?

Blob
2006-Jul-24, 04:36 PM
In Spring this year European radio astronomers started a test observation campaign to track from Earth the trajectory of the SMART-1 spacecraft around the Moon. While other worldwide radio telescopes are now joining the campaign, the experts have started analysing the first results, precious for tracking SMART-1 up to its lunar impact and future lunar missions as well.

The two stations will take advantage of their favourable location to observe the SMART-1 impact.

The impact is due to take place on 3 September 2006 at 07:41 CEST (05:41 UT), with an uncertainty of plus or minus 7 hours.

Read more (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMW58BUQPE_index_0.html)

ToSeek
2006-Jul-25, 04:56 PM
Lomonosov – a large crater filled by lava (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM1R6BUQPE_index_0.html)


This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows crater Lomonosov on the Moon’s far side.

http://www.esa.int/images/AMI_EAE3_001856_M.jpg

01101001
2006-Jul-27, 06:08 PM
Mersenius crater – wrinkles between Humorum and Procellarum (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMTV6BUQPE_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/MERSENUS_Mosaic_S2.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMTV6BUQPE_0.html)


Crater Mersenius C is positioned in the highland area between Mare Humorum and the Oceanus Procellarum. The crater has a diameter of 14 kilometres and is best visible for ground-based observers 4 days after first quarter Moon.

It is named in honour of Marin Mersene, a French philosopher and physicist (1588 - 1648). The crater is surrounded by a system of so-called 'grabens', which are fractures that form when the lunar surface sinks slightly as a result of faults.

Nicolas
2006-Jul-27, 10:36 PM
quite nice pics for a simple test sat!

ToSeek
2006-Aug-01, 02:42 PM
Mare Serenitatis: crater statistics and lunar chronology (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM847BUQPE_0.html)


This animated sequence, composed of three images taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows a portion of Mare Serenitatis on the Moon.

loglo
2006-Aug-01, 07:43 PM
Mare Serenitatis: crater statistics and lunar chronology
Is that the terminator on the left of the picture or just a shadow from a lunar feature?

ToSeek
2006-Aug-01, 10:36 PM
Is that the terminator on the left of the picture or just a shadow from a lunar feature?

I'm not sure what to make of it - neither of your ideas works. It can't be the terminator because the Sun is shining from the top of the picture as shown, and I doubt it's a shadow because there wouldn't be anything to cast a shadow that big. So either it's some sort of spacecraft or processing artifact or a darker area on the surface. (I lean toward artifact, but I wouldn't swear to it.)

Superluminal
2006-Aug-02, 01:06 AM
Check out National Geographic from Dec. 1973, I think, anyway it is the one with NG's article about Apollo 17. There is a picture of Mare Serenitatis taken from the CSM that shows an area west of the landing sight. The picture is very similar to the one in ToSeeks link. It is a real area of lighter and darker mare material. The magazine is buried beneath years of debris, otherwise I would go and check the caption for the explanation.

ToSeek
2006-Aug-02, 04:02 AM
Check out National Geographic from Dec. 1973, I think, anyway it is the one with NG's article about Apollo 17. There is a picture of Mare Serenitatis taken from the CSM that shows an area west of the landing sight. The picture is very similar to the one in ToSeeks link. It is a real area of lighter and darker mare material. The magazine is buried beneath years of debris, otherwise I would go and check the caption for the explanation.

Does this (http://homepage.mac.com/kevinwparker/273I0293.JPG) look like the image you're talking about? (I've got the complete National Geographic on CD, and that image matches your description.)

Superluminal
2006-Aug-03, 01:35 AM
Close, I've seen that pic before and noticed the light-dark mare in the the background. But the one I'm thinking of is looking straight down, maybe I saw it somewhere else and just connected it to that issue of NG.

loglo
2006-Aug-04, 01:52 AM
Thanks guys, just goes to show the perils of making snap judgements of pictures from orbit. :) Sometimes those dark bits are really dark bits!

ToSeek
2006-Aug-04, 04:40 PM
SMART-1 towards final impact (http://www.physorg.com/news73909378.html)


SMART-1, the successful first European spacecraft to the Moon, is now about to end its exploration adventure, after almost sixteen months of lunar science investigations. SMART-1 was launched on 27 September 2003, and it reached the Moon in November 2004 after a long spiralling around Earth. In this phase, the spacecraft tested for the first time in space a series of advanced technologies.

Nicolas
2006-Aug-04, 07:46 PM
While the results might not have the public impact of the Mars Rovers, I think that SMART-1 can be considered a very successful high-risk mission!

ToSeek
2006-Aug-09, 07:56 PM
An oblique look on the north lunar far west (http://www.physorg.com/news74342660.html)


This image, taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, provides an 'oblique' view of the lunar surface towards the limb, around the Mezentsev, Niepce and Merrill craters, on the far side of the Moon.

valmirmmorais
2006-Aug-12, 01:25 AM
Dear Colleagues,


Please, check the news data and news time, images and graphics updated for lunar impact of the SMART-1 in the homepage of the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project, in the Lunar Section of the Rede de Astronomia Observacional REA – BRAZIL.

These are the last orbit prediction we have for SMART-1.

English Version: http://slrea-smart1lunar-impact-project-ing.blogspot.com/


Best regards,

Valmir Martins de Morais- valmirmmorais@yahoo.com.br
Coordinator for the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project - Secção Lunar REA/BRAZIL
Member of the Moon SMART Impact: Predictions and Observation Campaign.

kashi
2006-Aug-12, 02:16 AM
Hi Valmir,

I've had users report this post. Since it is astronomy/space exploration related I don't consider it spam, but I'd encourage you to participate in discussions rather than just use the forum to promote your own site.

Kind regards,

Kashi

ToSeek
2006-Aug-12, 02:33 AM
I merged the posts into the SMART-1 thread we already had and deleted the duplicate.

Blob
2006-Aug-14, 05:18 PM
This high-resolution image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft, shows part of crater Jacobi in the southern hemisphere of the Moon. The rim of the crater is seen on the upper edge of the image.

Read more (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM8A7BUQPE_FeatureWeek_1.html)

Wolverine
2006-Aug-14, 08:37 PM
Note: I took the liberty of removing the question mark from the thread title.

ToSeek
2006-Aug-16, 05:57 PM
Europe's Spacecraft To The Moon Heads Toward Final Impact (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/08/060814122740.htm)


The choice of 3 September for lunar impact was led by the decision to obtain further high resolution lunar data from orbit and to allow ground telescopes to see the impact from Earth.

On 3 September 2006 the SMART-1 perilune, coinciding with the point of impact, will be on the lunar area called ‘Lake of Excellence’, located at mid-southern latitudes. This area is very interesting from the scientific point of view. It is a volcanic plain area surrounded by highlands, but also characterised by ground mineral heterogeneities.

At the time of impact, this area will be in the dark on the near-side of the Moon, just near the terminator – the line separating the lunar day-side from the night-side. The region will be shadowed from the Sun’s direct rays, but it will be lit faintly by the light from the Earth – by earthshine. The spacecraft’s orbit will take it over the region every five hours, getting one kilometre lower at each pass. From Earth, a Moon quarter will be visible at that time.

This geometry is ideal to allow ground observations. In fact, during full Moon the luminosity would have completely obscured the impact to ground observers, and during new Moon it would have been difficult as well, because new Moon is visible only for a few seconds after sunset. Furthermore, an impact in the dark will favour the detection of the impact flash.

The ground telescopes will also try to observe the dust ejected by the impact, hoping to obtain physical and mineralogical data on the surface excavated by the spacecraft.

The expected impact time (07:41 CEST ) will be good for big telescopes in South and Northwest Americas and Hawaii and possibly Australia. But if SMART-1 hits a hill on its previous pass, around 02:37 CEST on 3 September, then it can be observed from the Canary Islands and South America. If SMART-1 hits a hill on the pass on 2 September at 21:33 CEST, then telescopes in Continental Europe and Africa will have the advantage.

Blob
2006-Aug-17, 11:26 AM
If you are a professional or amateur astronomer and want to contribute to the final phase of the SMART-1 mission, join ESA on the impact ground observation campaign.

Like most of its lunar predecessors, SMART-1 will conclude its scientific observations of the Moon through a small impact on the lunar surface. This is planned to take place in the lunar Lake of Excellence, located at mid-southern latitudes. A trim manoeuvre at the end of July has determined that the impact will most likely occur on 3 September 2006 at 07:41 CEST (05:41 UT), or at 02:36 CEST (00:36 UT) on the previous orbit due to uncertainties in the detailed knowledge of the lunar topography.

If impacting on 3 Sept at 07:41 CEST, SMART-1 will touch the Moon at the lunar coordinates 36.44º South and 46.25º West. If impacting on 3 September at 02:36 CEST the lunar coordinates will be 36.4º South and 43.5º West.

Read more (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMTU0Z7QQE_index_0.html)

ToSeek
2006-Aug-22, 03:46 PM
Moon Chemistry Confirms Violent Origin (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060822_science_tuesday.html)


he mystery of how Earth got its Moon is one step closer to being solved.

The European Space Agency's lunar-orbiting craft called SMART-1 has completed the first detailed chemical mapping of the lunar surface. The detected chemicals, such as calcium and magnesium, give a boost to the longstanding theory that the Moon formed from the debris flung into space after a collision between early Earth and a Mars-size planet.

Calcium, in particular, is found deep inside Earth. So if the Moon has a lot of calcium, then perhaps it is made of material that was once inside our planet.

Armed with miniaturized instruments—including an ultra-compact electronic camera, an X-ray telescope the size of a toaster for mapping chemical composition, and high-tech communication gadgets—SMART-1 had lofty goals. It was to pin down out how the Moon came to exist, search for water locked up as ice in the depths of Sun-deprived craters, and map the mineral composition of the Moon's crust.

ToSeek
2006-Aug-22, 07:18 PM
Close-up on Cuvier crater ridge (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.rss.html?pid=21783)


This high-resolution image, taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the young crater 'Cuvier C' on the Moon.

01101001
2006-Aug-29, 10:00 PM
SMART-1 ‘star tracker’ peeks at the approaching lunar surface (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMPFY5LARE_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/ST_image_23-08-06_10_42UTC_S.jpg (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEMPFY5LARE_0.html)


29 August 2006
While ESA's SMART-1 mission is running on its last orbits around the Moon before its planned lunar impact on 3 September 2006, the spacecraft 'star tracker' – or attitude camera - is taking exciting pictures of the ever approaching surface.

Blob
2006-Aug-30, 03:42 AM
Impact landing on the Moon
As ESA's SMART-1 impacts the Moon, telescopes here on Earth will be watching.

See more (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/ESApod/SEMTUU5LARE_0.html)

mickal555
2006-Aug-30, 07:03 AM
A European spaceship is about to crash into the Moon. Amateur astronomers may be able to observe the impact.



http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/30aug_smart1.htm?list906510

Argos
2006-Aug-31, 01:17 PM
This reminds me of an Arthur Clarke story called "Maelstrom". I think that was the only sci-fi tale of a ship crashing on the Moon. It will be cool.

Nicolas
2006-Aug-31, 05:49 PM
ESA intern mail described it as (I don't have the mail here, so it's from memory)

"a controlled, abrupt landing". They did use the word "crash" before and after that passage though. I thought it was due for sunday, but I forgot the hour. Somewhere in the evening CET?

Blob
2006-Aug-31, 06:28 PM
This mosaic of images, obtained by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows the SMART-1 landing site on the Moon.

IMAGE (http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/smart_1/Smart-1_Impact-Area_2_H.jpg) (582kb, 1199 x 1812)

AMIE obtained this sequence on 19 August 2006 from the relatively high distance of 1200 kilometres from the surface (far from the SMART-1 perilune, or point of closer approach), with a ground resolution of about 120 metres per pixel. The imaged area, located at mid-southern latitudes on the lunar near-side, belongs to the so-called 'Lake of Excellence'.
To take these images, SMART-1 had to be tilted by 20 degrees in order to obtain a large ground coverage and an image mosaic of several views, each covering an area about 60 kilometres per side.
SMART-1's impact is currently expected on 3 September 2006 at 07:41 CEST (05:41:51 UT), in the point of 46.2º West longitude and 33.3º South latitude, but it could take place one orbit earlier, at 02:37 CEST (00:37 UT), if an unknown peak is in SMART-1's way.

Read more (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMRR46LARE_index_0.html)

Nicolas
2006-Aug-31, 07:01 PM
How close to the surface is the perilune of the last orbit before the "controlled, abrupt landing"?

(excluding possible peaks)

Nicolas
2006-Sep-01, 10:58 AM
I just received a scale model from the moon.

That's right, the whole moon :).

It's a beach ball, textured with Smart-1 lunar photography. I also got a Smart-1 puzzle. I wonder whether that refers to Smart-1 being scattered in 1000 pieces on sunday. The box doesn't mention it... ;)

They were handing out these gadgets to lessen the pain of the ending of the Smart-1 mission. This time, the description of the crash was:

"It is directed to touch down on the Moon - and not too softly - in the early hours of Sunday." :).

A colleague told me he thought the final perilune before the crash orbit was 70m.

I assume it's due to the large gravity of the moon that they can't make the sat do a soft landing as they once did with that asteroid satelllite that also wasn't designed as a lander. Oh well, it's still a nice and spectacular way to end a perfect mission :). Perfect, even though you could have gone faster to the moon by car :D.

Blob
2006-Sep-01, 12:54 PM
September's Episode - The Sun and Moon
Monday 4th September, BBC One 00:30 - 00:50
The lunar probe Smart-1 will finish its mission in September by spectacularly crashing into the moon's surface. Patrick Moore talks to SMART-1 project scientist Bernard Foing about the lunar probe's pioneering technology, and Chris Lintott examines two new solar missions.

ToSeek
2006-Sep-01, 02:31 PM
I assume it's due to the large gravity of the moon that they can't make the sat do a soft landing as they once did with that asteroid satelllite that also wasn't designed as a lander. Oh well, it's still a nice and spectacular way to end a perfect mission :). Perfect, even though you could have gone faster to the moon by car :D.

I was working at APL when they were doing the NEAR landing on Eros, and they were saying that in practice it was more like a rendezvous and docking than a landing, since the gravity of Eros is so minimal.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-01, 06:45 PM
If you would land firmly on it, you would bounce right off :).

Thanks for the comment.

JohnD
2006-Sep-02, 06:13 PM
All,
Seeing in the UK will be zero tonight.
Any webcams focused on the Moon, that might show up an early crashdown?

The Guardian quotes 2031 tonight, or 0643 tomorrow.
See: http://www.guardian.co.uk/space/article/0,,1863423,00.html

John

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Sep-03, 05:38 AM
SMART-1's collision with the moon
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=4752

How to observe SMART-1's impact on the Moon
http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn9891-how-to-observe-smart1s-impact-on-the-moon.html
When it collides with the Moon on Saturday night, the SMART-1 spacecraft might create a bright spot of light that could be visible using a simple pair of binoculars. The effect could last about a minute – but will only be visible from some parts of the world.

Wolverine
2006-Sep-03, 06:21 AM
I was really hoping to catch a glimpse through the eyepiece, or at least give it my best effort. Instead we've had persistent cloud cover and intermittent showers. Grumble. Hopefully others have had a chance to observe.

01101001
2006-Sep-03, 08:29 AM
Pictures and movie at CFHT Observatory (http://www.cfht.hawaii.edu/News/Smart1/)

http://www.cfht.hawaii.edu/News/Smart1/865170.jpg
"Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope / 2006"

JohnD
2006-Sep-03, 11:21 AM
I suppose infrared was the best option.
Will anyone be looking for the impact marks when that area is in sunlight again?
Would that be useful?
John

ToSeek
2006-Sep-03, 03:11 PM
SMART-1 Space Probe Slams into the Moon (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/060903_smart-1_impact.html)


Koschny said that the impact occurred within seconds of the predicted time. The impact was indicated by the loss of communication from the craft, which was destroyed. Impact was at 1:42 a.m. ET.

"They went out with a bang," said Bruce Betts of the Planetary Society.

The high-speed slam dunk was expected to create yet another crater on the Moon—perhaps some 16 feet to 33 feet (5-10 meters) across. Dust and other material ejected off the Moon were expected to possibly be visible to observers with big telescopes back here on Earth.

A flash from the impact was recorded by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope atop Mauna Kea, but no details were available at the time this update was published. The image is here.

A handful of reporters and astronomers using large backyard telescopes in California, Colorado and Washington state did not see anything in the initial moments after the impact.

andyschlei
2006-Sep-03, 03:17 PM
I could be totally wrong here but I believe I saw the flash of impact last night.

I was observing from the Anza Valley (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=Anza,+CA+92539&ie=UTF8&z=12&ll=33.582877,-116.7136&spn=0.120413,0.33783&om=1&iwloc=A) in Southern California at about 3,400' altitude. The flash was well into the dark area of the Moon where it was advertised to be. It was faint and short. It came a little later than expected -- it impacted at 05:42:21 UT (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39961), initial estimates (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/30aug_smart1.htm) were 05:41.

I was observing with an 8" SCT and a 35mm plossl.

I don't think I was imagining things, but I haven't seen any independent statistics that would confirm that I could have seen it.

--Andy
---------------
Observatorio de la Ballona (http://www.obsballona.org/)

Launch window
2006-Sep-04, 12:45 AM
I could be totally wrong here but I believe I saw the flash of impact last night.


I don't think I was imagining things, but I haven't seen any independent

It sounds like you may have seen it, did you have time to take a photo ??

andyschlei
2006-Sep-04, 01:26 AM
It sounds like you may have seen it, did you have time to take a photo ??

No, I was running purely on visual. I am not at my usual viewing site or I would have set up my ToUCam Pro.

Launch window
2006-Sep-04, 03:51 PM
andyschlei, well its great that you've seen it but a pity you got no pic

Contour Plot of Impact Flash
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=39964
The SMART-1 spacecraft slammed into volcanic plain called the Lake of Excellence at 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) per second right on time. The impact was captured by observers on Earth, and scientists hoped the resulting cloud of dust and debris would provide clues to the geologic composition of the site.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14646238/
Photos by AMIE camera prior to Moon impact
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM2N58ZMRE_index_1.html

ToSeek
2006-Sep-05, 12:47 AM
SMART-1 swan song: valuable data until final moments (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMC378ZMRE_index_0.html)


Right up to its final orbits, SMART-1 continued delivering valuable data, extending the mission's legacy as a technology and scientific success. Scientists and engineers met today at ESOC to review mission achievements including final AMIE camera images.

At a press event held today at ESA's Spacecraft Operations Centre (ESOC), SMART-1 engineers, operations experts and scientists are presenting data and preliminary results obtained by the spacecraft prior to its impact on the Moon at 07:42 CEST, 3 September 2006.
Perhaps the most sentimental image sequence was taken by AMIE just four days before impact, on 29 August at 21:00 CEST (19:00 UT), when the camera was pointed back towards the Earth to capture, in the best tradition of many previous lunar missions, a view of our home planet. The sequence of images is centred over Brazil at approximately 44.9º West and 19.2º South (North is to the left). The Kourou area in French Guiana, from where SMART-1 was launched in 2003, is also visible.

Lots of cool imagery at the link.

mantiss
2006-Sep-05, 02:08 PM
Short movie (http://www.cfht.hawaii.edu/News/Smart1/) showing the dust/debris expansion just after the impact, from CFHT

Nicolas
2006-Sep-05, 03:10 PM
BOOM

I like how you see the dust spreading in the DOF.

Damburger
2006-Sep-06, 07:29 AM
This was an excellent mission, very cheap for what it did and testing out a new technology.

I'm hoping the experience with SMART will encourage other low-cost moon missions.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-06, 09:16 AM
It tested out an armada of new technologies (for ESA). But the engine got the majority of media attention.

Launch window
2006-Sep-07, 02:25 AM
It tested out an armada of new technologies (for ESA). But the engine got the majority of media attention.


some great information here

ESA's Portable-document-format on the smart1 mission
Science objective
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/multimedia/smart-1/03_SMART-1_Science-Objectives_Summary.pdf
Spectrometer Results on pdf
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/multimedia/smart-1/05_SMART-1_D-CIXS-Spectrometer-Results.pdf
AMIE Cam
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/multimedia/smart-1/04_SMART-1_AMIE-Camera-Results.pdf

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Sep-12, 02:12 AM
SMART-1 impact simulated in a laboratory sand-box

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM8SH7LURE_index_0.html

...Burchell and Cole also observed a 'ricochet-projectile' phenomenon, suggesting a bounce like that of a single object that had undergone some deformation, with a slight 20 percent loss of speed during the impact.

"Based on the latest topography analysis, SMART-1 touched down with a very grazing incidence not higher than a few degrees," said Foing. "Therefore it might have bounced in a similar way to the flying bullet in the sand box, like a stone skipping on water."

"The result of these simulations may explain some of the properties of the clouds detected by the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) up to 100 seconds after the flash," added Pascale Ehrenfreund, coordinator of the SMART-1 impact ground-based observation campaign. "These were spread at some tens of kilometres downstream from impact," she concluded.

01101001
2006-Oct-20, 06:53 PM
SMART-1 lives!

No, but the ESA is still publishing new information from Smart-1.

Shackleton crater: SMART-1’s search for light, shadow and ice at lunar South Pole (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMP7QOFHTE_index_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/AMI_EAE3_001775_00002_00020_M.jpg (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMP7QOFHTE_index_0.html)


SMART-1 also made long repeated exposures to see inside the shadowed areas. The purpose was detecting the very weak reflected light from the crater rims, and therefore study the surface reflection properties (albedo) and its spectral variations (mineralogical composition). These properties could reveal patchy ice surface layers inside the crater.

On the 2-kilometre wide inner edge of the crater ridge, at times barely visible from Earth, astronomers using ground radio-telescopes have recently reported they were not able to detect a distinctive signature of thick deposits of ice in the area. Earlier measurements by NASA's Lunar Prospector reported of hydrogen enhancement over large shadowed areas.

"We still do not know if this hydrogen is due to enhanced trapping of solar wind, or to the water ice brought on the Moon by the bombardment of comets and asteroids," says Bernard Foing, ESA's SMART-1 Project Scientist. "These bodies may have deposited on the Moon patchy layers of ice filling about 1.5 percent of the areas in permanent shadow, down to one metre below the surface."

ToSeek
2007-Feb-01, 06:55 PM
How SMART-1 Has Made European Space Exploration Smarter (http://www.moondaily.com/reports/How_SMART_1_Has_Made_European_Space_Exploration_Sm arter_999.html)


A unique way to travel to the Moon, new technologies successfully tested and brand-new science: a few months after the end of the SMART-1 mission scientists and engineers gathered to recap on these and all the other achievements of the first European mission to the Moon.

The innovative SMART-1 Moon mission has taught ESA, European space industry and institutes a lot about how to perform its missions even more efficiently. For example, the operational tools developed and the lessons learned are already being used on ESA missions such as Rosetta and Venus Express. The SMART-1 experience has also been used to prepare future ESA missions, such as Bepi-Colombo, which will visit the inner planet Mercury.

Argos
2007-Feb-03, 02:36 PM
Dear Colleagues,


Please, check the news data and news time, images and graphics updated for lunar impact of the SMART-1 in the homepage of the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project, in the Lunar Section of the Rede de Astronomia Observacional REA – BRAZIL.

These are the last orbit prediction we have for SMART-1.

English Version: http://slrea-smart1lunar-impact-project-ing.blogspot.com/


Best regards,

Valmir Martins de Morais- valmirmmorais@yahoo.com.br
Coordinator for the SL/REA SMART-1 Lunar Impact Project - Secção Lunar REA/BRAZIL
Member of the Moon SMART Impact: Predictions and Observation Campaign.

Nice to meet you here, Valmir. Hope you can contribute more to this forum. We need more Brazucas. :)

Greetings from Bauru.

ToSeek
2007-Sep-06, 08:47 PM
SMART-1: Europe on the Moon, one year on (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMWH5MPQ5F_index_0.html)


A year ago, as Europe reached the Moon for the first time, scientists on Earth eagerly watched SMART-1’s spectacular impact. New results from the impact analysis and from the instruments still keep coming.

One year on, we present ongoing scientific highlights of the mission. The analysis of data and simulations of the satellite’s impact provide clues on the dynamics of the ejecta after the flash, along with laboratory experiments or modelling of impacts. The experience gained is being put to good use in preparation for future missions.

ToSeek
2007-Dec-05, 06:20 PM
SMART-1: Travel maps of the lunar north pole (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-12/esa-stm120507.php)


A new map obtained with SMART-1 data shows the geography and illumination of the lunar north pole. Such maps will be of great use for future lunar explorers.

The lunar poles are very interesting for future science and exploration of the Moon mainly because of their exposure to sunlight. They display areas of quasi-eternal light, have a stable thermal environment and are close to dark areas that could host water ice – potential future lunar base sites.

The SMART-1 north pole map, covering an area of about 800 by 600 km, shows geographical locations of some craters of interest. Peary is a large impact crater closest to the north pole. At this latitude the interior of the crater receives little sunlight, but SMART-1 was able to observe it during phases when the crater floor was sufficiently illuminated for imaging.