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Darlon
2005-Feb-03, 02:42 AM
and its about ice ages...


Do we really know when the next ice age will happen, because I keep hearing that we are going to be in the next ice age in 10 or 20 years??


I know ice ages don't happen THAT fast but I just wanted to make sure.


P.S. this is also another one of my doomsday fears that I need debunking.

Musashi
2005-Feb-03, 02:46 AM
I remember hearing that kind of stuff 15 years ago, so it seems unlikely.

mickal555
2005-Feb-03, 04:54 AM
I don't think an ice age seems that bad right about now.... its tooo hot!

John M. Dollan
2005-Feb-03, 05:28 AM
Here's a good link for this subject:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_age

...John...

Darlon
2005-Feb-03, 05:49 AM
thanks for the website John.


I think its safe to say we aren't even close to a real ice age.

frogesque
2005-Feb-04, 01:39 AM
I don't think an ice age seems that bad right about now.... its tooo hot!

Sounds as if Oz weather is a bit quirky (http://au.news.yahoo.com/050202/2/svo9.html) at the moment. 120mm of rain in 24hours is a lot of water in anyone's book :o I've heard news reports that there's also been midsummer snow down under.

Another report (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20050202/sc_afp/australiaweather_050202232958&e=3&ncid=)

EvilBob
2005-Feb-04, 03:23 AM
There has been snow - in our (normally) hottest month. The rain seems to have stopped where I am, but we had about 90 mm in the last 2 days. And Melbourne has been even harder hit.
Met Data (http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDV65250/IDV65250.94868.shtml)

Map Graphic (http://www.theage.com.au/media/2005/02/03/1107409991910.html)

edited to add link.

skrap1r0n
2005-Feb-04, 03:44 AM
I have heard, even prior to the abomination "The Day After Tomorrow", that is the ice caps melt, it will cool off the gulf stream and it could cause norther europe to freeze over. The process is thought to take between 10 and 30 years once it starts. Apparently when an Ice Age hits, it hits pretty fast...Geologically speaking.

Enzp
2005-Feb-04, 10:42 AM
If meltwater stops the gulf stream, the new ice age may commence within 30 years, but that is like saying winter will start in 30 days. The whole winter will not instantly apear. Giant glaciers won't appear overnight, they will take a long time to accumulate adn move down from the highlands at their...glacial pace.

Meteora
2005-Feb-06, 12:55 AM
Giant glaciers won't appear overnight, they will take a long time to accumulate adn move down from the highlands at their...glacial pace.

Question allegedly asked of a park ranger at Glacier National Park, Montana (USA):

"What time to the glaciers come by?"

:D

sarongsong
2005-Feb-06, 01:41 AM
[Pardon the interruption---Meteora, ah there you are---can you comment over here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=409848) when you get a chance?]---carry on...

AGN Fuel
2005-Feb-07, 02:44 AM
Sounds as if Oz weather is a bit quirky (http://au.news.yahoo.com/050202/2/svo9.html) at the moment. 120mm of rain in 24hours is a lot of water in anyone's book :o I've heard news reports that there's also been midsummer snow down under.

:evil: :evil: :evil: We had a huge hailstorm here last Wednesday that smashed my windscreen and made my car look like a panel beaters dream... :x :x :evil:

Biggest hailstones I've ever seen - I measured one that landed on concrete and broke up, but the largest fragment was still 8cm long.

Lurker
2005-Feb-07, 03:47 AM
Actually there is no real evidence that the pleistocene glaciation (the most recent ice age) has ever ended. It is quite possible that we have evolved in what is no more than an inter-glacier period of an on going pleistocene ice age. Such inter-glacial periods have marked previous advances and retreats of the ice during the pleistocene and the current period may simply be one more.

I doubt, however, that we will see a return of the ice in our lifetime or that our children will. If the pleistocene glaciation has not ended, however, it is quite possible that the ice could advance in as little as 2000 to 5000 years.

Brady Yoon
2005-Feb-08, 04:46 AM
Technically, we're in an Ice Age right now, which merely means that the mean temperature is lower than it has been in majority of Earth's history. Ice Ages are divided into glaciations and interglacials. We are in one of the interglacials, which is warmer than a glaciation, but cooler than the norm.

The next glaciation? No idea.. Global warming may somewhat offset that, though I believe nature has a far greater impact upon Earth than human activities.