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skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 08:19 PM
See link for RedNova Below

There are a lot of Science Facts having to do with astronomy that need Bad Astronomy Attn:

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 08:21 PM
Source-RedNova
http://rednova.com/science/facts_figures/science_facts/

Nicolas
2005-Jan-19, 08:27 PM
YEt again: BABB records: longest post :D

Wolverine
2005-Jan-19, 08:29 PM
Wouldn't it have been better to just post the URL? :-s


© 2002-2004 RedNova.com. All rights reserved.

Kebsis
2005-Jan-19, 08:33 PM
Well I can't read all of them now but I spotted a few that were wrong and a couple that are sketchy. A quarter of the worlds plants will not be extinct by 2010 (that sounds like something they would be saying in the early 90's, I suspect they have probably pushed the deadline back a decade or so by now). Whales can be heard very far away, but that is helped by the fact that they are under water. While their songs can be heard far away I doubt it would blow your eardrums out (metaphorically speaking) if you were swimming next to one like some sonic booming jet engines and powerful rocket engines would. I would file that one under 'sketchy'.

edit: and is putting on perfume really worth it when you're covered in vasaline? :o

ToSeek
2005-Jan-19, 08:59 PM
I would like to volunteer to help with a study to test this one:


* More germs are transferred shaking hands than kissing.

:D

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 09:06 PM
Wouldn't it have been better to just post the URL? :-s


© 2002-2004 RedNova.com. All rights reserved.

I did and would people actually click on it. The 'Facts' proposed are to me very dated and there is no way to seek updates at the source so I offered it up for discussion due to the presence of Astronomy 'Facts'.

I haven't even read "ALL" of them yet! LoL

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 09:11 PM
Well I can't read all of them now but I spotted a few that were wrong and a couple that are sketchy. A quarter of the worlds plants will not be extinct by 2010 (that sounds like something they would be saying in the early 90's, I suspect they have probably pushed the deadline back a decade or so by now). Whales can be heard very far away, but that is helped by the fact that they are under water. While their songs can be heard far away I doubt it would blow your eardrums out (metaphorically speaking) if you were swimming next to one like some sonic booming jet engines and powerful rocket engines would. I would file that one under 'sketchy'.

edit: and is putting on perfume really worth it when you're covered in vasaline? :o

I would tend to say that MORE than a FEW are wrong. It is a nice place to start "BAD" Anything science topics tho.
I wish there was a fact date for each so we could determine the change in a period of time.
Like- "In 1978 there were umteen billion geeks / In 2005 there were 2, me and u"
LoL

Jigsaw
2005-Jan-19, 09:21 PM
Dude, next time, maybe just Copy and Paste the relevant astronomy factoids?

Normandy6644
2005-Jan-19, 09:47 PM
That list just went on and on and on....

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:32 PM
Hey, I'm sorry...To make you feel better I post this site in retaliation

http://www.atw.co.za/end.html

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:33 PM
Dude, next time, maybe just Copy and Paste the relevant astronomy factoids?

Yeah, I should have filtered it a bit. Sorry

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:34 PM
That list just went on and on and on....


Like my wife= Nag, nag, nag....

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:38 PM
NASA missions in 2003 and 2005 will collect rocks from Mars.

Opportunity and Spirit only 'examine' the rocks. I don't think they are collecting samples are they? I don't think there is a return mission to Mars scheduled for this year is there?

By 'return mission' I mean go and come back with samples.

paulie jay
2005-Jan-19, 10:42 PM
I don't see what Bob Geldof and the Boomtown Rats have to do with science. Or the point of the post quite fankly.

Zachary
2005-Jan-19, 10:43 PM
* The more than 1,000 disorders of the brain and nervous system result in more hospitalizations than any other disease group, including cancer and heart disease. Neurological illnesses affect more than 50 million Americans annually at costs exceeding 0 billion.


Now that's a lot of money :lol:

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:44 PM
* The more than 1,000 disorders of the brain and nervous system result in more hospitalizations than any other disease group, including cancer and heart disease. Neurological illnesses affect more than 50 million Americans annually at costs exceeding 0 billion.


Now that's a lot of money :lol:

:lol:

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-19, 10:51 PM
I don't see what Bob Geldof and the Boomtown Rats have to do with science. Or the point of the post quite fankly.

socialogy(probably spelled it wrong) study of society and the human condition

point of me posting, talk about how much more we now know and ponder what we will know.

at the time this was created I figure it was current knowledge limits, now there are new knowledge limits, in 5 years many of the things we consider fact today will be just as silly as these.

Wolverine
2005-Jan-19, 11:14 PM
Wouldn't it have been better to just post the URL? :-s


© 2002-2004 RedNova.com. All rights reserved.

I did and would people actually click on it.

Honestly, it's not a matter of whether people will click on it or not, it's a matter of abiding by the board's FAQ (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/faq.php#0):


Do not post copyrighted material here. It is within the law to post small, relevant quotes, but not whole passages from newspapers, magazines, books, etc. If you do, the post will be deleted, and you will be warned. This is very serious. I won't have anyone breaking the law on my site, especially copyright laws. Do it twice and you will be banned.

Trebuchet
2005-Jan-20, 12:11 AM
This reminds me we haven't heard from the BA for a few days. I expect he's been at The Amazing Meeting but I think it was over several days ago.

Nowhere Man
2005-Jan-20, 12:47 AM
He's back. At least, back enough to move Jerry's "Huygens was really a failure" threads to ATM.

Fred

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-20, 01:22 AM
And ban nyx. skwirlinator better hide the copyrighted material!

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-20, 02:35 AM
I am sorry - I thought it was open because no author was noted

Kebsis
2005-Jan-20, 03:36 AM
I am sorry - I thought it was open because no author was noted

It's not a problem...just edit the post. Delete all the list and replace it with a link.

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-20, 05:55 AM
I am sorry - I thought it was open because no author was noted

It's not a problem...just edit the post. Delete all the list and replace it with a link.

Done, Again I meant no Offence, It was a learning experiance I have learned. I guess I need to proof read and only Quote what I actually need.
I was having trouble with quoting and I thought all would be best. Warning acknowledged.

beskeptical
2005-Jan-20, 07:03 AM
* The more than 1,000 disorders of the brain and nervous system result in more hospitalizations than any other disease group, including cancer and heart disease. Neurological illnesses affect more than 50 million Americans annually at costs exceeding 0 billion.
I don't buy that one at all, even if it is only 0 billion. I've spent enough time working in hospitals to say heart diseases, lung diseases, and cancer dominate the scene. Surgery for all sorts of anatomical repairs is pretty high up there as well.

beskeptical
2005-Jan-20, 07:11 AM
I would like to volunteer to help with a study to test this one:


* More germs are transferred shaking hands than kissing.

:DDon't ya wanna know what the rest of the subjects look like first?http://d21c.com/terri1/people/ugly.jpg

Kidding aside, I'd say hands collect and transmit more organisms than kissing but I'm not sure just the germs from handshakes alone would exceed kissing.

The most common infectious diseases are fecal-oral transmission. That includes oral-oral. But then they didn't say disease causing germs.

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-20, 07:02 PM
Ok here are some of the Astronomy 'Facts'

The largest galaxies contain a million, million stars.

The Universe contains over 100 billion galaxies.

A thimbleful of a neutron star would weigh over 100 million tons.

The risk of being struck by a falling meteorite for a human is one occurrence every 9,300 years.

The largest meteorite craters in the world are in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada and in Vredefort, South Africa.

To escape the Earth's gravity a rocket need to travel at 7 miles a second.

If every star in the Milky Way was a grain of salt they would fill an Olympic sized swimming pool.

A lunar eclipse of 1 hour 47 minutes occurred on the 16th July 2000.

Saturn would float if you could find an ocean big enough.

A neutron star is 15 miles across and weighs more than the Sun.
The research spacecraft Helios B came within a record 27 million miles of the Sun.
65 million years ago the impact of an asteroid is estimated to have had the power of 10 million H-Bombs.
The temperature at the centre of the Earth is estimated to be 5500 degrees Celsius.
There are over 100 billion stars in our Milky Way Galaxy.
Scientists have discovered over 20 planets outside our solar system.
There is clear geological evidence that there has been water on Mars.
NASA missions in 2003 and 2005 will collect rocks from Mars.
Jupiter's moon, Europa, is completely covered in ice.
We can produce laser light a million times brighter than sunshine.
The fastest spacecraft can go 40,000 mph.
The surface of Mars is the same area as the Earth's continents.
Volcanoes on Io eject material at speeds of 2000 mph.
The Sun takes about 220 million years to make one revolution of the Milky Way.
The Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET) can collect light 2 million times fainter than the human eye can.
Galileo first saw the moons of Jupiter on 7th January 1610 - but they had been discovered a few days earlier by an obscure German Astronomer, Simon Marius.
97.2% of the Earth's water is salt water.
Traveling at the speed of light it would take a spaceship just 1.2822 seconds to reach the Moon.
The speed of light, Warp Factor 1 on Star Trek's Enterprise is a mind boggling 670,610,000 miles per hour.
The interstellar gas cloud Sagittarius B contains a billion, billion, billion liters of alcohol.
In Winter the Antarctic Ice covers 10% of our planet.
It takes the Earth exactly 365.24219 days to orbit the Sun - and that is why every four years we need a leap year.
The longest space flight by a women lasted a total of 188 days, 4 hours and 14 seconds.
The biggest star has a diameter of 1800 million miles, making it 2000 times bigger than the Sun.
The next total eclipse visible from the UK mainland will be on the 23rd September 2090.

The International Space Station orbits at 248 miles above the Earth.

The Large Hadron Collider or LHC outside of Geneva in Switzerland will be the largest science experiment ever. When it opens for business in 2005 it will use a circular tunnel 17 miles in diameter.

The temperature on the surface of Mercury exceeds 400 degrees C during the day, and, at night, plummets to minus 200 degrees centigrade.
A green flash is sometimes seen just as the sun sets or rises. This occurs because green light is bent most strongly by the atmosphere. So the green is seen before other colors at sunrise, and after the other colors have vanished at sunset.
Mark Twain was born on a day in 1835 when Halley’s Comet came into view. When he died in 1910, Halley’s came into view again.
Moon was Buzz Aldrin's mother's maiden name. (Buzz Aldrin was the second man on the moon in 1969)

It was discovered on a space mission that a frog can throw up. The frog throws up it's stomach first, so the stomach is dangling out of it's mouth. Then the frog uses its forearms to dig out all of the stomach's contents and then swallows the stomach back down again.

If the Arctic ice cap were to melt, the sea level would rise by an average of 230 feet.

A pinhead-sized piece of a neutron star weighs 1 million tons.
If emissions of carbon dioxide were halted today, it would take more than a century for the atmospheric level of carbon dioxide to approach its pre-industrial level.
The coldest known star is an unnamed star about 160 light years from Earth. Its surface temperature is only 2600F which is 7400F cooler than the Sun!
The largest known Nebula (cloud of gas and dust) is the Tarantula Nebula, named for its shape.
Our Galaxy's oldest stars are Red Dwarfs, which are also the smallest and most abundant, numbering 70% of the Galaxy's Stars.
The highest point on Mars is the Olympus Mons Volcano, which has a 50-mile wide summit and rises 13? miles above a lava-strewn plain.
The 'Red Planet' isn't really red at all, NASA photographs indicate that it is more of a tan or butterscotch color.

A Martian day is surprisingly similar in length to one on Earth (24 hours and 37 minutes), but a Martian year is nearly twice as long (687 days).
Johannes Kepler used the recorded movement of Mars to formulate his three laws of planetary motion in the 17th Century, which laid the foundation for modern Astronomy.
Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin ate roasted turkey from foil packets at their first meal on the moon.

Source: http://rednova.com/science/facts_figures/science_facts/

I imagine MOST of these are fairly accurate. However I am pretty sure there are a few that have changed. This post is to discuss the ones that have changed or the ones that are inaccurate. We should also consider those that MAY change in the next 5-10 years.

Nicolas
2005-Jan-20, 07:23 PM
[never mind, I misread]

ChesleyFan
2005-Jan-20, 08:14 PM
The highest speed ever achieved on a bicycle is 166.94 mph by Fred Rompelburg.

He was also the last person to attempt to jump the Grand Canyon on a bike.


65 million years ago the impact of an asteroid is estimated to have had the power of 10 million H-Bombs.

So how much damage would an asteroid do today then?


Scientists have discovered over 20 planets outside our solar system

Dang, how old IS this thing? I think that number is about six times greater now.


On average women say 7,000 words per day. Men manage just over 2000

That's all we manage to get in edgewise.


Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox, Unix is a registered trademark of AT&T

Wha...?

SeanF
2005-Jan-20, 08:32 PM
Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox, Unix is a registered trademark of AT&T
Wha...?
Just change "is" to "was" and they're okay . . . :)

skwirlinator
2005-Jan-20, 11:59 PM
He was also the last person to attempt to jump the Grand Canyon on a bike.

Sounds like it was his 'last' jump!

Kebsis
2005-Jan-21, 04:13 AM
So how much damage would an asteroid do today then?


What do you mean? It's talking about a specific asteroid, the one that theoretically killed the dinosaurs.

And the 10 million figure seems to be a bit of a lowball.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-21, 05:47 AM
Ok here are some of the Astronomy 'Facts'

It takes the Earth exactly 365.24219 days to orbit the Sun - and that is why every four years we need a leap year.

Exactly? It's closer to 365.25 days than it is to 365.24219 days :)

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jan-21, 06:03 AM
Well, we know where the value came from (http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=1+year+in+days&meta=).

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-21, 06:10 AM
Well, we know where the value came from (http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=1+year+in+days&meta=).
I clicked on the link, and google came back with 365.242199, which has another 9--so I doubt they were using google to arrive at that exact value. :)

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jan-21, 06:15 AM
Wow. I didn't even see that extra 9. I'm now going to try to extract my foot from my mouth.






I need sleep.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-21, 06:28 AM
LOL, sorry. I was kinda kidding anyway. The actual value (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=56095#56095) is closer to 365.2563604 days--about twenty minutes longer than that 365.242199 days figure.

Fram
2005-Jan-21, 10:49 AM
The risk of being struck by a falling meteorite for a human is one occurrence every 9,300 years.

A. Do they mean one occurrence for every human, or one occurrence in all of humanity? My English isn't good enough to make that distinction.

B. Anyway, they both are very debatable. If it is once in 9300 years per human, that means every human has a 1 in 150 chance of being struck in his lifetime (more or less, taking 60 years as life expectancy). This is ridiculous, the chances have to be much much lower.
On the other hand, if it is for the whole of humanity, this is nonsense. For one, the number of humans isn't constant, so the chance isn't either. And secondly, it has happened this century (two or three times at least), and there is no reason to believe this is a freak run that is statistically insignificant.

I like the term 'falling meteorite' though. :D

Fram
2005-Jan-21, 10:55 AM
To escape the Earth's gravity a rocket need to travel at 7 miles a second.

... or have some acceleration. The escape velocity only counts when you don't want to use any power after you reached a certain speed. You can leave Earth's gravity while doing 7 miles an hour as well, you just need a way to maintain that speed.

Fram
2005-Jan-21, 11:03 AM
Mark Twain was born on a day in 1835 when Halley’s Comet came into view. When he died in 1910, Halley’s came into view again.

He was born six months before perihelion 1835, and he died one day after perihelion 1910. So certainly in 1910, the comet was more than just 'coming into view again'. Basically, he was born and died in two years that saw Halley's comet appear, and that's all there is to it.

pghnative
2005-Jan-21, 03:08 PM
Mark Twain was born on a day in 1835 when Halley’s Comet came into view. When he died in 1910, Halley’s came into view again.

He was born six months before perihelion 1835, and he died one day after perihelion 1910. So certainly in 1910, the comet was more than just 'coming into view again'. Basically, he was born and died in two years that saw Halley's comet appear, and that's all there is to it.

One could interpret their statement another way, a way which would be truthful. On the days that Mark Twain was born and died, (ahem) Comet Halley came into view. It also came into view the night before, and the night before that, etc...

In fact, I suspect that their wording was deliberate.

ChesleyFan
2005-Jan-21, 05:15 PM
So how much damage would an asteroid do today then?


What do you mean? It's talking about a specific asteroid, the one that theoretically killed the dinosaurs.

And the 10 million figure seems to be a bit of a lowball.

The way it's phrased it sounds like "an asteroid" 65 million years ago would have done X amount of damage. It's like when someone says a gallon of gas was 39 cents in 1969. At least, that's the way I initially read it.