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Tom Mazanec
2016-Feb-04, 02:40 AM
Suppose tomorrow a laccolith begins to form under my current address.
Would I notice anything? Or would it take millennia instead of minutes, so that there would be no quaking or other interesting developments for a few years?

DaveC426913
2016-Feb-04, 04:42 AM
Well, according to Wiki, the laccolith in Patagonia took 162 thousand years to form.

The question then becomes: how patient are you?

grapes
2016-Feb-04, 01:40 PM
Definitely smaller quakes. But laccoliths tend to be of viscous magma, so if it formed in a hurry, it probably would be more apt to explode rather than just intrude.

Trebuchet
2016-Feb-04, 03:29 PM
I had to look up "laccolith". Any day a post inspires me to learn something is a good one.

But I can't help wishing this had been posted in "Geology and Planetary Surfaces".

I think if it took minutes to form, it would more appropriately be called a volcano.

Tom Mazanec
2016-Feb-04, 04:39 PM
I had to look up "laccolith". Any day a post inspires me to learn something is a good one.

But I can't help wishing this had been posted in "Geology and Planetary Surfaces".

I think if it took minutes to form, it would more appropriately be called a volcano.

You're right, Trebuchet. I'm so used to thinking this forum is Space + everything Else that I misposted it.
Can it be moved?

grapes
2016-Feb-04, 04:45 PM
You're right, Trebuchet. I'm so used to thinking this forum is Space + everything Else that I misposted it.
Can it be moved?
OK!

Tom Mazanec
2016-Feb-05, 03:32 PM
ok!

thanks!

Eclogite
2016-Feb-06, 05:01 PM
I think if it took minutes to form, it would more appropriately be called a volcano.I understand your reasoning, but a volcano is a surface expression of igneous activity: it is extrusive in nature. A laccolith is intrusive, so regardless of its speed of formation, it is not a volcano.

grapes
2016-Feb-06, 09:37 PM
I understand your reasoning, but a volcano is a surface expression of igneous activity: it is extrusive in nature. A laccolith is intrusive, so regardless of its speed of formation, it is not a volcano.
I think what Treb means, although I could be wrong, is an intrusion that fast will become a volcano! :)

Definitely smaller quakes. But laccoliths tend to be of viscous magma, so if it formed in a hurry, it probably would be more apt to explode rather than just intrude.
Anyway, that's kinda what I meant.

Trebuchet
2016-Feb-08, 03:44 PM
Yep, that's just what I meant. The overlying surface won't be able to conform that quickly and the magma will burst through.