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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2015-Jul-26, 04:57 PM
Was witness to an almost tragedy this morning while I was on my way to the flea market. This fellow blows through the intersection and nearly hits this young woman side on as she was passing through. He missed her by about 6 inches. He kept going merrily on his way; she pulled into the parking lot of a nearby supermarket. I walked up to her vehicle and needless to say she was quite shaken. I almost lost it myself. I have a few choice words for him for almost killing someone because he was in a hurray. Fools behind wheels.

Hlafordlaes
2015-Jul-26, 05:18 PM
A not-so-trivial thing that also bugs me seriously.

swampyankee
2015-Jul-26, 05:56 PM
Yes. It's a chronic, and worsening problem, in the area in which I live. Taxi drivers are, especially, notorious for running red lights, to the point where I tell my students (I'm teaching at an academic summer camp at Yale) not to try to cross, in a crosswalk, with the "walk" light on, if there's a cab approaching. (as a second, related data point, my daughter took a cab from our house to the train station. She was terrified, and this is a young woman who lives in NYC and takes cabs there often)

redshifter
2015-Jul-26, 06:15 PM
It's a huge problem around here as well, I will quite often see 2 -3 more cars run through a light AFTER it's changed to red. Folks that do that are why we have red light cameras at some intersections around here.

Gillianren
2015-Jul-26, 09:36 PM
Which is funny, because I'm only about an hour south of you and don't really have that problem. It happens some, and we have a lot of people who cut that yellow light awfully fine, but our biggest traffic problem is kamikaze pedestrians.

Trebuchet
2015-Jul-26, 11:11 PM
I'm frequently amazed when I think I've pushed a yellow light a little too far and two or three cars come through behind me. As for the difference between Seattle and Olympia, perhaps it's just the size of the city.

The Backroad Astronomer
2015-Jul-27, 12:56 AM
Hopefully that didn't happen somewhere like Quinpool and Robie. (my mothers favourite corner in Halifax.)

I come from a town that has only4 traffic lights all on same street.

danscope
2015-Jul-27, 07:37 PM
Today ( and I blame cell phones and texting) you "MUST" look both ways before starting across an intersection. You are at serious peril, no question.
Just look at the number of cars and other vehicles driving into houses and businesses for no explanation ......except that you can bet they are completely distracted with their own little world of texting and cell talk . These fools are nuts,nuts,nuts!!!!!!!!!!!! Save yourself.

starcanuck64
2015-Jul-27, 08:47 PM
Was witness to an almost tragedy this morning while I was on my way to the flea market. This fellow blows through the intersection and nearly hits this young woman side on as she was passing through. He missed her by about 6 inches. He kept going merrily on his way; she pulled into the parking lot of a nearby supermarket. I walked up to her vehicle and needless to say she was quite shaken. I almost lost it myself. I have a few choice words for him for almost killing someone because he was in a hurray. Fools behind wheels.

Maybe it was our Premier.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/christy-clark-admits-she-shouldn-t-have-run-red-light-1.1338794

starcanuck64
2015-Jul-27, 08:58 PM
Yes. It's a chronic, and worsening problem, in the area in which I live. Taxi drivers are, especially, notorious for running red lights, to the point where I tell my students (I'm teaching at an academic summer camp at Yale) not to try to cross, in a crosswalk, with the "walk" light on, if there's a cab approaching. (as a second, related data point, my daughter took a cab from our house to the train station. She was terrified, and this is a young woman who lives in NYC and takes cabs there often)

In the mid 90s in Vancouver I was walking through a crosswalk with the light and ended up on the hood of a cab that had whipped around the corner without stopping. The driver didn't even noticed at first and accelerated quite a bit before realizing he had a +200 lb. hood ornament. He then slammed on the breaks which shot me off the cab onto the street where luckily I ended up on my feet and began the fastest run of my life. This happened right in front of a busy transit station with dozens of people watching.

When crossing the street now I always wait until all cars are stopped and try to make eye contact to make sure drivers actually do see me.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2015-Jul-27, 09:56 PM
Hopefully that didn't happen somewhere like Quinpool and Robie. (my mothers favourite corner in Halifax.)

I come from a town that has only4 traffic lights all on same street.

Windsor and North...she very easily could have died. Funny, I found a penny shortly afterward...I think it rightfully was hers. She was just a child...maybe 22.

wd40
2015-Jul-27, 10:54 PM
Was there a few years ago a case of youths deliberately sabotaging the lights at an intersection to all show green that resulted in a fatal collision, and they were charged with 1st degree murder and only just escaped execution?

Gillianren
2015-Jul-27, 11:30 PM
I don't know--was there? You could maybe do the research yourself.

pzkpfw
2015-Jul-28, 01:00 AM
Was there a few years ago a case of youths deliberately sabotaging the lights at an intersection to all show green that resulted in a fatal collision, and they were charged with 1st degree murder and only just escaped execution?

That sounds like a myth - they'd have to have some in-depth knowledge of how the control systems worked, or enough time to jury rig manual controls (i.e. wire-up the greens directly).

I'd be happy to be proven wrong (but not happy at the results).

DonM435
2015-Jul-28, 02:43 PM
Some guy on a programming board said he was designing a traffic light system. I advised him to build in a fail-safe routine to never allow greens perpendicular to one another at any intersection: any anomaly, make 'em all red. But they probably thought of that long ago.

SeanF
2015-Jul-28, 04:13 PM
Was there a few years ago a case of youths deliberately sabotaging the lights at an intersection to all show green that resulted in a fatal collision, and they were charged with 1st degree murder and only just escaped execution?
You may be thinking of this case (http://www.cnn.com/US/9706/20/stop.sign/), but it involved the removal of stop signs rather than tampering with lights.

Jim
2015-Jul-28, 04:57 PM
Some years back (at least, in Texas), if any part of your car was still in the intersection when the light turned red, you were running a red light. And police issued tickets for that.

Someone(s) apparently thought that was unfair and the law was changed to you are NOT running a red light if any part of your car was in the intersection BEFORE the light turned red.

Which, of course, encouraged people to run red lights. "I bet I can get into that intersection before the light changes. Just gotta speed up a tad." This led to collisions, so in an effort to reduce those, the lights were set on a delay. One light turns red - one, two, three - and the other light turns green.

Folks figured out that they now had more time to run the light. They also figured out that other folks (oncoming traffic) also knew this, so they paused before starting when their light turned green - one, two, three, go.

Now you have about six seconds from the time the light turns red to run it "safely."

There's the story of a man from Chicago in New Orleans on business. His host, Robert (do not pronounce the "t") was driving him around town. As they approached an intersection, the light turned red. Robert kept going.

"You ran that red light."

"Aw, doan worra, cher. M'cuzzin Bienvenu does that alla time."

They approached another intersection. The light turned red. Robert kept going.

"I tol you not to worra. M'cuzzin Bienvenu does that alla time."

As they came up to the next intersection, the light turned green. Robert slammed on the brakes. The Chicagoan looked at him quizzically.

"M'cuzzin Bienvenu could be comin' t'other way."

NEOWatcher
2015-Jul-28, 07:35 PM
In Ohio, you can wait in the intersection (http://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/when-at-an-intersection-making-a-left-turn--can-tw-2009961.html) (when green) as long as you are not obstructing any other flow. But; there seems to be some confusion about that too since there is also a law to not enter an intersection if you can not clear the intersection.

The problem here is that you need to know the intersection. Upon entering my neighborhood, there is a light that turns red without the oncoming traffic getting a red. Then you are stuck blocking the intersection.

pzkpfw
2015-Jul-28, 07:46 PM
Some guy on a programming board said he was designing a traffic light system. I advised him to build in a fail-safe routine to never allow greens perpendicular to one another at any intersection: any anomaly, make 'em all red. But they probably thought of that long ago.

Sounds sensible.

Here, if there's a power cut or system fault, batteries put the lights at an intersection into "panic mode" (my term). All the lights flash amber (orange) and traffic is supposed to revert to uncontrolled intersection rules (e.g. straight traffic has rights over turning traffic). Of course, lights are usually on busy intersections, so the real result is gridlock. It's very very seldom we see the old fashioned approach of a cop standing in the intersection taking over control.

NEOWatcher
2015-Jul-28, 08:42 PM
Ours go to flashing red, essentially resulting in a 4-way stop sign.

NEOWatcher
2015-Aug-05, 06:25 PM
Some guy on a programming board said he was designing a traffic light system. I advised him to build in a fail-safe routine to never allow greens perpendicular to one another at any intersection: any anomaly, make 'em all red. But they probably thought of that long ago.
They thought of that right from the start with the First electric traffic signal (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-electric-traffic-signal-installed).

Wired to a manually operated switch inside a control booth, the system was configured so that conflicting signals were impossible.
Happy birthday to signal.

bknight
2015-Aug-05, 07:47 PM
Some years back (at least, in Texas), if any part of your car was still in the intersection when the light turned red, you were running a red light. And police issued tickets for that.

Someone(s) apparently thought that was unfair and the law was changed to you are NOT running a red light if any part of your car was in the intersection BEFORE the light turned red.

Which, of course, encouraged people to run red lights. "I bet I can get into that intersection before the light changes. Just gotta speed up a tad." This led to collisions, so in an effort to reduce those, the lights were set on a delay. One light turns red - one, two, three - and the other light turns green.

Folks figured out that they now had more time to run the light. They also figured out that other folks (oncoming traffic) also knew this, so they paused before starting when their light turned green - one, two, three, go.

Now you have about six seconds from the time the light turns red to run it "safely."

There's the story of a man from Chicago in New Orleans on business. His host, Robert (do not pronounce the "t") was driving him around town. As they approached an intersection, the light turned red. Robert kept going.

"You ran that red light."

"Aw, doan worra, cher. M'cuzzin Bienvenu does that alla time."

They approached another intersection. The light turned red. Robert kept going.

"I tol you not to worra. M'cuzzin Bienvenu does that alla time."

As they came up to the next intersection, the light turned green. Robert slammed on the brakes. The Chicagoan looked at him quizzically.

"M'cuzzin Bienvenu could be comin' t'other way."

This was no doubt a lawyer that got ticketed and fought it in court. We had a camera system at a fairly large intersection that caught many running the red light, my wife was one of them. Anyway I worked for long periods away from home and the next time I went through the intersection with NO CAMERA. I asked my wife and she said someone had fought a case and since his winning the case "proved" that the camera violated his civil rights and therefore they were taken down, not just deactivated.

swampyankee
2015-Aug-06, 02:22 AM
I'm frequently amazed when I think I've pushed a yellow light a little too far and two or three cars come through behind me. As for the difference between Seattle and Olympia, perhaps it's just the size of the city.

I've been stopped at red lights and had people pull around me to go through it. Alas, there was no alert local police officer.

DonM435
2015-Aug-06, 02:57 AM
I've been stopped at red lights and had people pull around me to go through it. Alas, there was no alert local police officer.

Once I was ready to zoom through an intersection on a waning yellow light, but decided not to do so. It then turned red, and I saw a patrol car stopped at the same light in the other direction. Whew!

Whereupon some car in the lane beside me roared on through. The cop made a u-turn and went after him.

Gillianren
2015-Aug-06, 08:18 AM
I've been stopped at red lights and had people pull around me to go through it. Alas, there was no alert local police officer.

I've probably told this story before, but my neighbourhood is about an equal mix of residential and offices, including a lot of city/county/state stuff. One day, I was crossing the street at the crosswalk nearest my apartment, and a county vehicle pulled up to the crosswalk and stopped to let me pass. As I was crossing, a car pulled around the county vehicle, into the turn lane, to get around and keep going, nearly running me over. The guy in the county vehicle and I exchanged astonished looks, and I think we both wished in that moment that he'd been one of the many cop cars around here instead. The county courthouse is down the block, and there's a sheriffs' substation in my bank a bit beyond that.

JohnD
2015-Aug-06, 09:47 AM
Did you get his number?
Did you call the Police?
No point in telling us! Be a responsible citizen, willing to go to court if needed as a witness!

John

Jim
2015-Aug-06, 11:23 AM
Whereupon some car in the lane beside me roared on through. The cop made a u-turn and went after him.

Proof there is justice in the world.

Not a red light incident, but I had my tires blown off by a guy passing me on the highway once. A couple of miles later I passed him, pulled over by a cop who was writing him a ticket.

I admit I gave the cop a fist bump gesture as I drove by.

DonM435
2015-Aug-06, 01:48 PM
Well, I have had my car struck from the rear on two occasions because I stopped at a yellow light that was about to change, because the guy behind me expected me to go through. You take a chance when you do that.

I think I wouldn't mind observing the speed limits strictly, so long as everybody did. However, hardly anybody does!

Jim
2015-Aug-06, 03:30 PM
I think I wouldn't mind observing the speed limits strictly, so long as everybody did. However, hardly anybody does!

Nonsense. I'm sure they observe the speed limit. "Oh, look, 'Speed Limit 65'."

It's whether they follow it or not that's in question.

NEOWatcher
2015-Aug-06, 04:30 PM
Nonsense. I'm sure they observe the speed limit. "Oh, look, 'Speed Limit 65'."
I've seen plenty that haven't. You start to pass and they speed up, so you slow down to let them go and they slow down.

Gillianren
2015-Aug-06, 04:45 PM
Did you get his number?
Did you call the Police?
No point in telling us! Be a responsible citizen, willing to go to court if needed as a witness!

Frankly, at the time, I was too astonished. However, there was a time that my best friend and I were on our way up to faire, and a guy was weaving in and out of lanes, crowding people, and otherwise being one of the worst drivers I've ever seen. (She remembers him slipping between two cars to pass them both, but I don't.) For us, the point at which we were getting out the phone to call the police was when he was straddling two lanes, trying to decide which would go faster. Being pulled over by the cop who happened to be there slowed him right down, though.

Jim
2015-Aug-07, 12:02 AM
I've seen plenty that haven't. You start to pass and they speed up, so you slow down to let them go and they slow down.

Which doesn't mean they didn't observe (see) the speed limit sign.

That was a joke ... a (cynical and somewhat sarcastic) play on the meanings of words.

And, yes, I've had that happen to me ... on the way home today, in fact ... twice.

Nicolas
2015-Aug-07, 11:01 AM
Once I ran up to an intersection. Light turned orange so I braked, and stopped. Then I got rear ended. Guy asked me why I stopped.

JohnD
2015-Aug-09, 03:36 PM
UK Highway Code, No.175
You MUST stop behind the white ‘Stop’ line across your side of the road unless the light is green. If the amber light appears you may go on only if you have already crossed the stop line or are so close to it that to stop might cause a collision .
No idea if your local laws reflect this.

The stopping distance at 30mph is 75 feet, or 6 car lengths. How often does urban traffic keep that sort of distance?
Mirror/Signal/Manoever, plus awareness on your part as well as his.

John

swampyankee
2015-Aug-10, 01:45 AM
UK Highway Code, No.175
You MUST stop behind the white ‘Stop’ line across your side of the road unless the light is green. If the amber light appears you may go on only if you have already crossed the stop line or are so close to it that to stop might cause a collision .
No idea if your local laws reflect this.

The stopping distance at 30mph is 75 feet, or 6 car lengths. How often does urban traffic keep that sort of distance?
Mirror/Signal/Manoever, plus awareness on your part as well as his.

John

Where I live, hitting the car in front is, prima facie, evidence of following too closely, including if the car in front stops for no visible reason.

Nicolas
2015-Aug-10, 09:21 AM
The "so close that you can cause a collission" is interpreted overhere as "you'd have to break so hard that you might lose control over your own vehicle". It does not reflect drivers close behind you. As swampyankee said, overhere the law concludes that you were not keeping enough distance if you can't stop when the car ahead of you does so. Moreover, you have to approach an intersection with caution. If I was able to not only brake but come to a complete stop before he hit me, he was driving too close and/or not paying attention. I have no idea what kind of signalling I have to do when I stop for a traffic light. I have brake lights...

Nicolas
2015-Aug-10, 09:36 AM
I just checked it (what I wrote was for Belgium), in the Netherlands I find legal advice that states that you are at fault if you "unnecessarily stop for an orange traffic light". How on earth can you legally define "unnecessarily stop" versus "necessarily stop" for an orange light? If you can stop, you have to, legally. There is no such thing as an unnecessary stop for an orange light.

Jens
2015-Aug-10, 10:58 AM
UK Highway Code, No.175
You MUST stop behind the white ‘Stop’ line across your side of the road unless the light is green. If the amber light appears you may go on only if you have already crossed the stop line or are so close to it that to stop might cause a collision .


That last part is the difficult one. It's a real judgment call to have to decide if there's a danger the person behind you might rear end you. It would seem safer to say that all cars must apt their brakes as soon as the light turns yellow, but then can accelerate and pass through the intersection once they've entered the white line. But it would waste gasoline.

JohnD
2015-Aug-10, 01:36 PM
Quote Nicolas : "you are at fault if you "unnecessarily stop for an orange traffic light""
Gosh, the orange light must be lit for a very long time in the Netherlands!
But then - it is the national colour!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkhptCpKADo

John

DonM435
2015-Aug-10, 02:14 PM
In both of the cases I mentioned, the driver behind me got ticketed for following too closely. In neither case did I jam on the brakes at the last moment: rather, I had timed the yellow light and knew it was about to change, and so stopped gently. Thus I'd say the charge was justified.

However, it's probably true that most drivers expect everyone to cheat on the yellow light, so it's a tough decision as to how much is too much.

Jim
2015-Aug-10, 04:49 PM
A timely article:
http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Houston-leads-the-nation-in-red-light-wreck-6426943.php

Yay, Houston is Number One!

Wait ... that's not a good thing.

Taeolas
2015-Aug-10, 05:05 PM
That last part is the difficult one. It's a real judgment call to have to decide if there's a danger the person behind you might rear end you. It would seem safer to say that all cars must apt their brakes as soon as the light turns yellow, but then can accelerate and pass through the intersection once they've entered the white line. But it would waste gasoline.

The rule of thumb I use is "If I'm within the solid lines, I'm clear for yellow". Most of the signalled intersections around here have the road markings turn into solid lines before the intersection. If I'm still in the dashed line part, I figure I have enough time to stop.

Granted that only usually works for roads where you have 2 lanes in the same direction and it's probably more to indicate "Don't change lanes from this point onward".

JohnD
2015-Aug-11, 08:09 AM
Good morning, Officer.
Care to tell me, Sir, why you ran that red light just now?
Oh, yes, Officer! The car behind me was so close that even though the yellow had been on for a while, I didn't think he could stop if I did. So I was obeying the Highway Code!
In yer dreams, Perp, you're nicked.

John

Jens
2015-Aug-11, 09:05 AM
Good morning, Officer.
Care to tell me, Sir, why you ran that red light just now?
Oh, yes, Officer! The car behind me was so close that even though the yellow had been on for a while, I didn't think he could stop if I did. So I was obeying the Highway Code!
In yer dreams, Perp, you're nicked.


-Well, officer, I had to go through! The guy behind me was dangerously close.

-But he was a half-kilometer behind you!

-Well, you never know, he might have been an F1 driver or something.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah. Tell the judge.

bknight
2015-Aug-11, 11:12 AM
A timely article:
http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Houston-leads-the-nation-in-red-light-wreck-6426943.php

Yay, Houston is Number One!

Wait ... that's not a good thing.
Unfortunately I live with this on a day to day basis. Really not a good driver behavior.

Taeolas
2015-Aug-11, 11:39 AM
Nah, this is better:


-Well, officer, I had to go through! The guy behind me was dangerously close.

-But, *I* was the guy behind you.

-You really shouldn't tailgate people like that.

*writes extra tickets.*

DonM435
2015-Aug-11, 03:07 PM
...

-Well, you never know, he might have been an F1 driver or something.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah. Tell the judge.


There have been cases of professional race car drivers getting busted for speeding.

How'd you like that lawyer's job? "Is my client the kind of man who'd drive too fast? I ask you, is he? I ... Aww, nuts! We pleas guilty."

Jim
2015-Aug-11, 04:45 PM
I was in traffic court once (as a state's witness) when a woman protested her ticket for running a red light. She told the judge that several cars ran the light and she was the only one who got pulled over. The judge asked the police office if that was true and he said it was.

"Why did you stop only her?"

"She was the only one I could catch."

"Ma'am, pay the bailiff."

Trebuchet
2015-Aug-12, 04:50 PM
We saw a state trooper trying to catch a speeding motorcyclist yesterday. He had no chance at all.

Jim
2015-Aug-12, 10:18 PM
There are stories about motorists who try to outrun police, and are successful.

Until they get home and find the cops waiting for them.

License plates, people. License plates.

swampyankee
2015-Aug-12, 10:46 PM
There are stories about motorists who try to outrun police, and are successful.

Until they get home and find the cops waiting for them.

License plates, people. License plates.

....and radio. Very few cars can even come vaguely close to light speed.

pzkpfw
2015-Aug-13, 05:34 AM
Here we used to have some weird loophole to do with traffic cops not being able to enter private property to ticket people. So there were people who raced home and actually "got away with it"; cops followed them all the way, but could do nothing.

So the laws got changed.

(We used to have separate Traffic Cops and Police. When they got combined, another loophole became apparent resulting from the different colours of their roof mounted lights and what was written in the laws about what you had to do on seeing certain colours. (e.g. you had to pull over if signalled by this colour, not that colour). To close that loophole, the cop cars now have both blue and red lights.)

Nicolas
2015-Aug-13, 06:40 AM
How'd you like that lawyer's job? "Is my client the kind of man who'd drive too fast? I ask you, is he? I ... Aww, nuts! We pleas guilty." A race car driver never drives too fast. Think about it.

JohnD
2015-Aug-13, 05:34 PM
pzkpfw,
Here in the UK we have some splendid TV programmes documenting what real police officers do: Stop! Police! Action, Video!; Road Wars; Police Interceptors etc. Fly in the patrol car, as it were.
I'm sure you have the same.
But those guys wouldn't let a perp get away with running home, so he could not be arrested. Some of them have photographic memories - in one prog. they were driving along when the officer driving stops, turns, chases and stops a car, because he recognised the driver, who he knew to be banned! What stopped the US Finest lying in wait at the end of the road, until the perp came out again?

John

pzkpfw
2015-Aug-14, 01:20 AM
pzkpfw,
Here in the UK we have some splendid TV programmes documenting what real police officers do: Stop! Police! Action, Video!; Road Wars; Police Interceptors etc. Fly in the patrol car, as it were.
I'm sure you have the same.
But those guys wouldn't let a perp get away with running home, so he could not be arrested. Some of them have photographic memories - in one prog. they were driving along when the officer driving stops, turns, chases and stops a car, because he recognised the driver, who he knew to be banned! What stopped the US Finest lying in wait at the end of the road, until the perp came out again?

John

Here the standard weapon assigned to a cop is a wet bus ticket. People might stop sooner if they knew the cop was armed a bit differently.

Another issue here is that if there's a crash during a chase, the officers involved come under very close scrutiny. Chases get called off if speeds are reached that are "too high". The general feeling is that it's better to let one crim get away (and try to get them later), than to risk an innocent bystander getting crashed into or run over. Fair enough, but has encouraged some runners.

arakish
2015-Aug-17, 04:49 AM
With so many drivers (about 3 in 4, I'd say) trying to drive while also using their cell phones (and I have seen LEOs doing this), you now know why I have decided to "jaywalk" and NEVER cross at intersections with either traffic lights or Stop signs. I have found it much safer to "jaywalk" across a street instead of using the traffic/pedestrian signals at an intersection.

I me self have had to have me right hip replaced due to some idiot who thought they could drive while using their cell phone (either talking or texting, does not matter) and hit me while I was in the crosswalk with the "WALK" signal prominently displayed.

Nowadays, it seems no pedestrian should even think of using the crosswalks and traffic/pedestrian signals. Instead, "jaywalk." However, there are some places where "jaywalking" is more dangerous.

rmfr

DonM435
2015-Aug-17, 05:20 AM
I'm usually tolerant of another driver trying to merge into traffic, but if he/she has a phone pressed to his/her/its ear, well, let 'em bloody well wait. You're gonna drive with one hand and half your meager brain, can't give the rest of your full attention, why should we take notice? Hope you're enjoying your vital conversation there.

Jens
2015-Aug-17, 06:03 AM
Another issue here is that if there's a crash during a chase, the officers involved come under very close scrutiny. Chases get called off if speeds are reached that are "too high". The general feeling is that it's better to let one crim get away (and try to get them later), than to risk an innocent bystander getting crashed into or run over. Fair enough, but has encouraged some runners.

It's a real concern. When I was in high school the mother of a classmate was killed when a police in pursuit of another car ran a red light and slammed into her car.

arakish
2015-Aug-17, 08:12 AM
Fair enough, but has encouraged some runners.

And, that is the ultimate problem. It has begun to encourage toooo many runners.

rmfr

JohnD
2015-Aug-17, 08:47 AM
In the progs I referred to, it is notable that the Police DO slow down to pass red lit junctions, even in 'hot pursuit'. They also drive on the wrong side of traffic bollards ('central refuges') and commit other offences that would get a civilian driver banned, but these guys are pursuit-trained, and are only authorised to go after a "Failed to stop" if they are so trained. The radio exchange that gives that authorisation is sometimes is heard on these progs, as is the conversation that tells them to back off in the interests of safety.
Its the availability of a helicopter is usually the factor that tells the pursuers to back off, as the fastest road car cannot out run a chopper.

John

DonM435
2015-Aug-17, 03:37 PM
Of course, other drivers on the road should slow down and get the heck out of the way when the official vehicle with all the lights comes by. That's what I do anyway.

swampyankee
2015-Aug-23, 05:24 PM
A race car driver never drives too fast. Think about it.

The race driver who killed the Fast & Furious actor a while ago certainly was driving too fast.

ToSeek
2015-Aug-27, 04:11 PM
That last part is the difficult one. It's a real judgment call to have to decide if there's a danger the person behind you might rear end you. It would seem safer to say that all cars must apt their brakes as soon as the light turns yellow, but then can accelerate and pass through the intersection once they've entered the white line. But it would waste gasoline.

I once stopped at a yellow light, then looked at my rear-view mirror and realized the van behind me wasn't going to be able to stop in the space I left him. So I scooted about a car-length forward, which left him just enough room to come to a halt.

danscope
2015-Aug-27, 06:52 PM
Lucky you looked. If I suspect the light is going yellow, I tap my break a couple times (trying to alert the car behind me). Of course, if the driver is texting or 'engaged' on the cell phone, they don't see much of anything while they drive so....

swampyankee
2015-Aug-29, 09:32 PM
Recently (the 26th) my daughter was making a perfectly sound left turn (the police who responded said so) when a "driver" rammed her. He did not put on his brakes. He was also missing his license, was driving a car without registration or valid plates, and was handcuffed and taken away.

My daughter got a ride to the ER, where they found out that -- except for some minor scrapes, bruising, airbag burns, and muscle pain, she was OK.

Jim
2015-Aug-30, 07:27 PM
Recently (the 26th) my daughter ... she was OK.

Good to hear.

swampyankee
2015-Aug-31, 02:11 PM
Good to hear.

Thank you.