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WaxRubiks
2016-Feb-18, 11:25 PM
Or is it something else, like energy from its moons?

Hornblower
2016-Feb-18, 11:32 PM
Or is it something else, like energy from its moons?

If I am not mistaken, the atmosphere of Jupiter gets more heat from inside than from the Sun, and this internal heat is mostly what is left over from the formation of the planet. I would expect tidal interaction with the large moons to cause some internal heating, but I do not have the means to figure how much.

Fiery Phoenix
2016-Feb-19, 12:11 AM
If I am not mistaken, the atmosphere of Jupiter gets more heat from inside than from the Sun, and this internal heat is mostly what is left over from the formation of the planet. I would expect tidal interaction with the large moons to cause some internal heating, but I do not have the means to figure how much.
I think this is more or less the case, and this basically applies to all four gas giants. At those distances, the Sun's heat becomes increasingly less effective and what you end up with is a planet whose main heat source is itself (or tidal interaction with large moons). Neptune in particular is a good case in point; it radiates more than twice as much energy as it receives from the Sun, which is also the main reason behind its hectic weather.

DaveC426913
2016-Feb-19, 03:03 AM
Yes, Jupiter is known for putting out more radiation than it receives. It's darned hot down there.

Noclevername
2016-Feb-19, 05:55 AM
Also, IIRC sunlight does not penetrate very far into the atmosphere of a gas giant compared to how deep that atmosphere is. Once you get past the outermost transparent layer, it's pitch dark until you reach a depth where the atmosphere itself glows from heat.

WaxRubiks
2016-Feb-19, 11:28 AM
Earth creates heat from radioactive decay; does that happen on Jupiter?
Seems like a long time for a planet to stay that hot.

tusenfem
2016-Feb-19, 11:58 AM
jupiter is still shrinking, setting free energy rhat way

Romanus
2016-Feb-23, 03:17 PM
Scientific opinion leans toward internal factors, but it may be a little of both.

Cougar
2016-Feb-26, 02:35 PM
Earth creates heat from radioactive decay; does that happen on Jupiter?

Not nearly enough unless one tweaks the equations, like they did in this 2002 paper. (http://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0112018.pdf) Tusenfem's answer is surely one component of where this heat is coming from, but various papers note the various intrinsic contributions don't seem to add up.



"Jupiter emits more radiation than it receives from the sun: the origin of this excess heat is still uncertain and debated."