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tony873004
2016-Feb-02, 07:48 AM
...and you passed through the heart of the Pleiades once per orbit?

I wondered this, so I simulated it.

It would look like this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxckMdS6btQ

There's no audio in this youtube, so open another tab and choose Space Oddity by David Bowie, or another soundtrack of your preference, and then go full screen on this.

John Mendenhall
2016-Feb-02, 03:56 PM
...and you passed through the heart of the Pleiades once per orbit?

I wondered this, so I simulated it.

It would look like this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxckMdS6btQ

There's no audio in this youtube, so open another tab and choose Space Oddity by David Bowie, or another soundtrack of your preference, and then go full screen on this.

Beautiful ! Thank you!

I had to play the trip through the Pleiades several times. Thi is much better than typical cinema and TV work.

Regards, John M.

slang
2016-Feb-02, 08:59 PM
That might make a nice APOD. Have they been in touch yet? :)

chornedsnorkack
2016-Feb-06, 07:37 AM
...and you passed through the heart of the Pleiades once per orbit?

I wondered this, so I simulated it.


How could you know the position of Pleiades in radial direction? At that distance, the error of parallax is larger than the radial distance between Pleiades - yet these unknowable radial distances are presumably at a similar magnitude as the transverse distances.

DaveC426913
2016-Feb-06, 03:12 PM
Don't suppose you'd care to put up a version that's a little faster - and shorter than 14 minutes? ;)

Cruithne3753
2016-Feb-06, 07:04 PM
I opted for Vangelis, Heaven and Hell part 1, from 12.49 onwards... you know the bit! (Even if I do enjoy a bit of Bowie, RIP)

tony873004
2016-Feb-06, 08:30 PM
I opted for Vangelis, Heaven and Hell part 1, from 12.49 onwards... you know the bit! (Even if I do enjoy a bit of Bowie, RIP)
from Cosmos! That's perfect. Even the parts before 12:49 go well.


Don't suppose you'd care to put up a version that's a little faster - and shorter than 14 minutes? ;)
You can control the length with the pause button :)
But the goal was to provide something lengthy without looping. Each orbit is different, as the stars undergo proper motion.
I like this speed, it syncs well with the type of soundtracks that would go well with this.

You could run the sim directly, rather than in YouTube. Then you can control the ship's speed. You can also control the 400 LY radius by changing the "400" in the RA box.
http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySimulatorCloud/stars.html?400,39,60,65,22,60,1200,2000,1000,0.001 ,100,0.4,5,0,1,0,1,15,0.5,0000ff,0,0,1,1,1,4,88,1, 4,30,1,4,170,1,4,255,1,4,340,1,4,465,1,4,530,1,4,6 60,1,260,30,1,260,200,103,1,515,30,0.5,0000ff,0,0, 0,0

publiusr
2016-Feb-06, 09:20 PM
Space...the final frontier...where's the Ent-

Drat-they've dropped the eleven footer! Blast you! I should have known not to hire the man who dropped the roof on Buran during the renovation!

tony873004
2016-Feb-07, 06:16 AM
How could you know the position of Pleiades in radial direction? At that distance, the error of parallax is larger than the radial distance between Pleiades - yet these unknowable radial distances are presumably at a similar magnitude as the transverse distances.
I don't. I just downloaded the the HYG3 catalog from astronexus, which gives enough data to compute both tangential and radial positions and velocities, and trusted they got it right. If its not, its their fault :)

I'm sure there's a lot of big error bars in any of the star-based sims I post. In the coming years, we'll have GAIA satellite data, and I'll have to redo a lot of stuff.

chornedsnorkack
2016-Feb-07, 08:37 AM
In the coming years, we'll have GAIA satellite data, and I'll have to redo a lot of stuff.

No, we shall not. Gaia is dazzled by any stars brighter than magnitude 6, so locations of visible stars shall remain unknown.

Hornblower
2016-Feb-07, 06:05 PM
No, we shall not. Gaia is dazzled by any stars brighter than magnitude 6, so locations of visible stars shall remain unknown.

GAIA's measurements of the much more numerous fainter stars that dominate the cluster gravitationally will firm up their relative positions and should help with our understanding of the cluster's dynamics. My educated guess is that the experts can firm up constraints on estimates of the relative positions of the bright stars with increasingly sharp astrometric work with other instruments. Tony's future simulations may not be exact but they will be improved.

tony873004
2016-Feb-07, 06:27 PM
No, we shall not. Gaia is dazzled by any stars brighter than magnitude 6, so locations of visible stars shall remain unknown.
They're not unknown. There's just big error bars on them.

Parallax is not the only method of estimating distance. Having Gaia's data on nearly a billion dimmer stars will give us a few more rungs on our "Cosmic Distance Ladder" and help us refine standard candle models which can then be applied to the brighter yet further stars that make up much of the familiar constellations.

As far as the individual star in the Pleiades, I'm only guessing here, since I didn't make the star catalog that I used in the animation, but since they're in the same cluster, I imagine they're similar in metalicity. So for 2 stars that are the same color, the dimmer one is farther. They're also embedded in a nebula. The more distant ones will show more extinction.

Alfonso
2016-Mar-01, 07:35 AM
Nearest star is 4 light years.
400 light year orbit?
For what practical purpose?
I don't think that the sun has the gravitational force needed to capture or hold anything in its orbit at that distance.

John Mendenhall
2016-Mar-01, 12:49 PM
It doesn't. It's just a circular flight path centered on the Sun. Probably a shakedown cruise for the Enterprise after a lengthy in-port repair period.

Whoops, gotta go. Something in the portside thruster is making a clunking noise.