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View Full Version : Beatrice Tinsley, who helped us discover how galaxies evolve-Birthday today



karthikaqpt
2016-Jan-27, 07:34 AM
On 27 January 2016, the 75th anniversary of her birth, Google published a Doodle to honour her work
Beatrice Muriel Hill Tinsley(27 January 1941 to 23 March 1981)
The Search Engine Google is showing a Doodle for the 75th Birthday of Beatrice Tinsley, in few countries.
Beatrice Tinsley was a British born - New Zealand astronomer and cosmologist whose research made fundamental contributions to the astronomical understanding of how galaxies evolve with time.
Tinsley completed pioneering theoretical studies of how populations of stars age and affect the observable qualities of galaxies
She was known about the evolution of galaxies, how did galaxies form, and how did they change over time.She was discovered that young galaxies are brighter and bluer.Watch this video to know about Beatrice Tinsley (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UFSjZbVvmw)

PetersCreek
2016-Jan-27, 08:26 PM
OP banned as a known spammer but since the post is topical it remains for your enjoyment.

ngc3314
2016-Jan-27, 10:25 PM
Yes, it's hard to overstate the contribution her (all too sparse) body of work made to our understanding of galaxies and their evolution. She basically grabbed astronomy kicking and screaming and pointed out that stellar populations must evolve so fast that we we look at distant galaxies they must have been quite different. May be obvious enough in hindsight, but at the time there was a pretty substantial investment in the idea that one could do cosmology by measuring distant galaxies and making quite modest corrections for these evolutionary effects. She demonstrated that the effects were large enough that uncertainties in applying them to galaxies left even the sign of the corrections in doubt. As the later editor of the Astrophysical Journal wrote in a centennial collection issue (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AAS...19513004K), after Tinsley's work, "galaxy evolution, not cosmology, became the raison d'etre for deep surveys". He wrote a longer appreciation here (http://www.aas.org/cswa/status/2005/JANUARY2005/BeatriceTinsley.html).

George
2016-Jan-29, 04:16 PM
Yes, it's hard to overstate the contribution her (all too sparse) body of work made to our understanding of galaxies and their evolution. She basically grabbed astronomy kicking and screaming and pointed out that stellar populations must evolve so fast that we we look at distant galaxies they must have been quite different. May be obvious enough in hindsight, but at the time there was a pretty substantial investment in the idea that one could do cosmology by measuring distant galaxies and making quite modest corrections for these evolutionary effects. She demonstrated that the effects were large enough that uncertainties in applying them to galaxies left even the sign of the corrections in doubt. I assume her work was also important as further evidence favoring Big Bang. Morphological differences with distance is strong evidence against the Static and Steady State theories of the past.


As the later editor of the Astrophysical Journal wrote in a centennial collection issue (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AAS...19513004K), after Tinsley's work, "galaxy evolution, not cosmology, became the raison d'etre for deep surveys". He wrote a longer appreciation here (http://www.aas.org/cswa/status/2005/JANUARY2005/BeatriceTinsley.html). Thanks, I wondered where the Big Bang metaphorical raisons in an isotropic loaf of bread idea came from. [It's Friday. ;)]

ngc3314
2016-Jan-30, 07:49 PM
I assume her work was also important as further evidence favoring Big Bang. Morphological differences with distance is strong evidence against the Static and Steady State theories of the past.

It's heartbreaking that she saw only the first inklings - Butcher and Oemler's work showing unexpectedly blue galaxy population in rich clusters - in the final couple of years of her life, while the rich morphological information on distant galaxies from HST came only a decade later. There was a spirited Twitter discussion this week along some concerned astronomers about the extent to which even now we've been able to build the kind of model of a galaxy she had in mind.