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Tom Mazanec
2015-Mar-26, 04:44 AM
have to contemplate winning the Darwin Award after going through the window, taking into account gravitational acceleration and wind resistance?

http://www.snopes.com/horrors/freakish/window.asp

Cougar
2015-Mar-26, 12:42 PM
Not very long.

Grey
2015-Mar-26, 02:09 PM
Assuming about 3 meters per floor, that comes in just under 4 seconds, neglecting air resistance. Impact would therefore be at about 40 meters per second. Terminal velocity is about 55 m/s, so that's close enough that air resistance is relevant, but not huge. Maybe he got another second or two.

DaveC426913
2015-Mar-26, 02:43 PM
Funny, I was just thinking about this incident the other day.

I suppose that's not entirely coincidental. I am - even as I type this - looking at the TD Tower of Death, not 425 yards directly in front of me, as I have every week day for the last year.
:waves:



20390

grant hutchison
2015-Mar-28, 12:16 AM
Assuming about 3 meters per floor, that comes in just under 4 seconds, neglecting air resistance. Impact would therefore be at about 40 meters per second. Terminal velocity is about 55 m/s, so that's close enough that air resistance is relevant, but not huge. Maybe he got another second or two.Your figure for terminal velocity is for the sky-diving starfish position. You could double that for a head-down position. In practice, I'd guess people who fall out of high windows don't usually manage to stabilize before they hit the ground, and are unlikely to assume a starfish position except transiently. So four seconds is probably as good an estimate as we're going to get.

Grant Hutchison

Tom Mazanec
2015-Mar-28, 12:44 PM
Just imagine being Hoy, and count out "Mississippi-one, Mississippi-two, Mississippi-three, Mississippi-four". It may have not been very long, Cougar, but it may have seemed long...

DaveC426913
2015-Mar-28, 01:39 PM
Your figure for terminal velocity is for the sky-diving starfish position. You could double that for a head-down position. In practice, I'd guess people who fall out of high windows don't usually manage to stabilize before they hit the ground, and are unlikely to assume a starfish position except transiently. So four seconds is probably as good an estimate as we're going to get.

Grant Hutchison

Maybe he rode the window panel like a kite all the way down. :)

Jens
2015-Mar-28, 02:31 PM
And being a lawyer, he was probably thinking of who would be found responsible.

grant hutchison
2015-Mar-28, 03:05 PM
Just imagine being Hoy, and count out "Mississippi-one, Mississippi-two, Mississippi-three, Mississippi-four". It may have not been very long, Cougar, but it may have seemed long...You can certainly think a lot of stuff in four stressful seconds, as your physiology lights up with adrenaline. Experience suggests it can be quite calm and sometimes inconsequential.
When I fell end over end down a steep hillside in the English Lake District (a process that probably took no more than a few seconds to complete), I had time for:
1) An internal debate about whether I should stop using my arms to cover my head and use them to try to arrest my fall. (In fact, my body was doing its own thing at this point, and I seemed to have no real control over what my arms were doing.)
2) An attempt to recall if anyone on the path below had been looking in my direction as I started to fall.
3) The realization that I knew a doctor who worked at the nearest hospital.
4) A mental note that I would need to buy a new walking pole if I survived, because I had just landed on top of one and bent it out of shape.
5) A dreamlike worry about whether I now had several broken ribs on one side, or a smaller number of broken ribs on each side (when I felt the second crack from my chest, I couldn't recall which side the first crack had come from).

My father crashed his Thunderbolt into trees when it lost power on take-off with a full load of bombs and fuel. He had time to make his Mayday call, crack the canopy, tighten his harness and turn off the fuel pump, and he was still floating along above the trees. He told me he could remember thinking, "I'm going to be up here all day at this rate." And then, "It's amazing how quiet it is." Then he made a mental note that he would be charged for the loss of a parachute, so he should take that with him when he exited the aircraft. And he wondered how far he would need to run from the crash site before it would be safe to have a cigarette. Then he realized he didn't have any cigarettes with him, and wondered if any of his likely rescuers would bring cigarettes. (All this in a plane that had, with almost no power, already clipped the tops of the trees at the end of the runway with its undercarriage.)

Grant Hutchison

Torsten
2015-Mar-28, 10:50 PM
Grant, I had a similar fall (well, more a slide) on a mountainside when I was a teenager, but fewer thoughts went through my mind!

My nephew fell four stories when part of a scaffold at a construction site failed. He said he had time to think "This isn't happening..." Fortunately for him, he landed in a pile of sand, the only piece of ground that wasn't covered in hard or sharp-edged construction materials. He broke some bones.

I was charged by a large black bear in 2011. The encounter was very short, but long enough for this sequence of thoughts and actions:
1) Upon hearing rustling and breaking of branches, I think "moose" (having encountered one earlier in the day).
1) I see the bear, and think "Grizzly!".
3) I hear the growling and see the teeth, realize it's coming for me, and think "This is real".
4) I holler "Hey!", and commence with my own growling (crazy instinctive response, go figure...) while pulling out the bear spray.
The situation ended in about 4 seconds when the bear changed direction and ran out of sight.

starcanuck64
2015-Mar-29, 12:22 AM
One of my brushes involved sitting in the front of an adrift zodiac in the middle of Active Pass with three ferries coming two from Swartz Bay and one from Tsawwassan. The nearest ferry was only seconds away and I was going through coldly in my mind what it would be like to first be hit by the bow of the boat, then scrape along the bottom to finally be shredded by the propellers. I imagined it all in detail, including how sharp the barnacles on the hull would be...then my friend in the stern running the boat managed to get the engine going.