PDA

View Full Version : Bad Ad on this page!



John Dlugosz
2005-Jan-27, 07:24 PM
I noticed a minute ago that the Google ads at the bottom of the forum had a bunch of stuff on someone named Veronica Mars, which has nothing to do with the planet. That happens a lot here. But one link on meteorites for sale caught my interest.

So, how about a rock that came from the "dark side of the moon"? http://www.arizonaskiesmeteorites.com/AZ_Skies_Links/NWA482/index.html Like, they knew it was local night when it was ejected?

--John

beskeptical
2005-Jan-27, 07:50 PM
There might be some particular geology on the 'dark side' that matches the rock's composition.

Here's more:

Interpretation: (http://www.lunarrock.com/Research.asp?m=4)
NWA 482 is a very fresh sample of ferroan anorthosite from the ancient lunar highlands crust.

and

It is defined as being KREEP-poor which indicates it came from an area of the moon not previously sampled by the Apollo or Luna missions.

The site selling the rock is legit.

Wally
2005-Jan-27, 08:57 PM
sure does look like a hunk of granite to me, but I'll have to assume it's legit as well. No one would be as bold as to sell ordinary rock as moon rock, right??? :)

regardless, it's a bit pricey, ain't it!

teddyv
2005-Jan-28, 12:31 AM
I've only seen a few meteorites in museums, but these seem odd, particularly in their shape. That being said, I don't expect every meteorite to be a rounded peice of slag. :-?

Fram
2005-Jan-28, 09:30 AM
two spectacular, large pieces

At 545 milligram and 628 milligram, what size are those pieces really? I have a feeling that the images are a bit greater than reality for these 'large' pieces.

teddyv
2005-Jan-28, 06:16 PM
two spectacular, large pieces

At 545 milligram and 628 milligram, what size are those pieces really? I have a feeling that the images are a bit greater than reality for these 'large' pieces.

At an estimated specific gravity of 2.7, the smaller is equivalent to 10cmx10cmx15cm.

pghnative
2005-Jan-28, 06:46 PM
two spectacular, large pieces

At 545 milligram and 628 milligram, what size are those pieces really? I have a feeling that the images are a bit greater than reality for these 'large' pieces.

At an estimated specific gravity of 2.7, the smaller is equivalent to 10cmx10cmx15cm.

uh...no, try 1cm x 1 cm x 0.2 cm.

(you've described an object that is 1500 cubic centimeters, or 1.5 liters, or about 4 kgs at 2.7 SG)

edited to add: these objects are about 1/5th the weight of a US penny.

teddyv
2005-Jan-28, 07:15 PM
two spectacular, large pieces

At 545 milligram and 628 milligram, what size are those pieces really? I have a feeling that the images are a bit greater than reality for these 'large' pieces.

At an estimated specific gravity of 2.7, the smaller is equivalent to 10cmx10cmx15cm.

uh...no, try 1cm x 1 cm x 0.2 cm.

(you've described an object that is 1500 cubic centimeters, or 1.5 liters, or about 4 kgs at 2.7 SG)

edited to add: these objects are about 1/5th the weight of a US penny.

:oops: :oops:
Whoops, missed the milligram part. #-o

Fram
2005-Jan-28, 09:45 PM
That's what I thought :D
A rather misleading picture, no? Perhaps it should have a scale bar, and a ranslation of that scale bar to yards 8)

beskeptical
2005-Jan-29, 06:45 AM
I've seen Moon rocks and am familiar with both meteorites and the web site. It's legit. That's what a Moon meteorite looks like. These specimens are rare and well known when found.

When a new Mars or Moon rock is identified it makes the news in meteorite circles. Most (all?) meteorites are classified and their find location and type can be found in several catalogs. There are 14 or so, I've lost count, Mars meteorites identified. I don't know how many Moon meteorites there are, but they are very few.

The Moon rocks brought back from the Apollo missions are illegal to own. Someone had one that was supposedly a gift from someone in the government and even it was repossessed. I can't remember the details so I could be mistaken.

Anyway, they won't have any trouble selling that meteorite at the asking price. Guess you have to like the idea of holding things from space. I have a few little pieces and one big Iron meteorite. Hey, what's money when you can hold a piece of the early solar system that is billions of years old in your hand. 8)

beskeptical
2005-Jan-29, 06:49 AM
Here's a picture (http://www.lunarrock.com/Sales.asp?m=6) of what 2mg. of the same rock looks like. It's pretty small. :o

And here's the whole thing (http://www.lunarrock.com/Default.asp?m=1) before it was cut up.