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View Full Version : Is anyone still writing Cold War spy thrillers?



grant hutchison
2015-May-25, 07:52 PM
I've been enjoying the BBC's The Game, with all its gloomy 70s paranoia.
It made me wonder if there were any authors out there who are still writing regularly in the Cold War espionage genre.
Otherwise I might need to go and burrow in the attic for my Quiller collection.

Grant Hutchison

SkepticJ
2015-May-26, 07:33 PM
I don't know about novels, and I haven't watched it, but there's an FX Channel series called The Americans that is rated highly. It's set in the early '80s.

You can, of course, watch it over the internet from various sources.

swampyankee
2015-May-27, 02:04 AM
People are still writing westerns. Patrick O'Brian wrote about the Napoleonic War era. I'd not be surprised if people are still writing Cold War novels.

grant hutchison
2015-May-27, 01:00 PM
People are still writing westerns. Patrick O'Brian wrote about the Napoleonic War era. I'd not be surprised if people are still writing Cold War novels.I'd not be surprised either. I was hoping someone might have the name of an author.
The spy genre took a considerable hit at the end of the Cold War, with various authors repurposing their agents, usually unsuccessfully, to anti-terrorist activities. It seems topicality was considered important at the time. But (as you imply) we're now at the stage where Cold War novels would be described as historical fiction, so I was hoping a revival might be going on without my noticing.
I hanker after the days of fictional agents running around Warsaw and Moscow and East Berlin with the KGB hot on their trail, though I don't hanker after the real-world Cold War.

Grant Hutchison

swampyankee
2015-May-28, 09:08 PM
Be tough to do Cold War novels better than Len Deighton or John LeCarre.

Solfe
2015-May-31, 10:47 AM
I would like to plug Tom Clancy's Red Storm Rising. Largely, it is a war story but there bits that dive into 80's style spy novels.

I would say it has more to do with "intelligence operations" that either war or spying. The book thrives on deception and turn-a-bout.

slang
2015-May-31, 11:24 PM
I would like to plug Tom Clancy's Red Storm Rising. Largely, it is a war story but there bits that dive into 80's style spy novels.

I would say it has more to do with "intelligence operations" that either war or spying. The book thrives on deception and turn-a-bout.

While I love that book, it hardly qualifies as "still writing", as it's about 30 years old.. which makes it an 80's novel?

grant hutchison
2015-Jun-01, 01:17 PM
While I love that book, it hardly qualifies as "still writing", as it's about 30 years old.. And Clancy died a couple of years ago. I wasn't a great fan, but from my limited exposure he seemed to fall into the genre of topical technothriller rather than retro espionage.

Grant Hutchison

slang
2015-Jun-01, 07:37 PM
And Clancy died a couple of years ago. I wasn't a great fan, but from my limited exposure he seemed to fall into the genre of topical technothriller rather than retro espionage.

Yes, and technothriller he did well, certainly in the first decade. Spawned a few fun movies too. Mind, CIA operations were a large part of several books, but IIRC that was more special ops work rather than cloak and dagger.