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View Full Version : Putting Ceres into Mars orbit (a new moon for Mars)...



Sonny
2015-Mar-29, 07:15 AM
Guys,

I believe that if we managed to put Ceres into Mars orbit, that move will warms up Mars' core and will reactivate its magnetosphere.

What do you guys think? How much energy will be needed to make this to happen?

In what distance Ceres needs to be from Mars? So it can reactivate Mars core...

Later, we talk about howto drop oceans of water into Mars surface... :p

Cheers!
Thiago

Jens
2015-Mar-30, 02:43 AM
Well, it's like a quintillion tons (that's 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 tons), so a LOT of energy will be required to do anything. And the velocity is about 19 km/s, versus 24 km/s for Mars. So you'll have to speed it up by 5 km/s. The ISS goes about 7 km/s, so it's about in the same ballpark. So it's going take a REAL LOT of energy.

Certassar
2015-Apr-08, 02:17 PM
Perhaps it would be easier to kick-start the marsian magnetosphere like they did in the film "The Core". All we need is an expendable crew and some unobtainium... :whistle:

cjameshuff
2015-Apr-08, 04:46 PM
Ceres is the largest planetoid in the inner solar system, but still rather small. Earth is about 80 times the mass of the moon, Mars is about 700 times the mass of Ceres. You could put it in a very low and fast orbit, but I doubt it'd ever achieve the needed amounts of tidal heating. It certainly wouldn't be fast.

You're somewhat asking the wrong question, though. The heating of the interior of Mars would be through tidal effects, which would cause the orbit of Ceres to decay. So your job isn't over when you get Ceres into Mars orbit, you need to keep pumping energy in to maintain its orbit as its orbital energy gets converted into heat. Heating up the core of a planet 700 times the mass of Ceres would take a great deal of energy.

Also, in the end, it'll just do what it did the first time it had a molten core. It'll take constant work to maintain a terraformed Mars anyway, so you might as well use a more direct approach. If you can deliver the needed atmosphere and water to Mars in the first place, you really don't need a magnetic field.

Noclevername
2015-Apr-08, 09:46 PM
Magnetospheres are overrated. Atmospheres are much better protection from cosmic rays. And people tend to over-estimate the amount of gas solar wind carries off. Most of Mars' losses were due to its low gravity, not because the solar particles are atmospheric super-strippers. A magnetic field would not have helped Mars very much.

Warren Platts
2015-Apr-10, 07:29 AM
The thing to do IMO would be to crash Ceres into Mars. The impact would create a lot of short term heat, and then you'd have an actual atmosphere and some oceans.

Glom
2015-Apr-10, 09:09 AM
Somewhat melodramatic. I thought the main goal of getting an asteroid into Martian orbit was to be a counterweight for Orbital tether.

Noclevername
2015-Apr-10, 04:25 PM
The thing to do IMO would be to crash Ceres into Mars. The impact would create a lot of short term heat, and then you'd have an actual atmosphere and some oceans.

But then you'd have a multi-million-year wait until it could be made livable, which kind of runs counter to the goal of terraforming.

Warren Platts
2015-Apr-10, 07:27 PM
But then you'd have a multi-million-year wait until it could be made livable, which kind of runs counter to the goal of terraforming.

You really think that it would take millions of years for things to settle down? I would think it would be like instant ecosystem. Maybe a few decades at most for the dust to settle out. You'd have an instant ocean and atmosphere. What I would like to do is draw what the ocean would look like. Might make a cool scifi story if nothing else...

Warren Platts
2015-Apr-10, 07:41 PM
Somewhat melodramatic. I thought the main goal of getting an asteroid into Martian orbit was to be a counterweight for Orbital tether.

That's what Phobos and Deimos are for! :)

Noclevername
2015-Apr-10, 08:33 PM
You really think that it would take millions of years for things to settle down? I would think it would be like instant ecosystem. Maybe a few decades at most for the dust to settle out. You'd have an instant ocean and atmosphere. What I would like to do is draw what the ocean would look like. Might make a cool scifi story if nothing else...

The huge amounts of orbital energy discussed above? They all go instantly into Mars' surface, rather than gradually into its core. The resulting heat would probably be Mars' Big Whack equivalent, resulting in a molten surface at minimum.

eburacum45
2015-Apr-10, 08:37 PM
What I would like to do is draw what the ocean would look like. Might make a cool scifi story if nothing else...
Do you mean what shape the ocean would be? Here's my version
http://www.orionsarm.com/im_store/greenmars.jpg
there are others

http://www.caelusgreenroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/mars_wallpaper.jpg
and so on

Warren Platts
2015-Apr-13, 06:55 PM
Do you mean what shape the ocean would be? Here's my version
http://www.orionsarm.com/im_store/greenmars.jpg
there are others

http://www.caelusgreenroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/mars_wallpaper.jpg
and so on

Very cool! Do you know if that's based on the expected water content of Ceres, or are these ancient oceans?

Noclevername
2015-Apr-14, 08:39 PM
Very cool! Do you know if that's based on the expected water content of Ceres, or are these ancient oceans?

None of them are based on Ceres, I believe they're predictions for a terraformed Mars.