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Human
2005-Jan-22, 03:18 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4003063.stm

What are your thoughts on this? Do you think it's even possible?

mickal555
2005-Jan-22, 03:22 PM
This was discussed somplace else... but no one seems sceptical

tmosher
2005-Jan-22, 05:30 PM
The big question is - would anyone want to live that long?

Probably gets pretty boring after the first three or four hundred years.

Nicolas
2005-Jan-22, 05:51 PM
Now I push myself to go through my study as fast as possible. If I'd live to be 1000, why would I? I think it would lower our efficiency a lot, and it would become boring indeed. Plus many people wouldn't dare to go outside and do things anymore because of the risk of dying. Now we want to go out and do things because of the certainty of limited lifespan.
Life would become boring after a while I believe, and as for the suicide numbers...


we will inevitably be able to address ageing just as effectively as we address many diseases today.
Like the cold?

Anyway, I have little confidence in the complete stopping of ageing processes. To name one thing, brain cells aren't renewed, so we would have to use cells that are hundreds of years old. It wouldn't surprise me if that gave rise to its own nasty problems...

Bad jcsd
2005-Jan-22, 05:54 PM
Look at his beard and ask yourself this question - "Do I trust that man?"

tmosher
2005-Jan-22, 07:18 PM
Look at his beard and ask yourself this question - "Do I trust that man?"

Ah...the intimidating beard theory.

Bad jcsd
2005-Jan-22, 07:20 PM
Look at his beard and ask yourself this question - "Do I trust that man?"

Ah...the intimidating beard theory.

Never trust a man with a beard, they have something to hide.

Moose
2005-Jan-22, 07:31 PM
Never trust a man with a beard, they have something to hide.

[innocent look] Their chin? [/innocent look]

The cads. :o 8-[

Silent Knight
2005-Jan-22, 09:13 PM
Previous thread. (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=18085&highlight=live+years)

beskeptical
2005-Jan-23, 02:54 AM
The big question is - would anyone want to live that long?

Probably gets pretty boring after the first three or four hundred years.Gee, speak for yourself. I am excited to hear a prediction we might develop this technology in time for me to take advantage of it. I'd hate to die only to be a few years short of major life extending technologies.

I'd like to see the world a thousand years from now. That would be so great unless we can't overcome the need for war or do trigger an ice age. Well maybe the ice age won't be so bad if we have the technology to cope with it.

tmosher
2005-Jan-23, 04:34 AM
Imagine the "consequences" of living to a thousand.

- Can you imagine yourself working for 600 years? Although being retired for around 400 years could be interesting.
- Social Security would definitely need overhaul.

dgruss23
2005-Jan-23, 04:56 PM
Imagine the "consequences" of living to a thousand.

- Can you imagine yourself working for 600 years? Although being retired for around 400 years could be interesting.
- Social Security would definitely need overhaul.

Of course 1000 is not a cutoff according to this guy. Its simply the age by which statistically the odds are you would die from some sort of accident. If he were right about this - as long as you avoided accidents you could live forever.

Personally, about the only positive that could come out of this idea would be living long enough to know the answers to questions like "I wonder what they'll know in 100 years ... 500 years ...". So, for intellectual pursuits it would be pretty cool, but for everything else it could create problems. For example:

When life is short, people are more likely to embrace the time they have. If all of the sudden you could live until the age of 1000, 2000, ... you are losing a lot of years by taking risks.

What about love and family? Too many people drift apart as it is in our ~70 year lifespans. As the character Lorien said in Babylon5 "Only those whose lives are short can believe that love is forever." (or something to that effect).

Can you imagine the number of spouses a person might go through in 1000 years? Heck you wouldn't even remember the name of that person you had 3 kids with 600 years ago. Or since everybody's bodies are eternally young you find someone born in 2100 married to someone born in 2900 - and oops It turns out you're the great great .... grandfather of your latest wife. :o

kucharek
2005-Jan-23, 05:11 PM
If it becomes possible, it will be done. If it is cheap to do, we'll get a lot of social problems. If it stops ageing, at which age would we apply it? 30? If it would stop ageing, would it be okay to give it to already old and immobilized people? If it is applicable to the masses, we need very strict birth control. What would be the reproduction rate of a stable population with a mean age of 1000? How would we deal with kids when they become a pretty rare thing?
We are already a risk-avoiding society. How bad will this become if we become immortal in terms of ageing? If it becomes available, but is very expensive: Would it be ethically acceptable not to give it to everyone who wants it?

dgruss23
2005-Jan-23, 05:19 PM
If it is applicable to the masses, we need very strict birth control. What would be the reproduction rate of a stable population with a mean age of 1000? How would we deal with kids when they become a pretty rare thing?

I was thinking about that. My suspicion is that laws controlling birth rates might not be necessary. Everyone I know who has kids just entering college experiences both a sense of sadness and relief when they head off to college. Its a lot of work raising kids well. I'd bet if this was possible two things would happen - people disposed towards having kids would take breaks. Give it a 100 years before the next batch of kidlets. Or people would decide that there are a lot of things to do and that they'll always be a time in the future when they could do that because there is no "biological clock" running against them.

Birth rates might actually slow ... but I still can't see this 1000 year life being a good thing. That said, how many of us think we'd be able to turn it down if it was an option?

Moose
2005-Jan-23, 05:36 PM
What about love and family? Too many people drift apart as it is in our ~70 year lifespans. As the character Lorien said in Babylon5 "Only those whose lives are short can believe that love is forever." (or something to that effect).



Sheridan: (incredulous) You can't die?
Lorien: Oh, we can be injured, and die. Become ill, and die.
Sheridan: So where are the rest of your people?
Lorien: (rueful) They grew ill, and died. Were injured, and died. I am the last, as I was the first. Appropriate.


Live a thousand years? Yeah, I wouldn't mind that. Makes for a perfect opportunity to start learning how to explore more than our front porch.

dgruss23
2005-Jan-23, 05:49 PM
What about love and family? Too many people drift apart as it is in our ~70 year lifespans. As the character Lorien said in Babylon5 "Only those whose lives are short can believe that love is forever." (or something to that effect).



Sheridan: (incredulous) You can't die?
Lorien: Oh, we can be injured, and die. Become ill, and die.
Sheridan: So where are the rest of your people?
Lorien: (rueful) They grew ill, and died. Were injured, and died. I am the last, as I was the first. Appropriate.


Live a thousand years? Yeah, I wouldn't mind that. Makes for a perfect opportunity to start learning how to explore more than our front porch.

The quote I'm thinking of was Lorien speaking to Ivanova on B5 before they left to join the fleet at Corionas.

Moose
2005-Jan-23, 05:51 PM
What about love and family? Too many people drift apart as it is in our ~70 year lifespans. As the character Lorien said in Babylon5 "Only those whose lives are short can believe that love is forever." (or something to that effect).



Sheridan: (incredulous) You can't die?
Lorien: Oh, we can be injured, and die. Become ill, and die.
Sheridan: So where are the rest of your people?
Lorien: (rueful) They grew ill, and died. Were injured, and died. I am the last, as I was the first. Appropriate.


Live a thousand years? Yeah, I wouldn't mind that. Makes for a perfect opportunity to start learning how to explore more than our front porch.

The quote I'm thinking of was Lorien speaking to Ivanova on B5 before they left to join the fleet at Corionas.

I know. I just thought his other "ageless" quote was apt to the thread. I quoted yours as a bridge.

dgruss23
2005-Jan-23, 05:54 PM
What about love and family? Too many people drift apart as it is in our ~70 year lifespans. As the character Lorien said in Babylon5 "Only those whose lives are short can believe that love is forever." (or something to that effect).



Sheridan: (incredulous) You can't die?
Lorien: Oh, we can be injured, and die. Become ill, and die.
Sheridan: So where are the rest of your people?
Lorien: (rueful) They grew ill, and died. Were injured, and died. I am the last, as I was the first. Appropriate.


Live a thousand years? Yeah, I wouldn't mind that. Makes for a perfect opportunity to start learning how to explore more than our front porch.

The quote I'm thinking of was Lorien speaking to Ivanova on B5 before they left to join the fleet at Corionas.

I know. I just thought his other "ageless" quote was apt to the thread. I quoted yours as a bridge.

I liked that quote too. A lot of good ones from B5 - still my favorite Sci Fi. I may have to break out the DVD's with this weather being what it is. :)

Human
2005-Feb-05, 09:48 AM
New question: If this will be possible, will people do it?

Eroica
2005-Feb-05, 10:35 AM
Why not? Few people seem to be in a hurry to die as it is.

Weird Dave
2005-Feb-05, 11:06 AM
I'm up for immortality. :) Provided eternal youth is included.

Social security: not a problem if nobody gets old enough to retire. I expect people would save money for a while, then take a 20-year-or-so holiday before having another go at the same (or a different) career.

Love: If people can be sure of remaining fertile and beautiful for hundreds of years, there'd be no pressure to settle down before you find the perfect partner. So perhaps marriages would be more successful, on average.

Children: Ban them :D . Seriously, though, women will still have a fixed number of eggs, so they won't be able to have thousands of children. Perhaps people would freeze some eggs while they're young, and then have IVF when they want children. There could be laws to restrict couples to 2.4 children each (or whatever replacement rate is).

Risk aversion: Yes, could be a problem. Stagnation of culture and science could be problems too, because things tend to advance only when the old masters die off. On the other hand, the prospect of another few hundred Terry Pratchett or Stephen Baxter novels doesn't exactly fill me with fear 8) . And the prospect of starting a probe on its way to Alpha Centauri is a lot more attractive if you'll be alive when it arrives.

Environment: People will probably be a lot more careful about environmental matters if they live for centuries. It's all very well to talk about your grandchildren suffering from global warming in the future; quite another thing if that's going to be you who will never go skiing again.

Finally, I think the prospects of this happening to anyone alive today are extremely slim, but we need to start thinking about the ethical problems NOW, so that we're ready to make the choice when it becomes available.

Fram
2005-Feb-05, 12:02 PM
I'm all for it.
Someone said 'working for 600 year until retirement?' or such a thing. I don't think that woule be really a problem. You could work for twenty years or so, then go back to school for a couple of years to redirect, and start working again in a different branch. Just imagine the wealth of experiences and knowledge you can accumulate in a lifetime, even if you forget a lot!
There would of course be huge social changes, but as the average life span has already doubled (more or less), we seem to adopt quite well to such changes.

Argos
2005-Feb-05, 12:06 PM
Look at his beard and ask yourself this question - "Do I trust that man?"

Ah...the intimidating beard theory.

Never trust a man with a beard, they have something to hide.

Im bearded now, and I really feel more comfortable with it hiding my face. The same goes for glasses. Combined with a beard they make me feel really detached from this world. 8)