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borman
2015-May-18, 12:07 AM
About resolving the faint young sun paradox using either Dark Energy or the AU increase anomaly

Recently posted in the fun papers
The Faint Young Sun Paradox in the Context of Modern Cosmology
http://arxiv.org/abs/1505.03572

The Krasinsky 2004 number, assuming it is a constant rather than an asymptote value, is 15 meters per century. Over 3-4 billion years this is around 500,000 km which is one part in 400 of the Earth’s distance from the Sun.

Those such as Lammerzahl et al, Acedo, and Arakida in particular find the comic expansion to be 9 orders too small to account for the AU anomaly.

The problem is even greater when geomorphic features of very early Mars shows a warm and wet Mars.

These are great differences when compared to the recent paper.

The mainstream idea is that greenhouse gasses could trap the warmth for liquid water. Some gas can come from volcanic eruptions. If, after the period of heavy bombardment, there was still a lesser period during the faint sun period, this could resupply the greenhouse gasses. Later, plant life might work as a governor to sequester some of the CO2.

References

Application of Time Transfer Function to McVittie Spacetime: Gravitational Time Delay and Secular Increase in Astronomical Unit
http://arxiv.org/abs/1103.2569

Astrometric Solar-System Anomalies
http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.2469

Is the physics within the Solar system really understood?
http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/0604052

Anomalous Post-Newtonian terms and the secular increase of the Astronomical Unit
http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.4056

Reality Check
2015-May-18, 01:27 AM
About resolving the faint young sun paradox using either Dark Energy or the AU increase anomaly

Recently posted in the fun papers
The Faint Young Sun Paradox in the Context of Modern Cosmology
http://arxiv.org/abs/1505.03572
Another problem I can see is that the effect of the expansion of the universe on the Solar System has been calculated before in Cooperstock, et. al. The influence of the cosmological expansion on local systems (1998) (http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/astro-ph/9803097) and they get the influence of the cosmological expansion on the Earth's orbit around the Sun amounts to a growth by only one part in a septillion over the age of the Solar System. A couple of points though - no dark energy and they use present values.

borman
2015-May-18, 01:49 AM
The effects of cosmic expansion are seen to be very small by several authors. So I am more aligned with the mainstream view that greenhouse gasses figure into water presence. How did Mars stay warm and Venus is unusually hot? It may have more to do with how each planet recharges and sustains its greenhouse gasses than its change of distance from the sun.

George
2015-May-18, 01:38 PM
The lack of consideration for radioisotopes or the possibility of greater convection of the distant past caught my attention.