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Jens
2015-Nov-13, 05:54 AM
I don't remember seeing any threads about this, but isn't that rocket part suppose to reenter in about 30 minutes?

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-13, 06:03 AM
I don't remember seeing any threads about this, but isn't that rocket part suppose to reenter in about 30 minutes?

You must be referring to the object I posted in the exploration thread (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?150057-Will-space-debris-make-space-exploration-impossible&p=2323648#post2323648). Not read anything lately but it is supposed to enter today.

Latest article

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/space-flight-news/still-unidentified-wt1190f-falls-to-earth-tonight/


An unidentified object discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on Oct. 3 will fall to Earth tonight, burning up in the sky about 60 miles (100 km) off the coast of Sri Lanka.

Designated WT1190F, the six-foot (two-meter) wide object is believed to be man-made, possibly an old rocket booster used to launch one of the Apollo Moon missions, China’s Chang’e 3 Moon lander, or an older Chinese or Russian Moon mission.

Noclevername
2015-Nov-13, 06:07 AM
I don't remember seeing any threads about this, but isn't that rocket part suppose to reenter in about 30 minutes?

http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?159110-Asteroid-Rocket-Stage-Whatever-it-is-WT1190F-Plunges-to-Earth-Tonight

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-13, 02:56 PM
Spectacular Breakup of WT1190F Seen by Airborne Astronomers

http://www.universetoday.com/123400/spectacular-breakup-of-wt1190f-seen-by-airborne-astronomers/


The International Astronomical Center (IAC) and the United Arab Emirates Space Agency hosted a rapid response team to study the re-entry of what was almost certainly a rocket stage from an earlier Apollo moon shot or the more recent Chinese Chang’e 3 mission. In an airplane window high above the clouds, the crew, which included Peter Jenniskens, Mike Koop and Jim Albers of the SETI Institute along with German, UK and United Arab Emirates astronomers, took still images, video and gathered high-resolution spectra of the breakup.

publiusr
2015-Nov-13, 10:57 PM
I seem to remember something like this was done for Mir. The Progress did a full depletion burn, so the aircraft missed it--but folks on some islands got a treat they thought they wouldn't get.