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michael v d
2015-Jul-19, 06:12 PM
Question
What is the most efficient proposed Nuclear Propulsion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_propulsion) rocket that could run at 10 g-force in space.

Can anyone find this information
Proposed hydrogen isotope rocket of xxxx kgs (x tons) can reach speed of x mph/kph in x seconds and run for x hours
(e.g. 1000kg rocket weight of can reach speed of x mph/kph in x seconds (or has g-force potential of x) for x24 hours

The answer to above will help correct these equation question:
A nuclear hydrogen isotype propulsion ship of x22000kg (20000 kg of fuel + 2 tons of ship) could produce 10 g-force for 50 days (taking into consideration that the ship would get lighter).

Not a question
50 days @ 10 g-force = light speed (with theory that weight is not effected by speed).
India, Australia and South America produce x100000kgs of x per year.

Jens
2015-Jul-22, 04:03 AM
Sorry to answer a question with a question, but what's a "hydrogen isotope rocket"? You're thinking of a fusion rocket that would use fusion power to expel a propellant?

WayneFrancis
2015-Jul-22, 05:59 AM
...Not a question
50 days @ 10 g-force = light speed (with theory that weight is not effected by speed).
...

Just a note ∞ days @ 10g < c
basically special relativity

Noclevername
2015-Jul-22, 09:57 PM
A well-designed Nuclear-Pulse Orion might do 10 Gs average.


50 days @ 10 g-force = light speed (with theory that weight is not effected by speed).


Since nothing with mass can actually reach light speed, what percentage of C are we talking here?

michael v d
2015-Jul-26, 07:12 PM
Sorry to answer a question with a question, but what's a "hydrogen isotope rocket"? You're thinking of a fusion rocket that would use fusion power to expel a propellant?

a hydrogen isotope rocket is a "nuclear hydrogen rocket" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_thermal_rocket

michael v d
2015-Jul-26, 07:35 PM
A well-designed Nuclear-Pulse Orion might do 10 Gs average.

Since nothing with mass can actually reach light speed, what percentage of C are we talking here?

Thanks for your comment, I did think 10 Gs was possible. Someone else already did the research on specs from these rockets and said it was possible with an array. Just interested how big the array was. The question was suggested with theory that mass is not effected by speed in space. and it has already be proven that things with mass can travel at the speed of light and faster https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light_neutrino_anomaly. 10 Gs is not needed. Either way it's good for future speed tests.

Noclevername
2015-Jul-26, 08:23 PM
and it has already be proven that things with mass can travel at the speed of light and faster https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light_neutrino_anomaly. 10 Gs is not needed. Either way it's good for future speed tests.

Did you read the Wiki article you linked? It said that the neutrino "results" were a mistake due to poorly tuned equipment. The old rules still apply; no mass can go at, let alone over, C.

cjameshuff
2015-Jul-26, 08:37 PM
Mass is not affected by speed. Relativistic mass was used as a way to get relativistic effects with more familiar equations from Newtonian mechanics, but the concept largely just confuses things.

Rockets that produce 10 gravities of acceleration are entirely possible. Rockets that can do so long enough to accelerate to a high fraction of c are not. And if you'll read the article you linked, you'll find that the neutrino anomaly was caused by a faulty connection and oscillator in the equipment. It has not been proven "that things with mass can travel at the speed of light and faster".

publiusr
2015-Aug-01, 08:07 PM
If it didn't melt, NSWRs might fit the bill. More steady than Orion put-puts

Noclevername
2015-Aug-01, 10:13 PM
If it didn't melt, NSWRs might fit the bill. More steady than Orion put-puts

And if I had wheels I'd be a wagon.

Van Rijn
2015-Aug-02, 01:23 AM
A NSWR might also blow up if too much fuel gets bunched up in the tanks or plumbing. And, the mass ratio would get rather bad if you wanted to go above 3% or so of the speed of light.

eburacum45
2015-Aug-05, 01:36 PM
Even an antimatter beam core engine with a mass ratio more than 96% couldn't accelerate at 10gee for 50 days (according to the nomograms on the Project Rho website) , so I don't think that any fusion drive could manage this.