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Kyle
2002-Jul-01, 08:18 AM
How's it going everyone?
As I understand it, there is a fervor of attention on the subject of a mission to Mars. People are offering all kinds of ideas for our journey there, but I haven't seen much in the way of astronaut psychology protection. With the most common route and space craft types, the 7 to 20 people that may possibly go to the red planet may possibly go mad! What kind of recreation could and should be involved??

Kyle

kucharek
2002-Jul-01, 08:50 AM
I'd say this point is often over-emphasized. These guys are not sitting around like we in a commuter train waiting for arrival. On the flight to Mars, they will surely be busy doing interplanetary research, maintaining the spacecraft, doing simulations and training of the landing etc and housekeeping. On the way back they additionally will have to sort their scientific harvest, do debriefings and already may do some research on rocks and other probes they collected, at least for biological activity (any Martians there?).
I'd rank boredom/going mad very low on possible problems of an interplanetary flight.

Harald

xriso
2002-Jul-01, 08:57 AM
On 2002-07-01 04:18, Kyle wrote:
How's it going everyone?
As I understand it, there is a fervor of attention on the subject of a mission to Mars. People are offering all kinds of ideas for our journey there, but I haven't seen much in the way of astronaut psychology protection. With the most common route and space craft types, the 7 to 20 people that may possibly go to the red planet may possibly go mad! What kind of recreation could and should be involved??

Kyle


I've heard that it would take 6 months to get there. I could definitely understand certain people going crazy on that journey, and they know that once they set out for Mars, it's likely going to be a one-way trip. I'm sure that sane people would be selected, and as somebody noted above me, they'd have plenty to do.

They would probably also have a lot of problems with radiation from the Sun over that duration.

On a related note, WHY would we send people to Mars any time soon? Is there something that our probes can't study for us? Then again, this didn't stop the Moon landing, did it?


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: xriso on 2002-07-01 05:00 ]</font>

Kyle
2002-Jul-01, 09:48 AM
On 2002-07-01 04:57, xriso wrote:


On 2002-07-01 04:18, Kyle wrote:
How's it going everyone?
As I understand it, there is a fervor of attention on the subject of a mission to Mars. People are offering all kinds of ideas for our journey there, but I haven't seen much in the way of astronaut psychology protection. With the most common route and space craft types, the 7 to 20 people that may possibly go to the red planet may possibly go mad! What kind of recreation could and should be involved??

Kyle


I've heard that it would take 6 months to get there. I could definitely understand certain people going crazy on that journey, and they know that once they set out for Mars, it's likely going to be a one-way trip. I'm sure that sane people would be selected, and as somebody noted above me, they'd have plenty to do.

They would probably also have a lot of problems with radiation from the Sun over that duration.

On a related note, WHY would we send people to Mars any time soon? Is there something that our probes can't study for us? Then again, this didn't stop the Moon landing, did it?






Well, our exploration of Mars is roughly equal to 4% of the whole planet, and even less when you are looking specifically for life. New evidence comes up all the time that upsets older conceptions. Consider recent evidence of an active water cycle on the red planet. Satellite photos are revealing a water involved surface. Water and life are good bedfellows here on Earth, so why not there? One way to find out.
Besides, our computers and creations aren't nearly a partial substitute for human presence. The only surefire way is to actually go there. If you wanted to visit Washington State- to breath in the air, to feel the soil, to see the cities and the wildlife- would you send a probe, or would you save your money and go yourself.
Reasoning that we have no business going anytime soon is a very bad line of reasoning. I mean, why do we fall in love, why do we give each other birthday presents, why do we worship Gods?? None of these are economically viable. For that matter we take up valuble space here and spend way to much money living- we should all just kill ourselves, right??
Exploring the universe, starting with Mars, is part of our desire to find a friend in the cosmos. It is a testament to our ability to answer our questions- why are we here?

Sorry, didn't mean to pull out that soapbox.

Kyle

Kyle
2002-Jul-01, 09:53 AM
On 2002-07-01 04:50, kucharek wrote:
I'd say this point is often over-emphasized. These guys are not sitting around like we in a commuter train waiting for arrival. On the flight to Mars, they will surely be busy doing interplanetary research, maintaining the spacecraft, doing simulations and training of the landing etc and housekeeping. On the way back they additionally will have to sort their scientific harvest, do debriefings and already may do some research on rocks and other probes they collected, at least for biological activity (any Martians there?).
I'd rank boredom/going mad very low on possible problems of an interplanetary flight.

Harald



Your'e right- there would be alot of that kind of activity, but there would have to something to ground the psyke. I mean, we all go to work, we all got school. But you know what they say- "All work, no Play..."
We need breaks, something to distract us from a scource of stress. With enough stress, even postal workers aren't safe. Trap these guys in a small "cheaper, faster, better" spacecraft will possibly lead to some negative emotions, maybe violence under the right conditions.


Kyle

Kyle
2002-Jul-01, 09:56 AM
[/quote]

I've heard that it would take 6 months to get there. I could definitely understand certain people going crazy on that journey, and they know that once they set out for Mars, it's likely going to be a one-way trip. I'm sure that sane people would be selected, and as somebody noted above me, they'd have plenty to do.

They would probably also have a lot of problems with radiation from the Sun over that duration.

On a related note, WHY would we send people to Mars any time soon? Is there something that our probes can't study for us? Then again, this didn't stop the Moon landing, did it?


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: xriso on 2002-07-01 05:00 ]</font>
[/quote]



Radiation from the sun?? We can protect against that, can't we?? I mean it may be an insane amount or something, but we got to the moon.

Kyle

Conrad
2002-Jul-01, 10:59 AM
I think the problem with any voyage to Mars would be the probability of a solar event (not too sure of the terminology here so I'll leave it vague!). Given the 6 months it would take top get there, there is a far higher chance of the astronauts getting zapped by Mr Sun than on the far shorter trip to the Moon.
You also left out the exercise that the crew would have to undertake to avoid or minimise things like muscle wastage; this would take up quite a chunk of their time.

Kaptain K
2002-Jul-01, 11:04 AM
Long periods of isolation on exploratory expeditions are not new. In recent centuries, crews spent years not only away from home, but out of contact with home. The Shackleford antarctic expedition in the early 20th century spent months stranded on an iceberg, after their ship was crushed by the ice, before being rescued. AFAIK their sanity was not permenently impaired.

Congratulations, Conrad!!!
_________________
When all is said and done - sit down and shut up!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Kaptain K on 2002-07-01 07:08 ]</font>

David Hall
2002-Jul-01, 02:09 PM
There are people right now spending months cooped up in the cramped quarters of nuclear submarines and such. Sure, they don't usually spend a couple of years without freedom, but they have gone long stretches under very similar conditions to what Mars travellers would experience.

Other people have spent years in the isolation of prisons or other involuntary isolation, and have come out just fine.

The important thing is to select people who don't have a psychological problem with isolation. Give them enough to do, a specific goal to look forward to (not very difficult here), and sufficient activities to occupy their free time, and I don't see any problem.

Russ
2002-Jul-01, 03:32 PM
On 2002-07-01 10:09, David Hall wrote:
There are people right now spending months cooped up in the cramped quarters of nuclear submarines and such. Sure, they don't usually spend a couple of years without freedom, but they have gone long stretches under very similar conditions to what Mars travellers would experience.

Have you ever met anyone from a Boomer crew?? I've worked with about a dozen over the years and if you don't think those guys are more than a half bubble off plumb you don't think anybody is. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Kaptain K
2002-Jul-01, 07:01 PM
Have you ever met anyone from a Boomer crew?? I've worked with about a dozen over the years and if you don't think those guys are more than a half bubble off plumb you don't think anybody is.
Yeah, but. Is it a cause or effect? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_confused.gif

Argos
2002-Jul-01, 07:16 PM
On 2002-07-01 04:18, Kyle wrote:
How's it going everyone?
As I understand it, there is a fervor of attention on the subject of a mission to Mars. People are offering all kinds of ideas for our journey there, but I haven't seen much in the way of astronaut psychology protection. With the most common route and space craft types, the 7 to 20 people that may possibly go to the red planet may possibly go mad! What kind of recreation could and should be involved??

Kyle


There was some discussion about the conditions for a long term space travel over this link

Interstellar Exploration (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?topic=683&forum=1)

SpacedOut
2002-Jul-01, 07:24 PM
On 2002-07-01 15:01, Kaptain K wrote:

Have you ever met anyone from a Boomer crew?? I've worked with about a dozen over the years and if you don't think those guys are more than a half bubble off plumb you don't think anybody is.
Yeah, but. Is it a cause or effect? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_confused.gif



From the submarinars I've known - its a Pre-requisite! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

[sp]

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: SpacedOut on 2002-07-01 15:25 ]</font>

Peter B
2002-Jul-02, 03:31 AM
I think you could learn a bit by looking at the crews who've been on space stations for long periods already - places like Skylab, the various Salyuts, Mir and the ISS. My understanding is that their time is carefully organised so that they have work and recreation periods.

Another point to understand is that the people going to Mars are going to be HIGHLY motivated. They'll be people who desperately want to go to Mars; they'll have been training for the mission for a few years; and they'll be living in a spotlight of media and public attention, and they'll most likely be the sort of people to lap it up. Just imagine how much of their time could be taken up by answering emails! (If such an activity were permitted.)

beskeptical
2002-Jul-02, 03:55 AM
I recently watched a much improved version of what Lewis and Clark did on their journey west. They did have a bit more exercise room but they also spent many months waiting for winter to pass. One of those waits was 9 or 10 months of Oregon Coast rain. That can give you serious cabin fever.

For sanity, I'd want a small private space where I could withdraw from interaction on occasion, some little project like a special garden, and one or more crew members that had and could play a guitar, like around a campfire. I think that would be enough, assuming brain engaging and creature comfort needs were addressed of course.

I think I could stare out the portals for days on end without getting too bored. Now that I think about it, put me on the volunteer list. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Russ
2002-Jul-02, 02:32 PM
On 2002-07-01 15:01, Kaptain K wrote:

Have you ever met anyone from a Boomer crew?? I've worked with about a dozen over the years and if you don't think those guys are more than a half bubble off plumb you don't think anybody is.
Yeah, but. Is it a cause or effect? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_confused.gif

Does it matter? I met Story Musgrave at a star party. He was pretty strange. I don't know if that was because of all the time he spent in space or because he has about a million IQ or he's just plain nuts. He tended to talk in incompleet sentences, like he expected you to follow what he was thinking and just fill in the rest for yourself. Along the same line he tended to finish your sentences for you. I guess you can't have 7 doctorate degrees and not be a little strange.