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View Full Version : Our Highest Resolution Views Yet of Pluto’s Surface



Fraser
2015-Dec-06, 06:11 PM
The New Horizons spacecraft has been slowly sending back all the images and data it gathered during its July flyby of the Pluto system. The latest batch of images to arrive here on Earth contains some of the highest resolution views yet that it captured of Pluto’s surface, taken during the spacecraft’s closest approach. The […]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/123751/our-highest-resolution-views-yet-of-plutos-surface/)

Jetlack
2015-Dec-06, 06:59 PM
Stunning photo. The landscape looks very dynamic.

efanton
2015-Dec-06, 07:18 PM
Some amazing photo's.
With some trees or vegetation you would be forgiven for thinking they are from earth's Arctic wilderness



It always baffled me why they have not set up a proper communications network for our solar system. The average downlink rate is between 1-4 kilobits per second for these images from Pluto

Surely the building of dozens of dedicated cube sats for data transmission (much like routers that make up our world wide web) would not be that expensive and if kept small could piggyback existing missions sent out across our solar system before either being dropped of at a LaGrange point or large orbits of moons and planets.
After all most of the time they would not be transmitting or receiving data, so a solar panel, or nuclear power source and good battery storage could mean that they remain charging for months and then almost drain their battery for short periods of time when mission data requires transmission. The more that were launched the smaller these satellites could be.

Hornblower
2015-Dec-07, 02:51 AM
Some amazing photo's.
With some trees or vegetation you would be forgiven for thinking they are from earth's Arctic wilderness



It always baffled me why they have not set up a proper communications network for our solar system. The average downlink rate is between 1-4 kilobits per second for these images from Pluto

Surely the building of dozens of dedicated cube sats for data transmission (much like routers that make up our world wide web) would not be that expensive and if kept small could piggyback existing missions sent out across our solar system before either being dropped of at a LaGrange point or large orbits of moons and planets.
After all most of the time they would not be transmitting or receiving data, so a solar panel, or nuclear power source and good battery storage could mean that they remain charging for months and then almost drain their battery for short periods of time when mission data requires transmission. The more that were launched the smaller these satellites could be.New Horizons is transmitting with all the power it can muster with the power supply and electronics that the launch vehicle was capable of lifting, and receiving the signal at a range of some 3 billion miles requires large dish antennas on the ground. I cannot imagine how a device small enough to have been piggybacked on something like Galileo or Cassini could even detect such a feeble signal, let alone serve as a relay or repeater. Can you give us any technical details on how you would do it, provided your device could hitch a ride on the next interplanetary mission?