PDA

View Full Version : Lead Alice Experiment



Copernicus
2015-Dec-05, 05:04 PM
There is an image in the upper right hand corner, in the following link, that is a scattering of particles from two lead ions colliding. Is this, in any way, the expectation, of what the big bang may look like over billions of years.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/11/cern-starts-first-lead-collisions-in-upgraded-large-hadron-collider/

The reason I am asking this is that I do believe that physicists do see space farther than 13.8 blllion light years, but I can't help but think that the light could be curving just like we see the particles in this atlas experiment. Is this still possible, according to what physicists currently know?

antoniseb
2015-Dec-05, 05:28 PM
... Is this, in any way, the expectation, of what the big bang may look like over billions of years. ...
Why would it be? The only thing that makes this similar to the Big Bang is that at one point during the early moments of the universe the temperature had cooled to about the same as as what is seen in the heavy ion collision in this experiment. There is no inflation here, there is lots of empty space around the collision here. It is not like the Big Bang. Don't look for this to be a model of the Big Bang that you can extrapolate from.

Copernicus
2015-Dec-05, 06:06 PM
I was extrapolising. Just wondering if gravity could be drawing light back over billions of light years, the way charge is drawing those particles back. At least I think it is charge, don't really know for sure.

cjameshuff
2015-Dec-05, 06:39 PM
I was extrapolising. Just wondering if gravity could be drawing light back over billions of light years, the way charge is drawing those particles back. At least I think it is charge, don't really know for sure.

Those are charged particles in an extremely strong magnetic field responding to Lorentz forces that cause them to move in spirals. They are not being drawn back toward anything. And if they were, that would be a way the event differs from the Big Bang, which was not an explosion in existing space and had no origin for things to be drawn back toward.

Copernicus
2015-Dec-05, 10:42 PM
Those are charged particles in an extremely strong magnetic field responding to Lorentz forces that cause them to move in spirals. They are not being drawn back toward anything. And if they were, that would be a way the event differs from the Big Bang, which was not an explosion in existing space and had no origin for things to be drawn back toward.

Does the magnetic field, from the collider, have more than neglible affect after the collision?

cjameshuff
2015-Dec-06, 12:14 AM
Does the magnetic field, from the collider, have more than neglible affect after the collision?

Would you say those lines are more than negligibly curved?

Copernicus
2015-Dec-06, 02:59 AM
Would you say those lines are more than negligibly curved?

They are very curved, I just thought perhaps it was a central electromagnetic force, but I guess I was wrong.