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Paul Wally
2015-Jun-15, 06:30 PM
If we wanted to seed the oceans of Europa and establish a rich biosphere on (in) that moon, how would
we do that? One big problem is of course photosynthesis, so an alternative primary energy source is needed.
Any ideas?

Noclevername
2015-Jun-15, 08:24 PM
Europa's ocean is thought to be high in oxygen due to billions of years of ionization of surface ice, which eventually gets recycled back into the water. So there's probably plenty of free chemical energy. Also, the core is heated by tidal stress, so there's probably underwater vents similar to Earth's black smokers, which support a complex ecology of chemo-synthetic life.

John Mendenhall
2015-Jun-16, 11:39 AM
First you have to find out what if anything is there already.

Noclevername
2015-Jun-16, 11:52 AM
First you have to find out what if anything is there already.

I guess I had assumed that, because the OP said "establish" a biosphere; meaning (to me) that there was none before. But yes, it's worth spelling out. If there's any chance that there's native life, any contamination can mess that up. Who wants to be responsible for wiping out the first ET ecology we encounter!

Paul Wally
2015-Jun-21, 05:03 PM
Also, the core is heated by tidal stress, so there's probably underwater vents similar to Earth's black smokers, which support a complex ecology of chemo-synthetic life.

...or energy could be supplied from above the surface by power plants.

Paul Wally
2015-Jun-21, 05:07 PM
First you have to find out what if anything is there already.

The interaction between organisms from different planets might be interesting.

publiusr
2015-Jun-27, 07:52 PM
Tubeworms could probably get pretty big on Europa.

ravens_cry
2015-Jul-01, 01:16 AM
The interaction between organisms from different planets might be interesting.
Tell that to the dodo.

Paul Wally
2015-Jul-09, 03:05 PM
Tell that to the dodo.

I'd say it depends on the nature of the interaction.

FarmMarsNow
2015-Jul-12, 01:51 AM
It would be interesting to find some life there such as some prokaryotes.

Selfsim
2015-Jul-13, 07:22 AM
It would be interesting to find some life there such as some prokaryotes.Doesn't look like that's gonna happen anytime soon:
No life-detection gear: (http://www.space.com/29487-nasa-europa-mission-science.html)

The Europa flyby mission is dedicated to probing the moon's habitability, not actively seeking out signs of life.

"Building a life detecor is incredibly difficult," Niebur said. "We're not even sure how to go about building it yet".
...
Many astrobiologists would love to get a probe down on Europa's surface and, ideally, into the underground ocean. The data gathered by the flyby spacecraft could help pave the way for such an ambitious effort, NASA officials said.

These instruments "could find indications of life, but they are not life detectors (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/these-instruments-will-help-nasa-figure-out-if-life-can-thrive-europa-180955407/?no-ist):"
Niebur stressed. Planetary experts have been debating the issue, he said, and "what became clear is that we don't have a life detector, because we don't have a consensus on the thing that would tell everybody looking at it, this is alive."So, if detecting exo-life on Europa is a 'non-starter', then deciding what is needed in order to 'seed' it, is equally a non-starter .. for all the same reasons.

The slow accumulation of data, using the chosen instrument suite, is what is needed .. (no matter what 'many astrobiologists would love to' do, (quoted from above) ).