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View Full Version : What lives would be like if Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction never occured?



Inclusa
2015-Oct-16, 04:06 AM
The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction was known for disappearance of non-avian dinosaurs and other species.
What might lives be like if the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction never happened?

KaiYeves
2015-Oct-16, 03:12 PM
How Stuff Works- What if dinosaurs were alive today? http://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/what-if/what-if-dinosaurs-alive1.htm

BigDon
2015-Oct-16, 03:37 PM
There is also a large illustrated "coffee table" book on the same thing. "Inter-dimensional" travel found that in the next Earth over the Chicxulub impactor missed.

One of the things to remember is the 65 million years of further evolution. As far the famous predators go it's mainly the allosaurids and abelisaurids that control the lower latitudes while the tyrannosaurids took over the northern niches.

Artic adapted tyrannosaurs are half the size of T. rex and retained the neotinous feature of down all over their bodies.

They manage to look terrifying and adorable at the same time.

Inclusa
2015-Oct-17, 09:12 AM
Birds appeared more or less during the late Jurassic, but I guess the diversity of dinosaurs might be greater than now.
Then again, only Aves (a class under dinosauria) survived beyond the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, and why?

swampyankee
2015-Oct-17, 12:03 PM
Mammals would probably have remained small, so megafauna like mamoths would not have existed, nor would the great apes. Whether dinosaurian astronomers would be looking for funding for space telescopes is an unanswerable question.

Inclusa
2015-Oct-18, 06:11 AM
Mammals would probably have remained small, so megafauna like mamoths would not have existed, nor would the great apes. Whether dinosaurian astronomers would be looking for funding for space telescopes is an unanswerable question.

Since extinct dinosaurians all have lower brain/body proportion than modern birds (the extant dinosaurians, as they are under dinosauria), we usually assume that they are "dumber" than modern birds.
Then again, is it true that extant reptiles are inferior in intelligence to most birds?

BigDon
2015-Oct-18, 05:29 PM
The exceptions would be both crocodiles and there kin, and the varanids like the monitors.

KaiYeves
2015-Oct-18, 08:20 PM
The exceptions would be both crocodiles and there kin, and the varanids like the monitors.

I'd heard that varanids can recognize different keepers and even be trained somewhat, but I didn't know about crocodilians.

So I looked it up and found this story about a housetrained croc! Wow! http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/extraordinary-lives-of-crocs.html

Noclevername
2015-Oct-18, 09:52 PM
Even in these days of steampunk, "What if the dinosaurs hadn't died" is still the most common alternate history scenario that doesn't involve Hitler.

KaiYeves
2015-Oct-19, 12:14 AM
Even in these days of steampunk, "What if the dinosaurs hadn't died" is still the most common alternate history scenario that doesn't involve Hitler.

It's certainly popular, but I don't know if it's ahead of "What if the Confederacy won the American Civil War?"

BigDon
2015-Oct-19, 03:51 PM
I'd heard that varanids can recognize different keepers and even be trained somewhat, but I didn't know about crocodilians.

So I looked it up and found this story about a housetrained croc! Wow! http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/extraordinary-lives-of-crocs.html

Look up Youtube videos of Smaug the Komodo dragon. His reasoning abilities are nothing less than astounding.

Inclusa
2015-Oct-20, 03:35 AM
Look up Youtube videos of Smaug the Komodo dragon. His reasoning abilities are nothing less than astounding.

Komodo dragons are venomous and dangerous and therefore unapproachable for the general public; many people have experience with savannah monitors, though.

Noclevername
2015-Oct-20, 05:32 AM
Komodo dragons are venomous and dangerous and therefore unapproachable for the general public; many people have experience with savannah monitors, though.

Who does?

KaiYeves
2015-Oct-20, 05:52 AM
Komodo dragons are venomous and dangerous and therefore unapproachable for the general public; many people have experience with savannah monitors, though.

They certainly should not be kept as pets (aside from the claws and deadly bite, they're rare and protected by law), but the general public can observe them at many fine zoos in safety.

BigDon
2015-Oct-20, 04:52 PM
Komodo dragons are venomous and dangerous and therefore unapproachable for the general public; many people have experience with savannah monitors, though.

Smaug lives in a zoo.

He's had one handler his whole life. He now anticipates and helps his keeper with things like weighing and such. When he sees the scales, for instance, he walks over to the platform himself and then waits to be weighed. This is without food/treat rewards.

They trained him young that he's only being fed when the keeper is wearing blue gloves. This seems to stop reflexive snacking on small quick objects like hands and feet.

Inclusa
2015-Dec-15, 06:13 AM
Can you imagine apatosaurus farmers? They are in the movie The Good Dinosaur.