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Inclusa
2015-May-15, 06:16 AM
From aronia berries, acai berries, goji berries, golden berries, hemp seeds, tiger nuts, cacao, etc, there have been hype about them and controversies.
They may be healthy, but some of them are not meant for daily consumptions, though.
Cacao in its purest form is a powerful stimulant, and it probably shouldn't be used on a daily basis.
The berries seem quite safe, but I guess "overdoses" can happen.
The remark is that they might have certain impacts, but the impacts can be negligible.

Noclevername
2015-May-15, 09:52 AM
"Superfood" is not a meaningful term, it's an advertising buzzword. So any food given that label is automatically being over-rated.

Any food with a moderate benefit in nutrients is being called a "superfood" by someone these days.

profloater
2015-May-15, 03:07 PM
Is there a question here? I guess superfoods are a way of dividing food as fuel from food as a drug. A drug alters your metabolism without being a food. So my favourite "superfood" is probably garlic. Did you see a revived ancient remedy for eye sores was found to beat MRSA? The main ingredient, (or at least one of the ingredients) was garlic. It's surely a good thing that we all start to realise that food is not just fuel? So I see the general trend as positive.

Inclusa
2015-May-16, 03:39 AM
Is there a question here? I guess superfoods are a way of dividing food as fuel from food as a drug. A drug alters your metabolism without being a food. So my favourite "superfood" is probably garlic. Did you see a revived ancient remedy for eye sores was found to beat MRSA? The main ingredient, (or at least one of the ingredients) was garlic. It's surely a good thing that we all start to realise that food is not just fuel? So I see the general trend as positive.

Food certainly isn't just fuel or nutrients, and a balanced diet is more important than a diet filled with so-called "superfoods". Just a reminder: many foods have certain health (or even medical) benefits.


"Superfood" is not a meaningful term, it's an advertising buzzword. So any food given that label is automatically being over-rated.

Any food with a moderate benefit in nutrients is being called a "superfood" by someone these days.

We should not call anything superfoods, though.

gzhpcu
2015-May-16, 06:30 AM
Is there a question here? I guess superfoods are a way of dividing food as fuel from food as a drug. A drug alters your metabolism without being a food. So my favourite "superfood" is probably garlic. Did you see a revived ancient remedy for eye sores was found to beat MRSA? The main ingredient, (or at least one of the ingredients) was garlic. It's surely a good thing that we all start to realise that food is not just fuel? So I see the general trend as positive.I absolutely love garlic, but the downside is the effect on one's breath, otherwise I would use it much more often.

malaidas
2015-May-16, 07:57 AM
the key is to remove the green bit gzhpcu.

I use garlic regularly in my cooking, love it. Only thing more quintesential to me are all forms of peppers

swampyankee
2015-May-16, 01:26 PM
Probably the closest thing to a true superfood is citrus, the variety of fruit that helped the RN rule the World's oceans for over a century. Of course, there was a lot more to the RN's long-term supremacy.

NEOWatcher
2015-May-17, 01:39 AM
Probably the closest thing to a true superfood is citrus, the variety of fruit that helped the RN rule the World's oceans for over a century. Of course, there was a lot more to the RN's long-term supremacy.
RN: Royal Navy?

swampyankee
2015-May-17, 03:10 AM
RN: Royal Navy?

Yes. British Royal Navy.

malaidas
2015-May-18, 09:59 PM
Ah ha someone who knows that tomatoes are pronounced tomartoes lol. Sorry but ba k on topic now, the above are another example of a great food substance that have been put under GM category,

Inclusa
2015-May-20, 05:00 AM
Dubbing blueberries, saskatoon berries, or aronia berries (I use these three fruits because they superficially resemble each other) "superfruits" or "superfoods" is misleading at the very least; I previously mentioned that they might have benefits, but these can be negligible.
I tried certain "health foods" mostly for the tastebud rather than their proposed benefits. My adventures include tiger nuts, cacao nibs, aronia berries, golden berries (or phrysalis, which is available both fresh and dried), mulberries, etc.

Hornblower
2015-May-21, 03:27 AM
Probably the closest thing to a true superfood is citrus, the variety of fruit that helped the RN rule the World's oceans for over a century. Of course, there was a lot more to the RN's long-term supremacy.
That looks like a good point about the citrus. It packs a lot of vitamin C in a small package, which is a big help in preventing scurvy in the cramped confines of a ship at sea in those days. I can see it now. Hardtack for the carbs, dried meat and beans for the protein, and citrus fruits for the vitamin C.

Darrell
2015-May-21, 08:36 PM
Interestingly, there are a few fruits & vegetables that have more vitamin C gram for gram than citrus. Strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, kiwi and papaya to name a few.

swampyankee
2015-May-21, 08:50 PM
Interestingly, there are a few fruits & vegetables that have more vitamin C gram for gram than citrus. Strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, kiwi and papaya to name a few.

I can't imagine British sailors being called "papayas."

Hornblower
2015-May-21, 10:06 PM
Interestingly, there are a few fruits & vegetables that have more vitamin C gram for gram than citrus. Strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower, kiwi and papaya to name a few.
Perhaps citrus fruits were easier keepers in the unrefrigerated storage conditions aboard sailing ships when the scurvy prevention practice was started.

Inclusa
2015-May-22, 03:27 AM
Perhaps citrus fruits were easier keepers in the unrefrigerated storage conditions aboard sailing ships when the scurvy prevention practice was started.

The very structure of citrus fruits render them more durable than other fruits, which do not always bear a reliable "protective layer".
By the way, is it true that oranges originated from China or East Asia? They call them Citrus sinensis anyway.

grant hutchison
2015-May-22, 12:41 PM
Just a reminder: many foods have certain health (or even medical) benefits.And another reminder. If something has a "medical benefit", it will have the potential for unwanted adverse effects, too. Best not to eat anything that has "medical benefits" unless you need "medical treatment" and have discussed your choice with a "medical doctor".

Grant Hutchison

Darrell
2015-May-22, 12:55 PM
Perhaps citrus fruits were easier keepers in the unrefrigerated storage conditions aboard sailing ships when the scurvy prevention practice was started.

I think so. Even just the peels are very good sources of vitamin C, and calcium if I remember correctly. And dried they can last a long time.

grant hutchison
2015-May-22, 02:03 PM
I think so. Even just the peels are very good sources of vitamin C, and calcium if I remember correctly. And dried they can last a long time.The trouble is, Vitamin C oxidizes over time and becomes inactive. The hotter it is, the faster it oxidizes. And it oxidizes faster in whole citrus fruit than in juice. So lime or lemon juice is a better storage solution for scurvy prevention than storing whole fruit. But the trouble with that is that the Royal Navy's method of producing and storing lime and lemon juice initially involved heating in copper containers, which effectively destroyed the Vitamin C. Likewise for sauerkraut, which contains a substantial amount of Vitamin C unless it's heated.

What saved mariners in the 18th and 19th century from developing scurvy was frequent stops at ports, to purchase fresh fruit, vegetables and meat, thereby getting a dose of Vitamin C before the inevitable oxidation set in with storage. There was also a fashion for carrying bales of scurvy-grass aboard ship - it certainly cures scurvy when fresh, but I don't actually know how long it stayed effective in storage.

Grant Hutchison

Darrell
2015-May-22, 02:23 PM
Interesting stuff, thanks Grant.

profloater
2015-May-22, 03:59 PM
I don't think vitamins count as superfoods, they are essential to life. I would offer apart from garlic, eggs and milk. You can get a whole chicken from an egg and a whole baby from milk, so they must contain a complete diet! The claims of flavonoids and antioxidants are the ones to take with a pinch of salt.��

profloater
2015-May-24, 05:28 PM
interesting article New Scientist this week (I don't know when it goes online) about diet and vision. certain chemicals reinforce the natural UV blockers in the retina and they say good diet can improve vision in the elderly. Food sources include eggs.:)