PDA

View Full Version : I Love Unbridled Creativity



Spacewriter
2005-Jan-23, 08:35 PM
Saw this thing over at Wilwheaton.net and followed the link to Amazon...

Badonkadonk for sale (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00067F1CE/qid=1106249151/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl236/104-4906296-9551132?v=glance&n=507846)

The reviews are a scream.

Then visit the company that made the thing here: www.naodesign.net

Candy
2005-Jan-23, 08:42 PM
It's certainly no chick mobile.

And why is that man wearing a skirt? :P

Ut
2005-Jan-23, 08:55 PM
I take it back. We could totally pick up chicks in that thing. Maybe even two, or three.

Enzp
2005-Jan-23, 08:57 PM
Cool, but how are they in the snow? We got plenty of that here right now. The Tecumse engine is good, it is the same one as in my roto-tiller, so I have a ready supply of parts, plus an excuse for not planting a garden.

Spacewriter
2005-Jan-23, 09:01 PM
It's certainly no chick mobile.

And why is that man wearing a skirt? :P

He's a Jawa. They wear skirts on ceremonial sand storm days.

Candy
2005-Jan-23, 09:05 PM
He's a Jawa. They wear skirts on ceremonial sand storm days.
Interesting. :-k

I like it. :D

zebo-the-fat
2005-Jan-23, 11:11 PM
Can I get it in pink?

Candy
2005-Jan-24, 12:10 AM
I'm watching Jeepers Creepers right now. Does the vehicle look familiar?


Horror. Gina Phillips, Justin Long, Jonathan Breck. (2001) A cloaked figure terrorizes two siblings after they discover mutilated bodies in a country drainpipe.

Captain Kidd
2005-Jan-24, 01:43 AM
And why is that man wearing a skirt? :PThat's no skirt, it's a Utilikilt (http://www.utilikilts.com/)!

sarongsong
2005-Jan-24, 03:14 AM
Then there's the (bridled) Levitating Hover Scooter (http://www.hammacher.com/publish/10321.asp) for 15 grand...

Gullible Jones
2005-Jan-24, 04:22 AM
That thing must be a complete PITA to steer. And probably loud as all get out too...

genebujold
2005-Oct-23, 07:21 PM
It's certainly no chick mobile.

And why is that man wearing a skirt? :P

I dunno. Perhaps because men have been wearing skirts and dresses (aka kilts and robes) for the last 50,000 years of recorded history?

Duh?

And let's not forget that a full third of men around the planet wear skirts today.

Ladies, they weren't your invention. Get over it.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-24, 02:52 AM
I dunno. Perhaps because men have been wearing skirts and dresses (aka kilts and robes) for the last 50,000 years of recorded history?

Duh?

And let's not forget that a full third of men around the planet wear skirts today.

Ladies, they weren't your invention. Get over it.

I never would have asked the question. (And how do you know skirts weren't our invention? Were you around 50,000 years ago to find out who the inventor of the skirt was?) In fact, I had to forcibly restrain myself from explaining to a three-year-old that while a wizard's robe may look like a dress, it's what men actually wore for several hundred years.

genebujold
2005-Oct-24, 05:25 PM
I never would have asked the question.

Of course not. That's not your style.

But Candy did ask the question, in post #2 of this thread. I merely responded to her question. Just out of curiosity, why was your response to my post so caustic? What skeletons do you have in your closet, hmmm?


And how do you know skirts weren't our invention? Were you around 50,000 years ago to find out who the inventor of the skirt was?

Same way we believe in evolution. Evidence. In the case of clothing, it's in three forms - written descriptions, carved/painted depictions, and physical evidence, some from sarcophagii, and others from well-preserved ruins.

For example, some of the most notable examples are from the following sources:

1. Paintings and pictoral descriptions (date back more than 7,000 years)

2. Statues (date back more than 5,000 years)

3. Excavations of volcanic preservation (Pompeii) (date back more than 10,000 years)

4. Sacrophogus (date back more than 3500 years, but is highly selective, and not representational of the populace at large)


In fact, I had to forcibly restrain myself from explaining to a three-year-old that while a wizard's robe may look like a dress, it's what men actually wore for several hundred years.

Several tens of thousands of years, actually. And why did you "forcibly restrain" yourself? I would think that any parent worth their weight in salt would want their children to know the truth! Heaven forbid I would ever lie to my children about history! Egads!

Here's but the small slice of recorded history: http://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/COSTUME1_INDEX.HTML

Gillianren
2005-Oct-24, 07:30 PM
Of course not. That's not your style.

No. Because I knew the answer.


But Candy did ask the question, in post #2 of this thread. I merely responded to her question. Just out of curiosity, why was your response to my post so caustic? What skeletons do you have in your closet, hmmm?

You said "ladies." By implication, we were all selfishly claiming the skirt for our own devices. However, what you meant was "Candy."


Same way we believe in evolution. Evidence. In the case of clothing, it's in three forms - written descriptions, carved/painted depictions, and physical evidence, some from sarcophagii, and others from well-preserved ruins.

For example, some of the most notable examples are from the following sources:

1. Paintings and pictoral descriptions (date back more than 7,000 years)

2. Statues (date back more than 5,000 years)

3. Excavations of volcanic preservation (Pompeii) (date back more than 10,000 years)

4. Sacrophogus (date back more than 3500 years, but is highly selective, and not representational of the populace at large)

You're missing my point. None of that records the inventor of the skirt. The evidence makes no stand on it. However, it is possible for that forgotten inventor to be a woman, just as it is possible for the inventor to be a man. However, you have no more information about that than anyone else (50,000 years is also a longer time than any of your evidence)--and, by the way, Pompeii itself is only about 2000 years old. It would be more accurate to say that some date back more than 10,000 years, though I know of no examples. (Note I'm not saying they don't exist; I just don't know about them.)


Several tens of thousands of years, actually. And why did you "forcibly restrain" yourself? I would think that any parent worth their weight in salt would want their children to know the truth! Heaven forbid I would ever lie to my children about history! Egads!

The wizard's robe is based on the academic robe of Europe, which in turn is based on the robe that was used in Europe for several centuries. It is not based on the robes worn in the Middle East for milennia, which evolved separately. And I forcibly restrained myself for two reasons: first and most important, it wasn't my kid. If it had been, I might not've restrained myself. However, at age three, the kid didn't care. Frankly, it might've been just an excuse so he could've dressed up as Spider-Man instead.


Here's but the small slice of recorded history: http://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/COSTUME1_INDEX.HTML

Yes. I have several books on the subject.