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View Full Version : Deep Implact, are we in danger?



EX
2005-Jan-22, 03:19 PM
Hi guys sorry for another uneducated question. I have been reading a bit about this deep impact mission and I dont really believe anything the government tells us so Im searching for an educated answer from a non judgemental source (you all) Is this thing going to wipe us out of nasa's mission (what ever it really may be) fails ?

Doodler
2005-Jan-22, 03:24 PM
Hi guys sorry for another uneducated question. I have been reading a bit about this deep impact mission and I dont really believe anything the government tells us so Im searching for an educated answer from a non judgemental source (you all) Is this thing going to wipe us out of nasa's mission (what ever it really may be) fails ?

Not even remotely possible. Its firing an 800 pound slug into a 6 mile wide snowball. I believe the comparison has been made to that of a mosquito hitting your windshield. Your full sized SUV windshield.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Jan-22, 03:24 PM
Must Resist the Urge, to say, "YES!" ...

In a Word: No.

In more Words, sheesh Man, Stop Reading GLP!

It's Worse for your Health, than Doing Crack!

mickal555
2005-Jan-22, 03:26 PM
and use the search function

btw
DOn't use crack

Doodler
2005-Jan-22, 03:30 PM
Just to give you a better idea, this is the mission page NASA has for DI.

http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/impactor.html

That one links directly to the impactor. Its a slug. No nukes, no TNT, no C4, no Semtex, nothing that will go boom and try to divert it. They only expect a large crater on the nucleus' surface because the material of the comet itself is not believed to be all that densely packed.

By way of comparison, if its snowing in your area, build a 30 foot diameter, tightly packed snow mound and fire a BB at it from a high compression rifle. You have now had more impact on that snow mound than DI is expected to have on Tempel 1.

EX
2005-Jan-22, 03:38 PM
Just to give you a better idea, this is the mission page NASA has for DI.

http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/impactor.html

That one links directly to the impactor. Its a slug. No nukes, no TNT, no C4, no Semtex, nothing that will go boom and try to divert it. They only expect a large crater on the nucleus' surface because the material of the comet itself is not believed to be all that densely packed.

By way of comparison, if its snowing in your area, build a 30 foot diameter, tightly packed snow mound and fire a BB at it from a high compression rifle. You have now had more impact on that snow mound than DI is expected to have on Tempel 1.


I see it like this mission is a recon to see what its actually made of and how that material may react to which ever device they would use to try move it off course to avoid impacting our planet.

Doodler
2005-Jan-22, 03:40 PM
Just to give you a better idea, this is the mission page NASA has for DI.

http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/impactor.html

That one links directly to the impactor. Its a slug. No nukes, no TNT, no C4, no Semtex, nothing that will go boom and try to divert it. They only expect a large crater on the nucleus' surface because the material of the comet itself is not believed to be all that densely packed.

By way of comparison, if its snowing in your area, build a 30 foot diameter, tightly packed snow mound and fire a BB at it from a high compression rifle. You have now had more impact on that snow mound than DI is expected to have on Tempel 1.


I see it like this mission is a recon to see what its actually made of and how that material may react to which ever device they would use to try move it off course to avoid impacting our planet.

As an aside, if anything. The real mission is to get under the skin of the comet and see what its really made of.

EX
2005-Jan-22, 03:44 PM
I see it like this mission is a recon to see what its actually made of and how that material may react to which ever device they would use to try move it off course to avoid impacting our planet.

Ut
2005-Jan-22, 04:03 PM
I see it like this mission is a recon to see what its actually made of and how that material may react to which ever device they would use to try move it off course to avoid impacting our planet.

So what, exactly, suggests that it's going to hit us, anyway?

Kaptain K
2005-Jan-22, 04:03 PM
I see it like this mission is a recon to see what its actually made of and how that material may react to which ever device they would use to try move it off course to avoid impacting our planet.
People have tried to put it politely, but it does not seem to be getting through. So:
Comet Tempel 1 will not hit the Earth - ever!

Padawan
2005-Jan-22, 04:08 PM
People have tried to put it politely, but it does not seem to be getting through. So:
Comet Tempel 1 will not hit the Earth - ever!


Lol, I think people get scared about every asteroid or comet that is crossing the orbit of earth. People should worry more about dying in a car accident or whatever.

01101001
2005-Jan-22, 04:56 PM
From that OK... (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=19140) topic:


Although that isnt what they really say but I was thinking that is what is really going on though, as this prob from what I read appears to have been sent up on a moments notice.
A moment's notice? You haven't been following it, have you?

It was submitted to NASA as a proposal in 1998. You know people had to start thinking about it years before that.

A 1998 press release (http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/press/98-203.html):


Deep Impact, a flyby mission designed to fire an 1,100-pound (500 kilogram) copper projectile into the comet P/Tempel 1, excavating a large crater more than 65 feet (20 meters) deep, in order to expose its pristine interior ice and rock. Deep Impact would be led by Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland, College Park, at a total cost of $203.8 million.

JustAGuy
2005-Jan-22, 06:16 PM
Lol, I think people get scared about every asteroid or comet that is crossing the orbit of earth. People should worry more about dying in a car accident or whatever.
The best part is that Tempel 1 isn't even Earth-crossing. It orbits entirely outside the orbit of Earth, and not by a small amount.

Added: Here's the orbital info on Tempel 1. It barely even crosses the orbit of Mars.
http://deepimpact.umd.edu/amateur/where_is.shtml

Jerod S. V2.0
2005-Jan-23, 10:14 AM
As an aside, if anything. The real mission is to get under the skin of the comet and see what its really made of.

What?! I thought James McCanney already answered that question. It's plasma, I say, *plasma*! :P :roll: