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selvaarchi
2016-Feb-21, 07:53 AM
We are going to hear more and more of this mission till its launch in 2018. In recognizance, I am creating this thread dedicated to it.

For more information on the mission there is this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyPJryibTIQ) as well as here (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152582-China-s-moon-exploration-ambitions&p=2336551#post2336551) and here (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?154721-China-s-future-space-plans&p=2336493#post2336493) in our forum.

selvaarchi
2016-Apr-18, 09:30 PM
First information on an instrument from a foreign county to fly on Cheng'e 4 mission. It will be from Germany.

http://www.uni-kiel.de/pressemeldungen/index.php?pmid=2016-106-mondmission&lang=en


The tension was immense, but it was released this week, when the announcement came that one of Kiel University's instruments would be on board the next Chinese mission to the moon, Chang'E 4. "Kiel University is going to fly behind the moon!" said Jia Yu excitedly, a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics. Born in China, he will obtain his doctoral degree at Kiel University in a few months and then take over the project "Lunar Lander Neutron Dosimetry“ (LND). "We weren't sure if we would be able to implement a project like this one from Kiel with our colleagues at the National Space Science Center in Beijing", Yu reported. For this reason all those involved are even happier that it worked out.

Now that the decision has been made, the team, led by Professor Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, faces a major task. Within one year, the physicists in Kiel want to develop, build and mount the new LND experiment on the spaceship. In the final quarter of 2018, this should then fly to the moon. "A real challenge", said Lars Seimetz and Björn Schuster, the responsible mechanical and electronics engineers, "but really exciting. We can improve our designs that we developed for previous space missions." Radiation measuring instruments from Kiel have been used before in space missions by the American and European space agencies NASA and ESA: On board the Mars Rover "Curiosity", the team is currently collecting data on galactic and solar particle radiation and using it to research the potential radiation exposure for manned missions to Mars. The Kiel-based researchers provided four sensors for the "Solar Orbiter" space probe, which will also depart for space at the end of 2018 to research the sun. These sensors are to measure the spread and acceleration of solar particles. Successful experiments such as this one enabled the physicists to collect valuable experience which will be very useful when developing the LND.

selvaarchi
2016-May-16, 02:44 PM
Wow Chang'e is becoming an international mission. Above is an article of Germany's involvement, else where I have reported Russia's involvement. Now we have Sweden joining in :rimshot: :clap:

http://gbtimes.com/china/sweden-joins-chinas-historic-mission-land-far-side-moon


And Sweden’s presence is soon to be felt on the Moon once again, this time on another unprecedented journey - China’s Chang’e-4 mission to the untouched lunar far side, which is never visible from Earth due to gravitational or tidal locking.

Following an agreement signed with the National Space Science Centre (NSSC) in Beijing, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) in Kiruna in the country’s remote far north will provide one of the scientific payloads on the mission that will further our understanding of our celestial neighbour.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-10, 09:11 AM
Leonard David, from Space.com reports on the goals of Cheng'e 4.

http://www.space.com/32964-china-moon-far-side-mission-science-goals.html


Lunar objectives

CE-4 mission "propositional payloads" involve six on the lander, five payloads on the rover, and one payload on the telecommunication relay orbiter. The researchers report that the scientific objectives of CE-4 are many, including:

Study the characteristics and the formation mechanism of lunar surface floating dust;
To measure lunar surface temperature, analyzing its change with time and in different light conditions;
Measure the chemical compositions of lunar rocks and soils and study their distribution;
Carry out lunar surface low-frequency radio astronomical observation and research;
Identify the structure of cosmic rays, and to find the possible original position for these cosmic rays;
Observe the independent kilometer wave burst event from the high layer of the solar corona, investigate its radiation characteristics and mechanism, and to explore the evolution and transport of coronal mass ejection (CME) between the Sun and Earth.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-14, 09:21 PM
Wow Chang'e is becoming an international mission. Above is an article of Germany's involvement, else where I have reported Russia's involvement. Now we have Sweden joining in :rimshot: :clap:

Sorry I did not provide the link (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152582-China-s-moon-exploration-ambitions&p=2340537#post2340537) for the Russian involvement.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-15, 03:03 AM
More details on what three European countries are contributing to the mission.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/988258.shtml


The low-frequency radio spectrometer, developed in the Netherlands, will be installed on the Chang'e-4 relay satellite. The Dutch and Chinese low-frequency radio instruments will conduct unique scientific studies such as measuring auroral radio emissions from the large planets in the solar system, determining the radio background spectrum at the Earth-Moon L2 points, creating a new low-frequency map of the radio sky, and detecting bright pulsars and other radio transient phenomena.

"The Chinese and Dutch low-frequency radio spectrometers on the lander and relay satellite of Chang'e-4 might help us detect the 21-cm hydrogen line radiation and study how the earliest stars were ignited and how our cosmos emerged from darkness after the Big Bang," said Chen Xuelei, an astronomer with the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The rover will also carry an advanced small analyzer for neutrals, developed in Sweden, to study the interaction between solar winds and the moon surface.

And a neutron dosimeter, developed in Germany, will be installed on the lander to measure radiation at the landing site. Scientists say it is essential to investigate the radiation environment on the lunar surface, in preparation for human missions to the moon.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-30, 01:17 PM
Emily Lakdawalla's update on Chang'e 4. In her statement "Chang'e 5 should launch and return in 2018, before the Chang'e 4 mission." she got the year wrong. Chang'e 5 is supposed to launch next year - 2017.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2016/06220913-plans-for-change4.html


The future Chang'e 4 lunar farside landing mission is rapidly taking shape. As I described earlier this year, a relay orbiter will launch in 2018 for the Moon-Earth L2 point and a lander and rover (upgraded from Chang'e 3) will follow six months later. Now the mission's team is coming to a consensus on the landing location, as well as on the mission's instrument package. But, to the surprise of geologists in the international lunar science community, the package does not seem to include an instrument dedicated to studying the elemental chemistry of those never-before-sampled farside rocks.

News on Chang'e 4 has been coming out from a variety of sources, including mainstream media articles like this one (in Chinese), as well a paper by Wang Qiong and Liu Jizhong, recently accepted in Acta Astronautica: "A Chang’e-4 mission concept and vision of future Chinese lunar exploration activities." The launch dates quoted in the Wang and Liu article have shifted forward in time a little bit since my last article, with the relay orbiter launch expected "in the end of 2018" and the lander/rover "in the first half of 2019." Unlike missions to more distant worlds, Moon launch dates are fairly flexible and can usually be shifted a month at a time to ensure mission readiness and success at launch. I suspect Chang'e 4's schedule is sensitive to any changes to the Chang'e 5 sample return mission schedule. Chang'e 5 should launch and return in 2018, before the Chang'e 4 mission.

selvaarchi
2016-Jul-02, 09:28 AM
The Dutch are providing a Dutch-built radio antenna that will travel to the Moon aboard the Chinese Chang’e 4 satellite.

http://www.universetoday.com/129664/dutch-going-moon-chinese/


As it stands, very little is known about this part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As a result, the Dutch radio antenna could be the first to provide information on the development of the earliest structures in the Universe. It is also the first instrument to be sent into space as part of a Chinese space mission.

Alongside Heino Falcke, Marc Klein Wolt – the director of the Radboud Radio Lab – is one of the scientific advisors for the project. For years, he and Falcke have been working towards the deployment of this radio antenna, and have high hopes for the project. As Professor Wolt said about the scientific package he is helping to create:

“The instrument we are developing will be a precursor to a future radio telescope in space. We will ultimately need such a facility to map the early universe and to provide information on the development of the earliest structures in it, like stars and galaxies.”

selvaarchi
2016-Jul-05, 12:06 AM
Ever wondered how a Dutch instrument is going to the moon on Cheng'e 4. It all started with a five-year old boy, who was impressed by images of an astronaut on the moon. The rest as they say is history.:D

http://www.ru.nl/english/about-us/our-university/change-perspective/2015-2016/heino-falcke/


It’s safe to say that a generous portion of perseverance was needed for the plan. ‘I always invest a part of my time in crazy projects. Usually, they turn out to work eventually’, Falcke smiles. ‘That is also what happened here. Totally unexpected, we received a call from China last year, telling us that they would love to collaborate. From that moment on, all the plans accelerated again. Luckily we were able to move quickly. In Europe, this project would take a decade, but now we only have two years. This means that we will have to adjust our ambitions a bit, but still we grasped this opportunity with both hands.’

selvaarchi
2017-Mar-20, 02:47 PM
Saudi Arabia has agreed to contribute at least one of the experiments to be taken to the far side of the moon by Cheng'e-4.

Chang'e-4 was a backup to Chang'e-3 but with all the extra instruments foreign countries are contributing to the mission you will expect the payload to be heavier. But will it require a rocket 7 times more powerful than what launched Chang'e-3. My hunch is China has a few surprises for us and we will have to wait till the mission is in progress to find out. The lander will definitely be bigger. Will the rover too be made bigger to carry all the extra experiments to overcome the problems Yutu had.

https://spacewatchme.com/2017/03/saudi-arabia-contribute-chinas-change-4-moon-mission/


As part of his six week-long tour of Asian countries, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia has presided over a major space agreement between his Kingdom and Asia’s leading space power, China.

This prominent agreement is a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology (KACST) and the China National Space Administration (CNSA) for Saudi Arabia to contribute to and participate in the Chinese-led Chang’e-4 Moon mission, scheduled to be launched in 2018.

selvaarchi
2017-Apr-23, 11:05 AM
Now confirmation of a Swedish instrument has been handed over to China to be integrated with the Chang’e 4 rover. With the other international instruments also to be integrated into the rove it confirms my suspicion that the rover will be bigger than Yutu.

http://www.irf.se/Topical/Press/?dbfile=Swedish%20Institute%20of%20Space%20Physics %20goes%20back%20to%20the%20Moon&dbsec=P3


On April 7, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics successfully delivered the flight model of the Advanced Small Analyzer for Neutrals (ASAN) instrument to the National*Space*Science*Center of the*Chinese*Academy*of*Sciences in Beijing, China. The ASAN instrument will be launched at the end of 2018 onboard the Chinese Chang'e 4 mission to the Moon. Chang'e 4 consists of an orbiter, lander and rover.

selvaarchi
2017-Jun-14, 10:48 PM
China hope's to experiment with growing crops on the moon.

http://www.china.org.cn/china/2017-06/14/content_41023534.htm

"
Scientists in China have unveiled multiple tasks they plan to carry out as part of the lunar exploration program at the just-concluded Global Space Exploration Conference (GLEX 2017) in Beijing.

Among them, the creation of a "mini ecosystem on the moon's surface" is due to be led by researchers with Chongqing University, reports the Chongqing Morning Post.

The "mini ecosystem" will actually be contained in an 18X16cm cylinder.

It's due to be put on the moon's surface as part the Chang'e-4 mission in 2018, according to Professor Xie Gengxin, head designer of the project."


Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2017-Jun-15, 02:38 PM
More details from Andrew Jones on China's plan to gorw crops on the moon.

http://gbtimes.com/china/forget-stratospheric-chicken-sandwich-china-sending-potato-seeds-and-silkworms-moon

"Research teams with Chongqing University have developed an 18 cm high, 3 kg aluminium alloy mini-ecosystem which will incubate the biological payloads.

“The container will send potatoes, arabidopsis seeds and silkworm eggs to the surface of the Moon. The eggs will hatch into silkworms, which can produce carbon dioxide, while the potatoes and seeds emit oxygen through photosynthesis," Zhang Yuanxun, chief designer of the container, told the Chongqing Morning Post.

Temperature control and energy supply are the biggest challenges, People's Daily quotes Zhang as saying.

The experiment will be livestreamed and is expected to contribute to research towards establishing future lunar habitats."

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selvaarchi
2017-Jul-07, 02:22 PM
Germany has signed an agreement with China to participate in the Chang'e 4 mission. Though what form the participation will be was not stated.

https://sputniknews.com/science/201707051055246544-china-germany-xi-exploration/

"China National Space Administration has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the German Space Agency regarding cooperation on the Chang’e 4 lunar probe following the meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday.

"Both sides [China and Germany] will follow the path of open, innovative and win-win in their cooperation, deepening their partnership in hi-tech fields of space, smart manufacturing and industrial internet," Xi said at the joint press conference with Merkel."

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selvaarchi
2017-Dec-26, 06:23 AM
Want to send a message to the moon? It will possible in the near future.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-12/20/c_136840425.htm


China will solicit 20,000 messages which will be sent into space by a relay satellite for the Chang'e-4 lunar probe, according to China's Lunar and Deep Space Exploration Center.

The relay satellite will be launched in the first half of 2018 and Chang'e-4 lunar probe in the latter half of next year, according to the center affiliated with the China National Space Administration.

People all over the world can follow the WeChat account "slecbj" to submit their wishes from Dec. 19, 2017, to March 6, 2018.

The Chang'e-4 lunar probe will undertake the first ever soft landing on the far side of the moon and conduct in situ and roving detection and relay communication at the Earth-Moon Lagrangian 2 (L2) point, according to the center.

Launch window
2017-Dec-29, 04:15 PM
Why would they be growing crops on the Lunar surface? It's difficult to tell where the Chinese are going, their program is more open unlike the Soviet years but there is still a secretive element to it and even they China has made large steps in terms of pace, its almost glacial, they have no intention of 'racing'. The news agency Associated Press once reported that Zhuang Fenggan, vice chairman of the China Association of Sciences, declared that Chinese would create a permanent lunar base with the intent of mining the lunar soil for Helium-3 (the theory is this would fuel nuclear fusion plants on Earth) Many people speculated Chinese long term goals were either a space station or maybe Mars but here it looks like they are look to studying possibility for Colonization of the Moon?

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-29, 09:47 PM
Why would they be growing crops on the Lunar surface? It's difficult to tell where the Chinese are going, their program is more open unlike the Soviet years but there is still a secretive element to it and even they China has made large steps in terms of pace, its almost glacial, they have no intention of 'racing'. The news agency Associated Press once reported that Zhuang Fenggan, vice chairman of the China Association of Sciences, declared that Chinese would create a permanent lunar base with the intent of mining the lunar soil for Helium-3 (the theory is this would fuel nuclear fusion plants on Earth) Many people speculated Chinese long term goals were either a space station or maybe Mars but here it looks like they are look to studying possibility for Colonization of the Moon?

They are using plants to generate oxygen and food. Even the proposed CSS has one module dedicated for growing food and generating oxygen.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-02, 12:07 PM
Latest news from China confirms both parts of the Chang'e 4 mission will launch this year.

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/China_Prepares_for_Breakthrough_Change_4_Moon_Land ing_in_2018_999.html


2018 could see a breakthrough in lunar exploration: China is planning a mission that, if successful, will see a space landing on the far side of the moon for the first time.

The first part of China's Chang'e 4 space mission will launch in June. A Long March 4C rocket will carry a 425kg relay satellite and station it some 60,000km behind the moon. A second launch later in the year will send a lander and rover to the far side of the moon, guided to a safe landing by the satellite.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-12, 02:03 AM
With the the launch date of Chang'e-4 drawing ever closer, the Chinese scientist are still busy testing the rover.

https://gbtimes.com/testing-on-chinas-change-4-lunar-far-side-lander-and-rover-steps-up-in-preparation-for-launch


The lander and rover which China aims to soft-land on the far side of the Moon have entered mechanical environmental testing as preparations for launch in late 2018 step up.

The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), the main contractor for the Chinese space programme, stated yesterday that testing had started following recently completed experiments.

The process will typically involve verifying system performance while experiencing vibrations similar to those during launch and flight as well as thermal vacuum and anechoic chamber tests.

Chang'e-4 was originally manufactured at the same time as Chang'e-3 spacecraft in order to provide a backup. Testing for Chang'e-4 will also likely involve lunar landing and lunar surface simulation for the six-wheeled rover, as with the previous mission.

CASC states that new technologies have added additional challenges to the development of China's fourth lunar mission, and includes the integration of payloads provided by international cooperation.

selvaarchi
2018-Mar-02, 06:38 AM
The relay satellite for Cheng'e 4 to be launched in May or June this year, will also bring along a pair of microsatellites.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lunar-far-side-mission-to-carry-microsatellites-for-pioneering-astronomy?cat=business


China's two-launch Chang'e-4 mission to the far side of the Moon will include a pair of microsatellites to be placed in lunar orbit to test low frequency radio astronomy and space-based interferometry.

The pair, unofficially named DSLWP-A1 and DSLWP-A2, have a mass of about 45 kg each with dimensions of 50 x 50 x 40 cm and will launch along with a relay satellite in May or June this year.

Equipped with low frequency antennae and receivers, the astronomy objectives of DSLWP-A1 and A2 will be to observe the sky at the very low frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum (1MHz-30MHz), corresponding to wavelengths of 300m-10m, with the aim of learning about energetic phenomena from celestial sources.

selvaarchi
2018-Mar-09, 02:13 PM
Change'4 is going through thermal vacuum testing in readiness for its flight later this year.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lander-and-rover-undergoing-thermal-vacuum-tests-ahead-of-lunar-far-side-mission?cat=business


China's Chang'e-4 lunar lander and rover spacecraft are undergoing vacuum testing ahead of their pioneering December mission to touch down on the far side of the Moon.

The thermal vacuum tests are to the last of a range of space environment tests which began in January, and include vibroacoustic, electromagnetic and mechanical vibration tests, before the Chang'e-4 spacecraft can leave the Assembly, Integration and Testing (AIT) Centre.

Thermal vacuum testing simulates the extreme ranges of hot and cold temperatures to be experienced by the spacecraft on its mission.

On the Moon's surface temperatures can reach up to around 120 degrees Celsius during sunlight, and as low as -170 degrees Celsius during the lunar nights.

selvaarchi
2018-Apr-12, 03:03 PM
China is running a competition to name Chang'e 4 relay satellite. The results will be known on China's annual Space Day - April 24th.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-relay-satellite-to-be-named-through-contest-held-by-space-science-centre


A competition has been opened to name the communications relay satellite that will soon launch to facilitate the pioneering Chang'e-4 lunar far side landing mission in late 2018.

The Chang'e-4 relay satellite is a necessary part of a lunar far side landing mission, as that area of the Moon never faces the Earth. The satellite will be be placed at a Lagrange Point beyond the Moon to provide a communications link between the lunar lander and rover and Earth.

The National Space Science Centre (NSSC) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) last month launched (Chinese) the naming contest for the satellite, running from March 27 to April 15.

The winning entry will be announced on China's third annual Space Day, on April 24.

selvaarchi
2018-Apr-13, 03:21 AM
We might have flowers blooming on the moon at the end of the year!!!!:D

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-04/12/c_137106440.htm


China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe is expected to do many things unprecedented in space history after it launches later this year, such as touching down softly on the far side of the Moon and taking the first flowers to blossom on the lifeless lunar surface.

The probe will carry a tin containing seeds of potato and arabidopsis, a small flowering plant related to cabbage and mustard, and probably some silkworm eggs to conduct the first biological experiment on the Moon.

The "lunar mini biosphere" experiment was designed by 28 Chinese universities, led by southwest China' s Chongqing University, a conference on scientific and technological innovation of Chongqing Municipality has heard.

An article in QUARTZ that has a picture of the tin that will contain the silkworm and plants.

https://qz.com/1251821/chinas-pioneers-to-the-far-side-of-the-moon-on-the-change-4-will-be-flowers-and-silkworms/


Almost half a century ago, the first human landed on the moon, marking “a giant leap for mankind.” This year, China is sending seeds of plants and insects there.

Seeds of potatoes and arabidopsis—a small flowering plant belonging to the mustard family—along with silkworm cocoons, will hitch a ride with the Chang’e-4 lander and rover on China’s first probe to the far side of the moon in December. China hopes to create a “mini lunar biosphere” as part of its research for building a lunar base and even the possibility of long-term residence on the moon.

The plants and insects, contained in an 18-cm-tall (7 inches) bucket-like tin with air, water, and soil, will create an ecological system. A tube inside the tin will direct natural light from the moon for photosynthesis, and the plants will then emit oxygen which feeds the silkworms once they hatch. The insects will then create carbon dioxide and waste, which in turn aids the plants’ growth, according to scientists at Chongqing University who are leading the project. The team hopes to live broadcast (link in Chinese) the progress of the organisms.

selvaarchi
2018-Apr-24, 11:51 AM
China has given names to Chang'e-4 relay satellite and the two microsatellites (which will orbit the moon).

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lunar-far-side-satellite-named-magpie-bridge-from-folklore-tale-of-lovers-crossing-the-milky-way


China's Chang'e-4 relay satellite, which will launch next month to facilitate communications with a lander and rover on the lunar far side, has been named Queqiao - or magpie bridge - from a Chinese myth.

The name was announced by the China National Space Administration (CNSA) in Harbin, northeast China, on Tuesday April 24 at an event marking the advent of China's third Space Day.

The name comes the Chinese myth and love story of the Weaver Girl and the Cowherd. Separated by the Silver River, which symbolises the Milky Way, the lovers are reunited for one day each year by a bridge formed by a flock of magpies - Queqiao (鹊桥) - allowing them to cross the heavens.

Two microsatellites, which will accompany the launch in May and be placed in lunar orbit, also received names.

These are Longjiang-1 and Longjiang-2 (龙江一号 and 龙江二号), meaning Dragon River 1 and 2. The developer of the microsatellites is the Harbin Institute of Technology, situated in the capital of Heilongjiang (Black Dragon River) Province. The Heilongjiang river is also known as the Amur.

selvaarchi
2018-May-06, 06:18 PM
China is putting the infrastructure in place to launch the Chang'e-4 relay satellite.

https://gbtimes.com/chinas-yuanwang-7-space-tracking-ship-sailing-to-support-change-4-relay-satellite-launch?cat=business


China's Yuanwang 7 space tracking vessel is heading for waters in the Pacific Ocean ready to support the launch of the relay satellite which will facilitate the Chang'e-4 lunar far side lander and rover mission.

selvaarchi
2018-May-07, 03:24 PM
China is putting the infrastructure in place to launch the Chang'e-4 relay satellite.

https://gbtimes.com/chinas-yuanwang-7-space-tracking-ship-sailing-to-support-change-4-relay-satellite-launch?cat=business

Now Yuanwang 6 space tracking vessel has set sail to also support Chang'e-4 relay satellite launch.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-yuanwang-6-tracking-vessel-prepares-for-moon-relay-satellite-launch?cat=business


The Yuanwang 6 space tracking vessel has left port in preparation to support the launch of the relay satellite required for China's ambitious Chang'e-4 lunar far side landing.

The Queqiao communications relay satellite is scheduled to launch from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre on May 21 or later via a Long March 4C rocket, heading for an orbit beyond the Moon.

Yuanwang 6 will track the spacecraft after launch from southwest China as it heads into orbit, observing its trajectory and providing survey and control capabilities.

selvaarchi
2018-May-16, 12:12 PM
Launch is all set for next week. 21st of May.

http://spacenews.com/china-preparing-to-launch-change-4-relay-satellite-may-21/


China is set to launch a relay satellite to the second Earth-moon Lagrange point May 21, in a necessary precursor to the planned Chang’e-4 soft-landing on the lunar far side late in the year.

Chang’e-4 is the backup to the Chang’e-3 mission which put a lander and rover on Mare Imbrium in late 2013. Following that success, the lunar craft have been repurposed for a pioneering landing on the moon’s far side.

selvaarchi
2018-May-18, 01:14 PM
Aboard the relay satellite will be a Dutch instrument and it will not be pointed at the moon!!!

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Dutch_Radio_Antenna_To_Depart_For_The_Moon_On_Chin ese_Mission_999.html


On 21 May 2018, the Chinese space agency will launch the relay satellite Chang'e 4 to an orbit behind the Moon. On board will be a Dutch radio antenna, the Netherlands Chinese Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE). The radio antenna is the first Dutch-made scientific instrument to be sent on a Chinese space mission, and it will open up a new chapter in radio astronomy.

The is instrument developed and built by engineers from ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy in Dwingeloo, the Radboud Radio Lab of Radboud University in Nijmegen, and the Delft-based company ISIS. With the instrument, astronomers want to measure radio waves originating from the period directly after the Big Bang, when the first stars and galaxies were formed.

Why is it so important for the measuring instruments to be placed behind the Moon? Professor of Astrophysics from Radboud University and ASTRON Heino Falcke: "Radio astronomers study the universe using radio waves, light coming from stars and planets, for example, which are not visible with the naked eye.

"We can receive almost all celestial radio wave frequencies here on Earth. We cannot detect radio waves below 30 MHz, however, as these are blocked by our atmosphere. It is these frequencies in particular that contain information about the early universe, which is why we want to measure them."

selvaarchi
2018-May-20, 03:01 PM
Aboard the relay satellite will be a Dutch instrument and it will not be pointed at the moon!!!

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Dutch_Radio_Antenna_To_Depart_For_The_Moon_On_Chin ese_Mission_999.html

More information on the Dutch instrument from the Science Magazine.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/05/china-s-moon-mission-will-probe-cosmic-dark-ages


On 21 May, China plans to launch a satellite with a vital but unglamorous mission. From a vantage point beyond the moon, Queqiao, as the satellite is called, will relay data from Chang'e 4, a lander and rover that is supposed to touch down on the lunar far side before the end of the year. But a Dutch-made radio receiver aboard Queqiao will attempt something more visionary. In the quiet lunar environment, it will listen to the cosmos at low frequencies that carry clues to the time a few hundred million years after the big bang, when clouds of hydrogen gas were spawning the universe's first stars.

The mission is a proof of principle for other efforts to take radio astronomy above the atmosphere, which blocks key radio frequencies, and far from earthly interference. "Putting the whole show into space is extremely appealing," says Michael Hecht of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Haystack Observatory in Westford, whose team is also developing small radio satellites that could be used to probe the cosmos. For Europe's astronomers, it is also a test of cooperation with China, something their U.S. counterparts at NASA are barred from doing.

The Netherlands-China Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE) project stems from a 2015 Dutch trade mission to China, during which the two countries agreed to collaborate on space missions. The Netherlands is strong in radio astronomy: Its Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) stretches across much of northern Europe. NCLE Principal Investigator Heino Falcke, of Radboud University in the Netherlands, has long advocated a "LOFAR on the moon." China has an ambitious program of moon missions, so he jumped at the chance to take a first step. "We put together a proposal in 2 weeks," he says. Once funded, the team had just 1.5 years to build the instrument. "Half of the experiment is how you work together" Falcke says. Jinsong Ping of the National Astronomical Observatories of China in Beijing, who leads the Chinese team working on the NCLE, agrees: "It is really challenging both sides. … Different culture, habit, language, working manner."

selvaarchi
2018-May-21, 11:31 AM
Queqiao communications relay satellite has been launched. Once it reaches the L2 point in 8 days, it will be put through number of tests to ensure it will be ready for Chang'e 4.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/05/china-has-launched-a-communications-satellite-to-the-moon/


China's space agency has taken a critical first step toward an unprecedented robotic landing on the far side of the Moon. On Monday, local time, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation launched a Long March 4C rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. Although it did not broadcast the launch, the Chinese space agency said it went smoothly, according to the state news service Xinhua.

"The launch is a key step for China to realize its goal of being the first country to send a probe to soft-land on and rove the far side of the Moon," Zhang Lihua, manager of the relay satellite project, told Xinhua.

About 25 minutes after the launch, the Queqiao spacecraft separated from the rocket's upper stage, and began a trip toward a halo orbit of the Earth-Moon Lagrange Point L2. Over the next six months, the 425kg spacecraft will undergo tests to ensure it will function properly as a communications relay.

selvaarchi
2018-May-21, 02:55 PM
An article from The Planetary Society written before the lunch gives more information of the mission.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2018/0519-change-4-relay-satellite.html


China's fourth lunar mission, Chang’e 4, is expected to begin on May 21 with the launch of a Long March 4C rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in the southwest of China. The launch will carry a spacecraft named Queqiao, which will serve as a communication relay satellite between Earth and the lunar farside. The name Queqiao means "magpie bridge" in Chinese and comes from a Chinese folk tale, a love story about a flock of magpies that form a bridge crossing the Milky Way once a year to reunite lovers known as the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl, as well as their children.

selvaarchi
2018-May-21, 03:10 PM
The Chinese paper Xinhua has a short video of the launch and more details of the mission.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-05/21/c_137194788.htm


China launched a relay satellite early Monday to set up a communication link between Earth and the planned Chang'e-4 lunar probe that will explore the Moon's mysterious far side.

The satellite was carried by a Long March-4C rocket that blasted off at 5:28 a.m. from southwest China's Xichang Satellite Launch Center, according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA).

selvaarchi
2018-May-25, 02:53 AM
Queqiao will be passing the moon today.

https://gbtimes.com/queqiao-update-tracking-the-change-4-relay-satellite-on-its-way-to-the-moon


According to data computed by Bill Gray, an independent orbit analyst, Queqiao was close to 333,000 kilometres away from Earth at time of publishing on May 23 (with the average Earth-Moon distance being 384,400 km).

Queqiao is expected to reach and swing-by the Moon on May 25, before heading to its destination, the second Earth-Moon Lagrange point.

Gray told gbtimes that Queqiao will need to perform a manoeuvre to slow its speed as it comes close to the Moon in order to send it towards its intended destination. If not, Queqiao will leave the Moon with as much energy as when it arrived, and go back into orbit around the Earth.

"We now have Queqiao going past the moon at 110 +/- 54 km at 13:41 UT on 25 May. That's based just on tracking it optically, though, with no knowledge of when it might manoeuvre," Gray said.

The expected manoeuvre is the next key moment in the Chang'e-4 mission, which ultimately aims to help operate a lander and rover on the lunar far side.

selvaarchi
2018-May-26, 05:49 PM
Queqiao Chang'e-4 relay satellite has successfully done the breaking as it passed the moon to reach L2.

https://gbtimes.com/queqiao-change-4-satellite-performs-moon-flyby-makes-successful-braking-manoeuvre?cat=chinas-space-program


The Queqiao Chang'e-4 relay satellite has passed the Moon and successfully performed a propulsive manoeuvre to slow itself and send it towards its intended destination beyond the Moon.

The Beijing Aerospace Control Centre (BACC) issued the command at 21:32 Beijing time (13:32 UTC), and by 21:46 confirmed through telemetry that Queqiao had performed the burn and entered a transfer orbit towards the second Earth-Moon Lagrange point, People's Liberation Army Daily reported.

The spacecraft passed the Moon at 100 km above the surface at closest approach. Failure to perform the braking manoeuvre would have seen the spacecraft head back towards the Earth.

selvaarchi
2018-May-28, 03:17 PM
China has lost contact with one of the micro satellites but it will have no effect on the Chang'e mission.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lunar-microsatellite-may-be-lost-queqiao-continues-toward-lagrange-point-beyond-moon?cat=chinas-space-program


Contact has been lost with one of two microsatellites launched along with the Queqiao Chang'e-4 lunar relay satellite following a standard trajectory correction manoeuvre on the way to the Moon.

DSLWP-A and B, also known as Longjiang-1 and -2, piggybacked on the launch of Queqiao, a relay satellite for a planned landing on the lunar far side, on a Long March 4C rocket from Xichang on May 20.

Queqiao passed the Moon at an altitude of 100 km on Friday, successfully performing a braking burn to send it towards its intended destination, the second Earth-Moon Lagrange point, from which it will facilitate communications between the Earth and a lander and rover to be sent to the far side of the Moon.

The Discovering the Sky at Longest Wavelengths Pathfinder (DSLWP) satellites were intended to execute burns to place them in an elliptical (200 x 9,000 km) orbit around the Moon, where they would carry out astronomy and amateur radio tests.

While DSLWP-B/Longjiang-2 successfully entered lunar orbit, there has been apparently no communication between the ground and Longjiang-1 following a trajectory correction manoeuvre after trans-lunar injection.

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-01, 11:38 AM
Some updates on the Queqiao mission. Do not expect any official update from the Chinese government till mid month when the Queqiao satellite will have settled in its L2 orbit.

https://gbtimes.com/queqiao-update-change-4-lunar-relay-satellite-establishing-halo-orbit-after-approaching-lagrange-point?cat=chinas-space-program


It has been a week since the Queqiao Chang'e-4 lunar relay satellite made its lunar swing-by, sending it on a transfer trajectory towards the second Earth-Moon Lagrange Point (EML2). There have been no official updates from China, so where is the spacecraft now?

Having launched late on May 20 UTC, Queqiao made its lunar swing-by on May 25, performing a braking burn at 13:32 UTC to send the communications satellite towards EML2, some 60-80,000 km beyond the Moon.

EML2 is one of five libration points in the Earth-Moon system that allow a much smaller third body to orbit while maintaining its position relative to the larger two, making it a perfect place for Queqiao to perform its main objective.

Queqiao should have approached the EML2 point by May 29 after two orbital corrections, but no updates have come from China. This has brought confusion, but making the distinction between reaching EML2 and establishing the desired orbit around it helps bring clarity.

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-04, 11:06 AM
Spaceflightnow carries information on Queqiao and Chang'e 4.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/06/03/chinese-data-relay-satellite-taking-up-post-over-far-side-of-the-moon/


A Chinese communications satellite carrying a Dutch radio astronomy instrument launched last month is expected to maneuver into position around a gravitationally-stable point beyond the moon in the coming days, ready to relay telemetry and data between Earth and the Chang’e 4 lander set to attempt the first landing on lunar far side late this year.

Launched at 2128 GMT (5:28 p.m. EDT) May 20 from China’s Xinhua space center aboard a Long March 4C rocket, the relay probe completed an engine firing as it flew around 60 miles (100 kilometers) from the moon May 25, setting a course for a perch around 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) from Earth.

The relay craft is named Queqiao, which means “magpie bridge” and comes from a Chinese folk tale in which a flock of birds form a bridge across the galaxy to reunite two lovers.

Queqiao will park itself in a “halo” orbit around the Earth-moon L2 Lagrange point around 37,000 miles (60,000 kilometers) beyond the moon. At that location, the combined effect from gravity from Earth and the moon will keep Queqiao at roughly the same distance as the moon completes each 28-day orbit.

China developed the Queqiao spacecraft, which weighed roughly 900 pounds (400 kilograms) fully fueled for launch, to link ground controllers and scientists with the Chang’e 4 lander and rover, the country’s next robotic mission to the moon.

BigDon
2018-Jun-04, 07:23 PM
Is this going to be a rover mission?

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-05, 02:47 AM
Is this going to be a rover mission?

Yes to be launched towards the end of the year.

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-14, 03:47 PM
spacenews confirme Queqiao has entered its intended orbit around L2. Also one of the micro satellites has been successfully put into luna orbit but the other one has been lost.

http://spacenews.com/change-4-relay-satellite-enters-halo-orbit-around-earth-moon-l2-microsatellite-in-lunar-orbit/


The relay satellite which will facilitate China’s Chang’e-4 lunar far side landing mission late in 2018 has entered its intended halo orbit around Earth-Moon Lagrange point 2.

The Beijing Aerospace Command and Control Center (BACC) sent commands for the spacecraft to fire its engines at 11:00 p.m. EDT June 13, with the burn complete at 11:06 p.m.

The satellite will now undergo on-orbit testing of its communications functions, while maintaining a complex Lissajous orbit, which is a three-dimensional irregular curve, rather than a two-dimensional halo.

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-15, 01:40 PM
China and Saudi Arabia jointly released photos of the moon.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-06/14/c_137253874.htm


China and Saudi Arabia on Thursday jointly unveiled three lunar images acquired through cooperation on the relay satellite mission for Chang'e-4 lunar probe.

This is an important cooperation achievement between China and Saudi Arabia in the relay satellite mission, the China National Space Administration said in a statement.

selvaarchi
2018-Jun-16, 11:20 AM
"How China's lunar relay satellite arrived in its final orbit".

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2018/20180615-queqiao-orbit-explainer.html


After a 24-day journey, Queqiao, the relay satellite for China's Chang'e 4 lunar mission, successfully entered its Earth-Moon L2 halo orbit. A normal mission to lunar orbit usually takes four or five days, but Queqiao took much longer due to its special orbit. Here's a guide to the spacecraft's long and complicated journey.

selvaarchi
2018-Aug-16, 12:30 PM
China just released photos of Chang'e 4 rover

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-08/15/c_137393174.htm

"China's moon lander and rover for the Chang'e-4 lunar probe, which is expected to land on the far side of the moon this year, was unveiled Wednesday.

Images displayed at Wednesday's press conference showed the rover was a rectangular box with two foldable solar panels and six wheels. It is 1.5 meters long, 1 meter wide and 1.1 meters high."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2018-Aug-17, 10:30 AM
Chang'e 4 all set for December launch.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/change4-launch-announced.html


China is all set to attempt the first ever soft-landing on the far side of the Moon, announcing on Wednesday that it will launch the Chang’e-4 lunar lander and rover spacecraft in December.

Renders of the lander and rover were unveiled at a press conference in Beijing, along with a contest (Chinese) to name what will be China’s second lunar rover, and a video preview of the mission.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-04, 03:12 PM
"A tiny Chinese satellite is orbiting the Moon and allowing radio amateurs to download images"

https://gbtimes.com/a-tiny-chinese-satellite-is-orbiting-the-moon-and-allowing-radio-amateurs-download-images


China's Chang'e-4 lander and rover are scheduled to launch in December this year to perform the first ever soft-landing on the far side of the Moon, but the mission's side quests are already performing impressive feats.

One of two microsatellites launched along with a required communications relay satellite in May has quietly been allowing radio operators to download images from the spacecraft taken along its elliptical lunar orbit.

Longjiang-2, aka DSLWP-B, was developed by students at the Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) in Heilongjiang Province, northeast China. Despite having a mass of just 47 kg, the tiny satellite managed to use its own propulsion to slow down and enter lunar orbit while the relay satellite continued past the Moon to its special destination.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-22, 12:34 PM
The naming of the rover being carried by Chang'e 4 has been narrowed down to 10 candidates. The Chinese public will have till October 10 to vote for their name on the list.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-shortlist-of-10-names-revealed-for-chinas-lunar-far-side-rover


A shortlist of ten names has been revealed for the Chang'e-4 lunar far side rover following a public call and contest to solicit names for the pioneering Moon mission.

selvaarchi
2018-Oct-08, 03:46 PM
"Pre-launch tests at Xichang, rover upgraded, launch and landing predictions"

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-pre-launch-tests-at-xichang-rover-upgraded-launch-and-landing-predictions


Preparations for the first-ever attempt at a soft landing on the far side of the Moon are progressing at Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in southwestern China.

Teams are understood to be in Xichang performing pre-launch tests on the Chang'e-4 lander and rover ahead of the mission in December, according to a top scientist with the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST).

selvaarchi
2018-Oct-10, 11:42 AM
"A tiny Chinese satellite is orbiting the Moon and allowing radio amateurs to download images"

Radio enthusiasts who have been following this mission were rewarded with images captured by the tiny satellite.

https://gbtimes.com/radio-enthusiasts-receive-new-earth-and-moon-images-from-chinese-microsatellite-in-lunar-orbit


Radio enthusiasts managed to connect with and download images captured by a tiny satellite in lunar orbit over the weekend and were rewarded with images of the Moon and Earth.

The latest UHF tests saw data transmitted by Longjiang-2 and received and decoded by radio operators on Earth on October 7 and 8.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-02, 07:14 AM
We are days away from the launch of Chang'e 4 and already articles on it are being released. Here is one from "Nature".

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07562-z


Early in the New Year, if all goes well, the Chinese spacecraft Chang’e-4 will arrive where no craft has been before: the far side of the Moon. The mission is scheduled to launch from Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in Sichuan province on 8 December. The craft, comprising a lander and a rover, will then enter the Moon’s orbit, before touching down on the surface.

If the landing is successful, the mission’s main job will be to investigate this side of the lunar surface, which is peppered with many small craters. The lander will also conduct the first radio astronomy experiments from the far side of the Moon — and the first investigations to see whether plants will grow in the low-gravity lunar environment.

Superluminal
2018-Dec-03, 08:48 AM
We are days away from the launch of Chang'e 4 and already articles on it are being released. Here is one from "Nature".

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07562-z
Not exactly the first to reach the far side. Ranger 4, with its beeping seismograph encased in balsa wood, was tracked to an impact on the far side at 15.5s 130.7w, on April 26, 1962.

IceLizard
2018-Dec-05, 12:25 PM
China to launch Chang'e-4 lunar far side landing mission on December 7 (~18:20 UTC/13:20 ET on Friday; 02:20 Beijing time Saturday).

https://gbtimes.com/china-to-launch-change-4-lunar-far-side-landing-mission-on-december-7

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-05, 01:18 PM
Confirmed - launch is on December 7th.

https://gbtimes.com/china-to-launch-change-4-lunar-far-side-landing-mission-on-december-7


China will launch its Chang'e-4 lunar mission on December 7 universal time which will see a lander and rover spacecraft make the first ever attempt to land on the far side of the Moon.

According to airspace closure notices issued on Wednesday, the launch will take place between 18:15-18:34 universal time (13:15-13:34 Eastern) on Friday (02:15-02:34 Beijing time Saturday).

The Chang'e-4 lander and rover will launch atop an enhanced Long March 3B carrier rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in southwest China.

There is currently no indication that the launch will be broadcast live, in which case the first official news after liftoff may only be provided once the spacecraft have successfully entered lunar transfer orbit.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-08, 12:13 AM
:rimshot:It is on the way to the moon :clap::clap::clap:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/12/07/china-launches-historic-mission-to-land-on-far-side-of-the-moon/


A robotic lander and rover lifted off Friday (U.S. time) from China’s Xichang space center, kicking off a journey through space that will culminate in an attempt in early January to touch down on the far side of the moon for the first time.

The Chang’e 4 mission — the fourth in China’s main line of lunar explorers — lifted off at around 1823 GMT (1:23 p.m. EST) Friday from Xichang, an inland spaceport nestled between hills in southwestern China’s Sichuan province.

Chang’e 4 climbed into the night sky at Xichang — liftoff occurred at 2:23 a.m. Beijing time Saturday — toward the east affixed to the top of a Long March 3B rocket.

Chinese state television did not broadcast the launch live, as it did for China’s previous lunar mission launch in 2013, but spectators near Xichang streamed live video of the middle-of-the-night blastoff online without commentary. The video showed the Long March 3B disappearing into the night sky a few minutes after an apparently smooth liftoff from Xichang.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-08, 12:29 PM
Emily Lakdawalla on the lift off and how to follow on the progress of Chang'e 4 on Twitter (by Planetary Society staff).

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2018/liftoff-for-change-4.html


The spacecraft has now performed its trans-lunar injection rocket burn, aiming toward the Moon. According to Quanzhi Ye, there are rocket maneuvers planned for 8, 9, and 10 December (UTC), and orbit insertion is planned for about 15:00 on 11 December.

It will be 26 days until the spacecraft lands on the lunar farside, on or about 3 January. We'll post further news as we get it! In the meantime, follow me, Andrew Jones, and Jonathan McDowell on Twitter, and read our Planetary Report article about Chang'e-4 by mission scientist Long Xiao.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-10, 12:50 AM
A 2 and a half minute video on the preparations for the Chang'e 4 mission (it is in Mandarin). It includes a bit of information I was not aware of before. Chang'e 4 can operate at night!

http://www.cctvplus.com/archive/20181208/8097714.shtml#!language=1


"There are some differences between Chang'e-3 and Chang'e-4. The Chang'e-3 landed on the moon following a parabolic path, but our Chang'e-4 will primary land vertically," said Sun.

With no access to the solar energy, the Chang'e-3 probe was totally power off in the nights on the moon, and all electronic equipment stopped work. But Chang'e-4 is equipped with a heating supply system, aimed to power the equipment.

"Based on the supply of heat energy, we also try to use thermoelectric effect to generate power for the electronic equipment," said Sun.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-10, 12:53 AM
China has done the second orbital correction.

http://www.cctvplus.com/archive/20181209/8097814.shtml#!language=1


The second orbit trimming for China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe was completed on Sunday afternoon at Kashgar Observation and Control Station in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

CJSF
2018-Dec-10, 05:38 PM
How do the lander and rover plan to communicate with Earth? Is there a relay satellite already in orbit?

CJSF

7cscb
2018-Dec-10, 07:30 PM
How do the lander and rover plan to communicate with Earth? Is there a relay satellite already in orbit?

CJSF

Yup, relay satellite is at the far side Lagrange point, L2.

CJSF
2018-Dec-10, 07:41 PM
I must have missed when that launched. Cool!

CJSF

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-10, 11:56 PM
It was reported here (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?160241-China-s-Chang-e-4-mission&p=2449846#post2449846) in post#30.

CJSF
2018-Dec-11, 12:49 PM
It was reported here (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?160241-China-s-Chang-e-4-mission&p=2449846#post2449846) in post#30.

Yep! Sure enough was. In May. Thanks. My spring sort of got away from me this year (actually, the whole year has).

CJSF

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-12, 01:58 PM
Chang'e 4 has entered lunar orbit successfully.:rimshot::clap: . Now the hard part comes in three weeks - land on the moon. Before that, confirm location location is okay before landing.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201812/12/WS5c10de43a310eff303290a97.html


China's Chang'e 4 robotic probe has approached the moon and entered a lunar orbit, marking a major step in its journey toward the moon's far side.

The China National Space Administration said in a statement on Wednesday evening that Chang'e 4 entered an elliptical lunar orbit at least 100 kilometers above the moon's surface at 4:45 pm Wednesday after nearly 110 hours of flight since its liftoff on early Saturday. It noted that the maneuver is a key step to ensure Chang'e 4's soft-landing on the moon.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-13, 01:44 AM
The Planetary Society on Chang'e 4 successful lunar orbit insertion. It also covers the possible reasons why it will take three weeks before the landing is attempted.

One interesting tit bit in the article - Chang'e-5 T1 is still working.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2018/change-4-lunar-orbit.html


China’s Chang’e-4 lunar mission, the first-ever soft-landing endeavor on the lunar farside, launched successfully on 8 December at 02:23 Beijing time (7 December at 18:23 UTC) via a Long March 3B rocket from Xichang Satellite Launch Center. The launch carried a lander and a rover toward the Moon. On 12 December at 8:45 Beijing time (16:45 UTC), the spacecraft arrived in lunar orbit, preparing for a landing in early January.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-21, 02:51 AM
Chang'e 4 and Queqiao relay satellite are communicating with each other.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lander-makes-contact-with-queqiao-relay-satellite-from-lunar-orbit


The Chang'e-4 spacecraft has made contact with the Queqiao relay satellite orbiting beyond the Moon, according to the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST), which made the spacecraft.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-30, 07:35 PM
Chang'e 4 has lowered its orbit, in preparation to land on the moon.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lowers-orbit-ready-for-first-ever-landing-on-far-side-of-the-moon?cat=chinas-space-program


The Chang'e-4 lunar spacecraft lowered its orbit early on Sunday in preparation to attempt the first-ever landing on the far side of the Moon in the first days of the New Year.

An official release by the China Lunar Exploration Project (CLEP) under the China National Space Administration (CNSA) on Sunday stated that the Beijing Aerospace Command and Control Centre (BACC) issued instructions to Chang'e-4, which then fired its at 00:54 UTC (08:54 Beijing time).

Telemetry received by ground stations monitoring the mission confirmed by 00:56 UTC that Chang'e-4 had lowered its orbit from a circular 100 x 100 kilometre orbit to an elliptical 15 x 100 km orbit.

CNSA stated said the control centre will choose a proper time to land the probe on the far side of the moon, with the landing expected to target a section of the Von Kármán crater.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-31, 02:23 PM
With only 4 days to go before China's historic attempt to land on the far side of the moon, QUARTZ has an article covering the challenges.

https://qz.com/1508830/chinas-change-4-is-in-position-for-the-first-ever-landing-on-the-moons-far-side/


A little more than a decade ago, China began its lunar exploration by sending a spacecraft named after an ancient lunar goddess to the Moon. Thanks to the Chang’e-1 spacecraft, China became the world’s third country to have its own Moon maps, after the former Soviet Union and the US.

This week, China’s latest Moon exploration mission is expected to make history for human space exploration—by landing a spacecraft on the far side of the Moon for the first time ever. China’s Chang’e-4 lander and rover took off early on Dec. 8 local time, and is expected to touch down any day now. Over the weekend, China’s space agency said the rover was in position for landing, just 15 kilometers (9 miles) away from the lunar surface, but didn’t specify exactly when it would happen.

selvaarchi
2018-Dec-31, 04:47 PM
"How the Chang'e-4 spacecraft will land on the far side of the Moon"

https://gbtimes.com/how-the-change-4-spacecraft-will-land-on-the-far-side-of-the-moon


China's Chang'e-4 spacecraft is in lunar orbit and preparing to attempt the first-ever landing on the far side of the Moon in the first days of January. Here's how the landing will proceed.

The Chang'e-4 spacecraft lifted off from Xichang, southwest China, on December 7 universal time and enter lunar orbit on December 12, where it tested communications with the Queqiao relay satellite and refined its orbit.

Chang'e-4 is currently in a 15 x 100 kilometre elliptical polar orbit ready for a landing at Von Kármán crater early in the New Year, according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA).

According to amateur spacecraft trackers, this orbit should take the spacecraft over the Von Kármán crater for a possible landing around January 2 or 3, which comes a few days after sunrise over the area to allow the mainly solar-powered lander and rover spacecraft to begin operations on the surface immediately.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-02, 02:00 PM
It is now confirmed, Chang'e 4 will land sometime tomorrow or day after tomorrow (3rd and 4th).

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201901/01/WS5c2b4dcaa310d91214051ea0.html


Mankind's first explorer on the moon's far side soon will land on its destination, according to a schedule published by its developer.

The Chang'e 4 robotic probe is expected to land on the South Pole–Aitken basin on the silver sphere's far side sometime between Wednesday and Thursday, according to information from China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp, a major contractor of the country's lunar exploration programs.

7cscb
2019-Jan-02, 07:37 PM
It is now confirmed, Chang'e 4 will land sometime tomorrow or day after tomorrow (3rd and 4th).

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201901/01/WS5c2b4dcaa310d91214051ea0.html

huh? I thought it was supposed to be on the 7th.

Will there be live coverage?

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-02, 11:17 PM
huh? I thought it was supposed to be on the 7th.

Will there be live coverage?

No mention of live coverage so far.

Superluminal
2019-Jan-03, 05:54 AM
They did it! Congratulations China.
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/change4-success.html
Chang'e Su is on the Moon!!!

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-03, 07:17 AM
They did it! Congratulations China.
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/change4-success.html
Chang'e Su is on the Moon!!!

Ya congratulations China :clap:.

Here is a report from the Chinese press with the first photo from Chang'e 4.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/03/c_137716998.htm


China's Chang'e-4 probe touched down on the far side of the moon Thursday, becoming the first spacecraft soft-landing on the moon's uncharted side that is never visible from Earth.

The probe comprised of a lander and a rover, touched down at the preselected landing area at 177.6 degrees east longitude and 45.5 degrees south latitude on the far side of the moon at 10:26 a.m. (Beijing Time), the China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced.

With the communication assistance of the relay satellite Queqiao, meaning Magpie Bridge, the probe sent back the first-ever close-up photograph of the moon's far side, opening a new chapter in lunar exploration.

The landing process took 12 minutes.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/03/c_137717022.htm


Over about 12 dramatic minutes, China's Chang'e-4 probe descended and softly touched down on a crater on the far side of the moon on Thursday.

Wu Weiren, chief designer of China's lunar exploration program, said Chang'e-3 landed on the Sinus Iridum, or the Bay of Rainbows, on the moon's near side, which is as flat as the north China plain, while the landing site of Chang'e-4 is as rugged as the high mountains and lofty hills of southwest China's Sichuan Province.

Chinese space experts chose the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin as the landing site of Chang'e-4. The area available for the landing is only one eighth of that for Chang'e-3, and is surrounded by mountains as high as 10 km.

Unlike the parabolic curve of Chang'e-3's descent trajectory, Chang'e-4 made an almost vertical landing, said Wu.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-03, 08:13 AM
Going by the report from CNN, the rover will roll out about 6 hours from touch down. That is about now.

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/02/health/china-lunar-rover-far-moon-landing-intl/index.html


State media reported the rover transmitted back the world's first close range image of the far side of the moon. Six hours after touchdown, the rover will descend from the lander onto the moon's surface, mission spokesman Yu Guobin told CCTV.

bknight
2019-Jan-03, 12:56 PM
Congratulations to the China Space Agency for a landing.

George
2019-Jan-03, 02:35 PM
:clap: Another first for humanity! But why am I hearing Kryptonite in my head. :) There were several mentions of this landing including some animation on the top morning show with one host ending with the statement it is just like the other side of the Moon only darker, though no hint that this was a poetic note. Oh well. :)


Here (https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2010/pdf/1857.pdf) is a 2010 paper noting that this location is within the SPA (South Pole-Aitken) basin, which may be the largest impact site (~ 2500 km dia.).

BetaDust
2019-Jan-03, 10:20 PM
23891

Wheels on the ground!

Yuto 2 is roving!

-- Dennis

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-04, 12:09 AM
23891

Wheels on the ground!

Yuto 2 is roving!

-- Dennis

:clap::clap::clap: well done China :clap::clap::clap: The rover is called Yutu-2


China has chosen the name "Yutu-2", or Jade Rabbit-2, for its new #moon rover. The rover left the first ever "footprint" from a human spacecraft on the far side of the moon late at night on Thursday, after it separated from the lander smoothly.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-04, 01:04 AM
Here is the 1st report I have come across, on Chang'e 4 and Yutu-2.

https://www.space.com/42890-china-moon-far-side-rover-yutu-2-success.html


The lunar far side now has its first set of rover tracks.
Last night (Jan. 2), China's robotic Chang'e 4 lander-rover duo pulled off the first-ever soft touchdown on the moon's largely unexplored far side. And today (Jan. 3), the rover rolled onto the gray dirt floor of the 115-mile-wide (186 kilometers) Von Kármán Crater, creeping down twin ramps from a previous position atop the stationary lander.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-04, 04:06 AM
Watch a six minute video about the moon and Chang'e 4.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/03/c_137717597.htm


No wind blows and no rain falls there. Only crashing meteorites occasionally disrupt the stillness. The desolate landscape on the far side of the moon - never visible from Earth - has waited billions of years to see the first-ever soft landing of a visitor from Earth.

After orbiting the moon for more than 20 days, the Chang'e-4 probe, launched from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China on Dec. 8, 2018, has seen countless craters, mountains and valleys on the moon.

Finally, its destination on the far side, the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin, the largest, deepest and oldest crater in the solar system, was illuminated by the rising sun.

The developers of Chang'e-4 decided on Thursday it was the time to come down on this barren world.

At 10:15 a.m., a variable thrust engine was ignited with the assistance of the relay satellite Queqiao (Magpie Bridge), operating in the halo orbit around the second Lagrangian (L2) point of the Earth-moon system, about 65,000 km from the moon, where it can see both Earth and the moon's far side.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-04, 04:58 PM
3 more articles on China's mission to the moon. Two from China and one from The Christian Monitor.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/04/c_137719617.htm


China's second lunar rover has driven on the far side of the moon, which is expected to bring more scientific discoveries from the alien world.

The new rover, named Yutu-2, or literally Jade Rabbit-2, separated from the lander and descended on the lunar surface Thursday night, leaving the first "footprints" on the loose lunar soil, which will be seen for thousands of years as the moon has no wind or rain.

Although the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe looks similar to its predecessor Yutu of the Chang'e-3 probe, Chinese space engineers have made it lighter, smarter, stronger and more reliable.

http://en.people.cn/n3/2019/0104/c90000-9534850.html


China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe has made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon. Experts believe that this successful landing has opened a new chapter in mankind's lunar exploration.

A lander, rover and relay satellite named Queqiao jointly completed the landing, and now serve to communicate between the moon and Earth, said Sun Zezhou, chief designer of the Chang'e-4 probe, from the China Academy of Space Technology.

The mission has conquered at least three difficulties so far. The first was to position the Queqiao relay satellite at the second Lagrangian (L2) point of the Earth-moon system, about 79,000 km from the moon and 40,000 km from Earth, where it can see both Earth and the moon's far side.

The second, Sun said, was to guarantee the accuracy and reliability of the relay satellite for moon-Earth communication and to access the probe's control system.

The third was the safe landing of the probe in the designated area, which has many geological features, said Wu Weiren, the chief designer of China's lunar probe program. To land safely, the probe had to choose a flat area at a big collision site on the far side of the moon.

https://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2019/0103/To-the-moon-and-beyond-Why-China-is-aiming-for-the-stars


It’s never been done before, even by space-faring nations with decades of experience. But on Thursday, China became the first to land a spacecraft on the far side of the moon.

The Chang’e 4 spacecraft trip is just the latest of China’s space missions. The nation’s burgeoning space program has already sent astronauts into space atop their own rockets, sent several probes to the moon, and has outlined plans for much more.

“China is now a major player in the first rank of space powers, and that’s going to be the reality for decades to come,” says Michael Neufeld, senior curator in the Space History Department at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-05, 09:04 AM
There is high expectation, the the Chang'e 4 mission will produce scientific breakthrough findings on the lunar far side.

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Scientists_expect_breakthrough_findings_on_lunar_f ar_side_999.html


China's Chang'e-4 probe has landed on the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin on the far side of the moon, regarded as a virgin territory by scientists expecting important discoveries.

"The far side of the moon has very unique features, and has never been explored in situ, so Chang'e-4 might bring us breakthrough findings," said Zou Yongliao, director of the lunar and deep space exploration division of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

As a result of the tidal locking effect, the moon's revolution cycle is the same as its rotation cycle. It always faces the earth with the same side, and the far side was a mystery before the age of spacecraft.

About 60 years ago, the Luna 3 probe of the Soviet Union sent back the first image of the moon's far side. And about 50 years ago, three astronauts of the United States Apollo 8 mission became the first people to see the moon's far side with their own eyes.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-05, 06:17 PM
Yutu-2 has started work:clap:

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/04/c_137720230.htm


Lunar rover Yutu-2 has been driving on the far side of the moon after separating from the lander and scientific devices on both the lander and rover are currently gathering data, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) said late Friday.

At 17:00 local time in Beijing, the three 5-meter antennas of the low-frequency radio spectrometer on the lander have fully spread out, said the CNSA in a statement.

Meanwhile, Germany's lunar neutron and radiation detector was turned on for testing. The ground control has been receiving geographic and geomorphic images of the moon's far side.

Hop_David
2019-Jan-06, 05:13 PM
Chang'e 4 is an awesome mission. Is Selvaarchi the only person in this forum that's interested in this effort?

profloater
2019-Jan-06, 05:36 PM
Chang'e 4 is an awesome mission. Is Selvaarchi the only person in this forum that's interested in this effort?

no:)

schlaugh
2019-Jan-06, 06:43 PM
Chang'e 4 is an awesome mission. Is Selvaarchi the only person in this forum that's interested in this effort?
No, but he's channeling the information rather well. :)

Speaking for myself, I'm happy to read those reports without comment. And I'm looking forward to the results that the rover can produce.

One small nit; IMO the CNSA does itself a disservice by only providing its web pages in Chinese; if there's an English-language site I'd be happy to read it. Google translate is OK but the site formatting gets weird and the translation is sometimes awkward.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-07, 01:01 AM
Relay satellite Queqiao is more then a communication channel between Chang'e 4 and earth.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/06/c_137723875.htm


"We will let Queqiao work as long as possible. It could also provide communication for probes from other countries if they intend to explore the moon's far side within the lifetime of the satellite," said Ye Peijian, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a senior space expert.

"And that will be a Chinese contribution made to the world," Ye said.

The relay satellite will also be used for scientific and technological experiments.

It has a low-frequency radio spectrometer, jointly developed by Dutch and Chinese scientists, to help astronomers "listen" to the deeper reaches of the cosmos.

It also carries a reflector developed by the Sun Yat-sen University, in south China's Guangdong Province, to conduct the world's longest laser-ranging test between the satellite and an observatory on the ground.

Researchers hope to use the cameras on the satellite to capture asteroids hitting the far side of the moon, said Sun Ji.

"It's extremely difficult, but we hope to try," Sun said.

7cscb
2019-Jan-07, 09:55 PM
Chang'e 4 is an awesome mission. Is Selvaarchi the only person in this forum that's interested in this effort?

Hi Hop_David,

I follow the mission a bit on another site. I think it is a challenging test. They seem to be doing well.

The media access and coverage for this mission is poor. News is often a few hours old. It's a little more difficult to follow and get all enthused.

YMMV

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-08, 12:16 AM
It is seasita time for Yutu-2 (to protect itself from temperatures reaching toward 200 degrees Celsius). it will wake up on January 10th.

https://spacenews.com/chinas-lunar-rover-enters-standby-mode-for-noon-nap-as-change-4-tests-continue/


China’s Chang’e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover have tested out payloads and systems on the far side of the moon, with the rover now taking a ‘noon nap’ as a precaution against high temperatures.

The Chang’e-4 lander made its historic landing at 177.6 degrees east longitude and 45.5 degrees south within Von Kármán crater within the South Pole-Aitken basin at 9:26 p.m. Eastern Jan. 2, following two weeks in lunar orbit.

The rover was deployed from the lander just under 12 hours later, at 9:22 a.m. Eastern Jan. 3. The rover also officially received the name Yutu-2 (‘Jade Rabbit-2’), following on from China’s first lunar rover for the 2013 Chang’e-3 mission.

Monitoring cameras on the lander imaged the rover wheels during deployment and the craft on the surface, with the images returned to Earth via the Queqiao relay satellite stationed in a halo orbit around the second Earth-moon Lagrange point.

After reaching a predetermined point, the Yutu-2 rover has entered a standby mode to protect itself from temperatures reaching toward 200 degrees Celsius the China Lunar Exploration Program under the China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced.

As well as the 3 pictures of Yutu-2 released to date.

https://futurism.com/china-lunar-rover-change-4-far-side-moon-photos


The pictures, taken by Chang’e-4’s on-board cameras, show the Yutu 2 rover— China revealed that name yesterday — rolling down tracks and leaving the Chang’e-4 lander behind.

The rover is situated in the floor of the 115 mile wide (186 kilometers) Von Kármán Crater near the Moon’s South Pole.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-08, 04:43 AM
About one minute forty eight seconds into the video, you will be able to see Yutu-2 leave the lander.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciXXj0Tj7zk


China’s Chang'e-4 lunar mission (lander and rover) landed in the Von Karman Crater, located in the Aitken Basin, in the South Pole region on the far side of the Moon, on 3 January 2019, at 02:26 UTC (10:26 Beijing time). The Chang’e-4 lunar mission was launched by a Long March-3B rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, Sichuan Province, southwest China, on 7 December 2018, at 18:23 UTC (8 December at 02:23 local time).

Credit: China Central Television (CCTV)/China National Space Administration (CNSA)
Music: Moonlight Sonata by Beethoven courtesy of YouTube Audio Library
#Change4

schlaugh
2019-Jan-08, 08:25 PM
About one minute forty eight seconds into the video, you will be able to see Yutu-2 leave the lander.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciXXj0Tj7zk

Uh....selv? You know that’s animation, right? [emoji1]

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-09, 12:22 AM
Uh....selv? You know that’s animation, right? [emoji1]

You are correct. It was published on the of 2nd January:doh:

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-09, 12:11 PM
Ex-astronaut Dr. Leroy Chiao, on "What China's moon landing means for US".

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/07/opinions/china-moon-landing-outpace-us-opinion-chiao/index.html


China started out the year by doing something that no nation has done before: It landed a spacecraft and an accompanying rover on the far side of the moon with an ambitious scientific payload package and an exciting mission ahead to study the interior structure of the moon with the help of ground-penetrating radar, among other things.

Almost equally impressive from a technical standpoint, China successfully placed a communication relay satellite into a lunar halo orbit to enable the command of, and communication with, both the spacecraft and rover, which do not have line-of-sight views of Earth for direct radio contact.

I had mixed feelings about these events.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-10, 12:48 AM
"Why the Moon's far side looks red in new images".

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2019/change-4-red-images.html


The first ever images taken from the surface of the far side of the moon have been released following the Chinese National Space Administration’s (CNSA) successful landing there. The lander Chang'e 4 and rover Yutu 2 follow from Chang'e 3 and the original Yutu rover that were deployed on the moon’s near side in 2013.

But if you’ve been looking closely at the pictures, you could be forgiven for thinking that the far side of the moon is red. That’s how it looks on the unprocessed pictures – and it’s different from other pictures of the moon, in which it appears grey. So what is going on?

Cameras on spacecraft often don’t see colours in the same way as the human eye. For example, the red, green and blue components are usually recorded separately. This was the case with the latest images, and no colour correction has been applied to take account of the different sensitivities of each set of the camera’s colour detectors.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-10, 03:23 PM
The International payloads carried by Chang'e-4 have started operation. The interesting tit bit in the report to me, was that NASA and CNSA are cooperating on this mission:whistle:

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/10/c_137734090.htm


NASA of the United States has also discussed cooperation in lunar and deep space explorations with CNSA. The two sides has collaborated on the study of the landing of the probe.

NASA has offered the orbital data of its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and the Chinese side has provided the landing timing and location, it said.

Roger E. Moore
2019-Jan-10, 03:26 PM
My thinking is that part of Jade Rabbit's mission is to find water ice, at which point China's man-on-the-moon program goes into high gear. IMHO.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-10, 03:33 PM
My thinking is that part of Jade Rabbit's mission is to find water ice, at which point China's man-on-the-moon program goes into high gear. IMHO.

We might have hints of that soon, as Yutu-2 has woken up from its siesta:)

http://www.spacedaily.com/afp/190110121603.0lom8ses.html


China's lunar rover got back to work on the far side of the moon Thursday after waking from a five-day hibernation, its official social media page announced.
"Afternoon nap is over, waking up and getting moving," the Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2) posted on the Twitter-like Weibo.

The rover on Saturday went into standby mode to protect itself from temperatures reaching towards 200 degrees Celsius (390 degrees Fahrenheit), the China Lunar Exploration Program under the China National Space Administration (CNSA) said.

The 140-kilogram (308-pound) rover has since resumed activities, which will include taking a picture of the front side of the lander and exploration missions.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-11, 10:02 AM
China has released 2 more pictures, taken after Yutu-2 woke up from its siesta.

https://qz.com/1520927/chinas-change-4-lander-just-took-a-panoramic-shot-of-moons-far-side/


Today (Jan. 11), the Chinese Lunar Exploration Project (CLEP) office released two pictures on social network Weibo (link in Chinese) of the far side of the Moon, one a panoramic shot, the other a top-down projection of the same area. The picture was taken by the Chang’e-4 spacecraft, which consists of a lander and a rover named Yutu-2, which is equipped with tools like a lunar-penetrating radar to explore the Moon’s material composition. In the picture, the Chang’e-4 lander is behind the Yutu rover.

The 360-degree panorama above was pieced together from 80 photos.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/11/c_137736587.htm


One of the published images is a 360-degree panorama which was pieced together from 80 photos taken by a camera on the lander after the rover drove onto the lunar surface, according to Li Chunlai, deputy director of the National Astronomical Observatories of China and commander-in-chief of the ground application system of Chang'e-4.

The next picture shows how far Yutu-2 has travelled to date.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/11/c_137736620.htm


The screen at the Beijing Aerospace Control Center shows the Chang'e-4 lander (R) and the Yutu-2 rover taking pictures for each other, Jan. 11, 2019.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-12, 12:34 AM
See a two minutes forty seconds video of Chang'e-4 landing.

https://gbtimes.com/heres-the-amazing-footage-of-the-change-4-landing-on-the-far-side-of-the-moon


China has released amazing footage of the descent of the Chang'e-4 spacecraft which shows the historic moment of the first landing on the far side of the Moon.

The Chang'e-4 spacecraft touched down on the far side of the Moon, which never faces the Earth, at 02:26 UTC on January 3, deploying the Yutu-2 rover 12 hours later, but this is the first full footage we've seen of the landing.

The footage comes from the descent camera which initially gives a view ahead of Chang'e-4 over the 186-km-diameter Von Kármán crater, which contains the preselected landing site.

The video shows how, as the craft descends, it is extremely difficult to visually gain any sense of distance to the surface before the landing.


Andrew Jones on the 1st photos returned from Chang'e-4.

https://gbtimes.com/first-lunar-far-side-panoramas-returned-from-change-4-lander


The first panoramic images from the Chang'e-4 lunar mission were released on Friday offering the first look at the horizon from within the Von Kármán crater on the far side of the Moon.

The image was taken using the Terrain Camera (TCAM) on the 1,200 kg Chang'e-4 lander. The spacecraft made the first ever landing on the far side of the Moon, which never faces the Earth, on January 3.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-12, 04:28 PM
Uh....selv? You know that’s animation, right? [emoji1]

The article from Planetary Society has the actual video.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/change-4-update.html


Everything is going well 9 days after China's Chang'e-4 mission made a historic landing on the far side of the Moon, the country's space program said today. On 6 January, the Yutu-2 rover started a planned midday nap to avoid overheating while the Sun was directly overhead. Yesterday, it woke up and continued exploring its surroundings. Additionally, a fresh batch of images and video are revealing more about the mission's landing site within Von Kármán crater.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-12, 06:04 PM
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), locates Chang'e-4 on the moon.

http://www.leonarddavid.com/nasa-moon-orbiter-pinpoints-chinas-farside-landing-locale/


NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) imagery has been used to further pinpoint the landing locale of China’s Chang’e-4 farside lander.

Looking at the just released Chang’e-4 descent frames to the surface made it easy to find the exact landing spot in a Narrow Angle Camera image produced by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. That image was taken prior to the Chang’e-4’s touchdown, explains Mark Robinson, the principal investigator of the LROC at Arizona State University in Tempe.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-13, 02:09 PM
THis report is about Chang'e-4 role to monitor the temperature of the Luna day and night. It also contains a one liner about Russia's contribution to the mission.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/13/c_137740516.htm


Tan Mei, a consultant for the probe from CAST, said Chang'e-4 will switch to a "sleep mode" during the lunar night due to the lack of solar power, and rely on the radioisotope heat source, a collaboration between Chinese and Russian scientists, to keep warm.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-15, 04:22 PM
A string of news releases on Chang'e-4. The 1st one by BBC of the rover and the lander taking pictures of each other.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46836047


A Chinese rover and lander have taken images of each other on the Moon's surface.

"Chief designer of Chang'e-4 on challenges, countermeasures of soft-landing on far side of Moon" in Mandarin.

http://www.cctvplus.com/news/20190114/8100643.shtml#!language=1


Storyline

China adopted two means to enable the soft landing of Chang'e-4 on the complicated terrain on the far side of the Moon, said the chief designer of the probe on Monday.

Sun Zezhou told a media briefing in Beijing how China achieved soft-landing on the far side of the Moon.

"China's new lunar rover faces challenges on moon's far side"

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/15/c_137743699.htm


China's second lunar rover Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), which is the first ever rover to drive on the moon's far side, will face considerable challenges brought by complicated terrain in its future exploration, said Chinese space experts on Monday.

"China's lunar exploration program to meet goal of sample returning by 2020"

http://www.cctvplus.com/news/20190114/8100605.shtml#!language=1


China's lunar exploration program will have met the goal of orbiting and landing on the Moon and bringing samples back to Earth by 2020, said an official with China National Space Administration (CNSA) on Monday.

Wu Yanhua, deputy head of CNSA and deputy chief commander of China's lunar exploration program, made the statement at a press briefing on China's lunar exploration program in Beijing.

"China's lunar exploration program will have achieved the three-step objective of 'orbiting, landing and sample returning' by 2020. Since the program was launched after being approved by the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the State Council in 2004, we have achieved five continuous successes -- the Chang'e-1, Chang'e-2, Chang'e-3, a test craft for Chang'e-5, and Chang'e-4," said Wu.

"China committed to international cooperation in space program"

http://www.cctvplus.com/news/20190114/8100604.shtml#!language=1


China has always been committed to international cooperation in its space program, an official with China National Space Administration (CNSA) said in Beijing on Monday.

Wu Yanhua, deputy director of CNSA, told reporters at a news briefing on the Chang'e-4 mission that it has involved a lot of international cooperation.

Wu, who is also deputy head of China Lunar Exploration Program, said, "China has always followed the principle of openness and cooperation in its space programs. The Chang'e-4 probe is equipped with 13 payloads, four of which are in cooperation with Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands and Saudi Arabia. It also takes a lunar micro-satellite Longjiang."

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-16, 11:50 AM
Andrew Jones report includes the information that the silkworms were replaced by fruit flies.
https://gbtimes.com/change-4-cotton-seeds-are-sprouting-on-the-far-side-of-the-moon?cat=chinas-space-program


Previous, widespread reports state that silkworm cocoons would also be involved. According to Quartz, citing a December report from Guancha, the team was originally planning to send silkworm cocoons but later opted for fruit flies instead.

The species selection was according to strict requirements due to the limited size of the payload and the extreme conditions of the lunar surface. The animal and plant species selected were required to be able to withstand large swings in temperatures and radiation.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-16, 01:55 PM
Night, night, Chang'e-4. Sweet dreams till January 28th.

https://spacenews.com/change-4-spacecraft-enter-lunar-nighttime-china-planning-future-missions-cooperation/


The Chang’e-4 lander and rover have powered down for a first lunar nighttime on the far side of the moon following a successful landing and first set of surface activities.

Nighttime began over the landing site in Von Kármán crater within the South Pole-Aitken Basin late Jan. 13 UTC, bringing an end to the mission’s first daytime.

With the use of a Russian-developed radioisotope thermoelectric generator —an upgrade on the previous Chang’e-3 lander and rover mission and prototype for future deep-space exploration—the Chang’e-4 lander will be able to run at a low level of activity and will take soil temperature measurements.

The Yutu-2 rover meanwhile will have folded it its solar panels and entered a sleep mode, relying on a radioisotope heater unit for the 14-Earth-day long lunar nighttime, when temperatures will plunge well below -100 degrees Celsius (-148 Fahrenheit).

The lander and rover will resume their science and exploration activities following sunrise early Jan. 28.

selvaarchi
2019-Jan-31, 02:57 PM
Good morning Chang'e-4.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/31/c_137789743.htm


The rover and the lander of the Chang'e-4 probe have been awakened by sunlight after a long "sleep" during the first extremely cold night on the moon, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced on Thursday.

The lander woke up at 8:39 p.m. Wednesday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at about 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, surviving their first lunar night after making the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon, said CNSA.

Brrrr it is cold up here.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-01/31/c_137789734.htm


China's Chang'e-4 probe, having made the first-ever soft landing on moon's far side, found that the temperature of the lunar surface dropped to as low as minus 190 degrees centigrade, colder than expected.

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-01, 11:58 AM
Change-4 and Yutu-2 will take their 2nd siesta on February 3rd.

https://gbtimes.com/change-4-yutu-2-to-nap-to-protect-against-midday-heat-after-surviving-190-c-nighttime?cat=chinas-space-program


The Chang'e-4 mission Yutu-2 rover is once again set to take a nap on the far side of the Moon to protect against high temperatures resulting from direct solar radiation.

Yutu-2 awoke for its second lunar day in Von Kármán crater on January 29 after stopping activities on January 12 in preparation to endure temperatures which dropped to minus 190 Celsius (-310 F) during the nighttime.

The rover will 'sleep' once again after just a few days of activity, but this time to escape the midday heat, which could raise the temperature on the sunlit side of the craft to over 100 degrees.

The 140 kg rover will enter a protective standby mode on February 3, according the China lunar spaceflight social media account linked to the Chang'e-4 mission, as the rover does not have thermal self-regulation capabilities comparable to the 1,200 kg dry mass Chang'e-4 lander.

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-06, 02:59 PM
China’s Longjiang-2 satellite has taken a full far side of the moon and earth is in the background.

https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/5/18211975/china-longjiang-2-satellite-moon-far-side-picture-change-4


A Chinese satellite currently in lunar orbit snapped this incredible image of the far side of the Moon, with a tiny Earth hanging out in the background. Captured on February 3rd, the picture offers a rare perspective of the Earth and Moon system together.

bknight
2019-Feb-06, 04:10 PM
Nearly as impressive as "Earthrise".

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-07, 03:49 PM
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spots Chang'e-4 lander.

https://www.space.com/43252-china-far-side-moon-lander-nasa-photo.html


China's history-making Chang'e 4 mission has been spied by one of its robotic moon-studying brethren.

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently caught a glinty glimpse of the Chang'e 4 lander, which on Jan. 2 became the first-ever spacecraft to make a soft touchdown on the moon's mysterious far side.

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-08, 12:28 AM
Andrew Jones on a round up of what Chang'e-4 lander, Yutu-2 and Queqiao have done to date.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2019/change-4-mission-updates.html


China has all but shut down to welcome the Year of the Pig and Yutu-2 is taking a precautionary midday nap, but the Chang’e-4 mission is still sending us some new and brilliant footage from its various spacecraft—while also being snapped by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-09, 11:04 AM
NASA's LROC has spotted the Chang'e lander and rover.

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1091


On 30 January LROC acquired a spectacular limb shot centered on the Chang'e 4 landing site, looking across the floor of Von Kármán crater. At the time, LRO was more than 200 kilometers from the landing site so Chang'e 4 was only a few pixels across and the rover was not discernable. The following day LRO was closer to the site and again slewed (59° this time) to capture another view. This time the small Yutu-2 rover shows up (two pixels) just north of the lander. Also, shadows cast by the lander and rover are now visible.

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-13, 12:27 PM
The lander and rover have gone to sleep fot the second time on Monday. Yutu-2 has now driven 120 meters to date. Slightly more that the 114.8 meters Yutu-1 achieved.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-02/13/c_137818637.htm

[QUOTE]The lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have been switched to dormant mode for the lunar night after working stably during the past lunar day, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced Wednesday.

The lander was switched to a dormant mode at 7:00 p.m. Monday as scheduled, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), at 8:00 p.m., said the CNSA.

According to China's Lunar and Deep Space Exploration Center, the rover will be woken up on Feb. 28 and the lander on March 1.[QUOTE]

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-13, 01:05 PM
Two power point presentations made on the 12th of February at he 56th session of UNOOSA's Scientific and Technical Subcommittee in Vienna. The 1st on Chang'e-4 and future of China's moon missions. The 2nd by Simona Zoffoli of the Italian Space Agency on "CSES Mission (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite): Italy and China in Space".

http://www.unoosa.org/documents/pdf/copuos/stsc/2019/tech-03E.pdf

http://www.unoosa.org/documents/pdf/copuos/stsc/2019/tech-01E.pdf

selvaarchi
2019-Feb-15, 06:35 PM
The landing site of Chang'e-4 has been given a name - Statio Tianhe

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-02/15/c_137825242.htm


The landing site of China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe has been named "Statio Tianhe" after the spacecraft made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon last month.

Together with three nearby impact craters and one hill, the name was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), Liu Jizhong, director of the China Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), said at a joint press conference.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-02, 01:48 AM
Good Morning Yutu-2

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-03/01/c_137860566.htm


The rover and the lander of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work after "sleeping" during their second lunar night on the far side of the moon.

The lander woke up at 7:52 a.m. Friday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at about 10:51 a.m. Thursday. Both of them are in normal condition, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-05, 01:07 PM
"China to open Chang'e-4 lunar probe data to world"

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1140753.shtml


China will gradually open data collected by the Chang'e-4 lunar probe to the world, the country's lunar program chief designer said.

Wu Weiren, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, made the statement in his capacity as a member of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, the country's top political advisory body, on the sidelines of its annual session, which opened on Sunday.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-06, 03:52 PM
The lander and rover have gone to sleep fot the second time on Monday. Yutu-2 has now driven 120 meters to date. Slightly more that the 114.8 meters Yutu-1 achieved.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-02/13/c_137818637.htm

It now has travelled another 7 meters.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-03/06/c_137873486.htm


China's lunar rover has conducted scientific detection on some stones on the far side of the moon, which might help scientists find out whether they are from outer space or native to the moon.

The rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, was sent to the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3 in the Chang'e-4 mission.

Currently, the rover has traveled about 127 meters on the moon, and is taking a "noon break" as the temperature on the moon rises extremely high. It's scheduled to resume work on March 10 and switch to its dormant mode on March 13, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-09, 02:42 AM
3 of the women behind the Chang'e-4 mission.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-03/08/c_137878220.htm


The moon has traditionally been associated with women, maybe because the menstrual cycle is roughly the length of the waxing and waning lunar cycle. Now China's lunar exploration program, named after the moon goddess Chang'e, is highlighting the contributions of female scientists and engineers.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-09, 02:51 AM
Andrew Jones on what Chang'e-3 and Yutu-2 have done since landing.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/yutu-2-lunar-day-3.html


China’s Yutu-2 rover is continuing to make tracks on the lunar far side and has returned new images of rocks in its path inside Von Kármán crater, while the lander and rover continue with their science objectives.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-14, 03:09 PM
Yutu-2 expected to last more than 3 months. It has also traveled 163 meters to date.

http://www.leonarddavid.com/chinas-farside-moon-rover-expected-to-last-longer-than-design-life/


China’s lunar rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, has driven nearly 540 feet (163 meters) on the Moon’s farside. Controllers on Earth expect the machinery to work longer than its three-month design life.

Both the rover and the lander of the Chang’e-4 lunar probe switched to a dormant mode on Wednesday as the extremely cold lunar night fell, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration (CNSA).

Space News also carried the news with additional information of Queqiao (‘Magpie bridge’).

https://spacenews.com/change-4-spacecraft-enter-third-lunar-night-yutu-2-reaches-design-lifetime/


As the far side of the moon never faces the Earth, communication and data transmission between ground stations and the Chang’e-4 spacecraft has been facilitated by a relay satellite stationed in a halo orbit around the second Earth-moon Lagrange point.

The Queqiao (‘Magpie bridge’) satellite earlier this month turned on a low frequency astronomy payload, the Netherlands-China Low-Frequency Explorer, for the first time. NCLE will gradually deploy its three five-meter-long antennae to make observations of the solar system and, potentially, signals from the cosmic ‘dark ages’.

A laser ranging test involving an observatory in the southern Chinese province of Yunnan is expected to be carried out in March, targeting a laser retroreflector aboard the Queqiao satellite.

selvaarchi
2019-Mar-30, 01:30 PM
"China's lunar rover Yutu-2 resumes work after third lunar night"

http://en.people.cn/n3/2019/0330/c90000-9562294.html


China's lunar rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, has woken up from its third lunar night on the far side of the moon and resumed its scientific exploration mission.

According to the China National Space Administration, the lunar rover woke itself up at 8:28 p.m. on Friday and re-established communications with its relay satellite.

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-10, 07:22 PM
Yutu-2 has now traveled 170.92 meters inits new home. Unfortunately China has not released any new photos of the environment.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-04/09/c_137963322.htm


China's lunar rover has driven 170.92 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

The rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, took a "noon break" from April 2 to April 8, as the temperatures on the moon were extremely high, and continued its exploration, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-16, 02:20 PM
Yutu-2 has goon to sleep again.

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chinas_Change_4_probe_switches_to_dormant_mode_999 .html


The lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to dormant mode for the lunar night on Friday, with the rover traveling an accumulated 178.9 meters on the far side of the moon.

The rover Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit-2, is expected to awaken again on April 28, and the lander to awaken the following day, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-18, 12:18 AM
China defends the speed of Yutu-2.

Goes anyone have the speed of the US and Russian rovers on the moon and the US rovers on Mars.

http://www.ecns.cn/news/2019-04-17/detail-ifzhhxra9211955.shtml


As of Thursday, the Yutu II lunar rover has "walked" a total of 178 meters on the moon, Sun said.

Some may question the speed of the lunar rover, given it landed on the far side of the moon in January, four months ago.

"Yutu II is not slow at all," Pang Zhihao, an expert in space exploration technology, told the Global Times on Tuesday, saying that the rover prioritizes safety on the lunar surface by design and it is selecting the most research-valuable path through a rather comprehensive calculation, which takes time.

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-22, 11:48 AM
At last, some new pictures from Tutu-2.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2019/change-4-updates-day-4.html


China’s Chang’e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover are continuing to function well and have completed their fourth lunar day since landing on the far side of the Moon on 3 January 2019 this year.

Though no real science results have emerged yet, scientists involved stated in correspondence (paywall) to Nature Geoscience that the landing site shows "potential evidence of excavated deep mafic material, which could reveal the mineralogy of the lunar mantle."

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-23, 03:29 PM
"A Dutch radio antenna on the farside of the Moon has successfully provided its first data."

http://www.leonarddavid.com/farside-of-moon-radio-antenna-first-data/


The Netherlands-China Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE) is onboard China’s Queqiao relay satellite in a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 Lagrange point.

From that position, Queqiao is enabling communications between the China’s Chang’e-4 farside lander and Yutu-2 rover and the Earth.

NCLE is an instrument designed to measure radio waves from the Universe and was developed by a team from the Radboud Radio Lab of the Radboud University, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON) and the company Innovative Solutions in Space (ISIS).

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-29, 04:10 PM
"China's Chang'e-4 probe resumes work for fifth lunar day"

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-04/29/c_138021848.htm


The lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work for the fifth lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extreme cold night.

The lander woke up at 7:40 a.m. Monday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at 1:45 p.m. Sunday. Both are in normal working condition, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Apr-29, 04:21 PM
Yutu-2 has now traveled 170.92 meters inits new home. Unfortunately China has not released any new photos of the environment.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-04/09/c_137963322.htm

Ever wondered how far our other rovers traveled on the moon and Mars? Wonder no more, NASA has the answers.

https://ourplnt.com/driving-distances-mars-moon-records/


This chart, prepared by NASA illustrates comparisons among the driving distances by various wheeled vehicles on the surface of the planetary bodies other than Earth (as of February 13, 2019, only the moon and Mars). Opportunity rover, which declared dead after record-breaking 15-years on the Martian surface also holds the off-Earth roving distance record after accruing 45.16 kilometers (28.06 miles) of driving on Mars.

selvaarchi
2019-May-12, 11:36 AM
The rover has added another 12 meters on its journey on the moon and now has gone to sleep for another 14 days.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-05/11/c_138051093.htm


China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 190.66 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to dormant mode for the lunar night on Saturday, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-May-15, 02:14 PM
"China’s SmallSat Lunar Mission Longjiang-2 to Deorbit on 31 July"

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2019/chinas-smallssat-lunar.html


According to amateur spacecraft tracker Daniel Estévez, Longjiang-2 will crash into the Moon on 31 July after more than a year in lunar orbit. Longjiang-2 is one of a pair of small satellites that launched to the Moon along with the Chang’e-4 relay satellite Queqiao on 21 May 2018. Longjiang-2’s partner Longjiang-1 failed to enter lunar orbit, but Longjiang-2 succeeded, and amateur radio operators on Earth have been commanding it to take cool photos ever since.

selvaarchi
2019-May-16, 01:16 PM
Yutu-2 may have only traveled 190.66 meters on the lunar surface but is providing a bountiful of scientific data. 4 articles from - China, "nature", "National Geographic" and "Scientific American" tell the story.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-05/16/c_138062999.htm


China's Yutu-2, the first rover on the far side of the moon, has found materials from deep inside the moon that could help unravel the mystery of the lunar mantle composition and the formation and evolution of the moon and the earth.

Using data obtained by the visible and near infrared spectrometer installed on Yutu-2, a research team led by Li Chunlai, with the National Astronomical Observatories of China under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, found that the lunar soil in the landing area of the Chang'e-4 probe contains olivine and pyroxene which came from the lunar mantle deep inside the moon.

The first important scientific discovery of the Chang'e-4 probe since it made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon was published online in the latest issue of the academic journal Nature.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1189-0


Over 60 years of spacecraft exploration has revealed that the Earth’s Moon is characterized by a lunar crust1 dominated by the mineral plagioclase, overlying a more mafic (richer in iron and magnesium) mantle of uncertain composition. Both crust and mantle formed during the earliest stages of lunar evolution when late-stage accretional energy caused a molten rock (magma) ocean, flotation of the light plagioclase, sinking of the denser iron-rich minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, and eventually solidification2. Very large impact craters can potentially penetrate through the crust and sample the lunar mantle. The largest of these craters is the approximately 2,500-kilometre-diameter South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin3 on the lunar far side. Evidence obtained from orbiting spacecraft shows that the floor of the SPA basin is rich in mafic minerals4, but their mantle origin is controversial and their in situ geologic settings are poorly known. China’s Chang’E-4 lunar far-side lander recently touched down in the Von Kármán crater5,6 to explore the floor of the huge SPA basin and deployed its rover, Yutu-2. Here we report on the initial spectral observations of the Visible and Near Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS)7 onboard Yutu-2, which we interpret to represent the presence of low-calcium (ortho)pyroxene and olivine, materials that may originate from the lunar mantle. Geological context6 suggests that these materials were excavated from below the SPA floor by the nearby 72-km-diameter Finsen impact crater event, and transported to the landing site. Continued exploration by Yutu-2 will target these materials on the floor of the Von Kármán crater to understand their geologic context, origin and abundance, and to assess the possibility of sample-return scenarios.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/05/china-rover-chang-e4-found-strange-rocks-from-deep-onside-moon-mantle/


Kicking off the new year with a bang, China made history in early January by landing the first-ever spacecraft on the far side of the moon. Now, results from that mission suggest another bombshell: the first signs of lunar mantle material available for scientific study.

Yutu-2, the rover partner to the Chang’e-4 lander, used reflected radiation to analyze the minerals within its landing site inside the moon’s Von Kármán crater. In doing so, it spotted layers rich in two mineral types that aren’t a match for typical lunar crust. The study authors argue that it is likely these mineral patches represent upper mantle material, according to work appearing today in the journal Nature.

If confirmed, mantle rock from the moon would give researchers a game-changing look at our celestial companion’s inner workings, perhaps helping to solve long-standing mysteries about the moon’s formation and evolution. (Find out why geologists now think the moon may be more tectonically active than previously realized.)

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/from-the-lunar-far-side-chinas-rover-reveals-moons-hidden-depths/


In the 1960s and 1970s, the United States and the Soviet Union conducted unprecedented lunar exploration programs that remain unmatched to this day. The American crewed Apollo landings were complemented by uncrewed Soviet landings, with both yielding revolutionary bounties of scientific data, such as the hundreds of kilograms of lunar rock and soil that the missions returned to Earth. Oddly missing from all those samples, however, was any material that indisputably originated from the moon’s rocky mantle. Lying just beneath the cratered, desolate crust, the moon’s upper mantle is thought to be the frozen remnant of a vast magma ocean that existed more than 4 billion years ago. Directly studying samples of the mantle could unlock previously hidden chapters of lunar history, potentially reshaping our broader understanding of planetary formation and evolution. Now, a Chinese mission has discovered signs of mantle material at the moon’s surface, effectively setting an “X” on lunar maps for future explorers seeking this not-so-buried geological treasure.

selvaarchi
2019-May-16, 01:52 PM
Yutu-2 may have only traveled 190.66 meters on the lunar surface but is providing a bountiful of scientific data. 4 articles from - China, "nature", "National Geographic" and "Scientific American" tell the story.

I stand corrected- the observations were made on Yutu-2's 1st lunar day!

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2019/change-4-may-have-discovered.html


The paper was submitted in February, meaning it is based only on observations of lunar soil made in the first lunar day of the mission. Chang’e-4 and Yutu-2 have recently concluded their fifth lunar day of activity. During day 3, Yutu-2 was understood to have approached rocks for analysis by VNIS.

selvaarchi
2019-May-29, 02:10 PM
"China's Chang'e-4 probe resumes work for sixth lunar day"

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-05/29/c_138099697.htm


The lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work for the sixth lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extremely cold night.

The lander woke up at 6 p.m. Tuesday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at 2:16 a.m. Tuesday, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

For the sixth lunar day, the lander's neutron radiation detector and low-frequency radio detector will be restarted to conduct scientific tasks including particle radiation observation and low-frequency radio astronomical observation.

selvaarchi
2019-Jun-11, 05:26 AM
Yutu-2's moto is "slow and steady wins the race" :D It did another 22.66 meters in the last 14 days before going to sleep on Sunday.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-06/10/c_138131399.htm


China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 212.99 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to its dormant mode for the lunar night late on Sunday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Jun-28, 12:09 PM
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is keeping an eye on Chang'e-4.

http://www.leonarddavid.com/nasa-moon-orbiter-new-imagery-of-chinas-farside-mission/


NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has snapped new imagery of China’s Yutu-2 rover that is still on the move!

The orbiter’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) shows the wheeled rover about 426 feet (130 meters) west of the Chang’e-4 lander.

Once a month, LRO passes over the Chang’e 4 landing site, allowing LROC to capture a new image. LROC has now imaged the site five times (since the landing) on January 3 and observed Yutu-2 to have traveled a total of 610 feet (186 meters) – the distance measured using the rover tracks.

selvaarchi
2019-Jun-29, 11:12 AM
Andrew Jones on Chang'e-4. From the picture taken by Chang'e-4, you can make out that the rover is not traveling in a straight line. You can make out three areas where it has moved in circles. No explanation given for this movement.

https://spacenews.com/change-4-begins-lunar-day-7-after-yutu-2-rover-overcomes-cosmic-challenges/


The Chang’e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover resumed science and exploration activities June 27 for the start of the mission’s seventh lunar day on the far side of the moon.

The 140-kilogram Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2) rover awoke at 1:26 a.m. Eastern, followed by the lander at 9:45 p.m., with both spacecraft and their science payloads working normally, according to an update from the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration issued Thursday.

The spacecraft had powered down on the morning of June 9, folding solar arrays in preparation for the 14.5-Earth-day-long lunar night, during which the pair use radioisotope heater units to protect against temperatures as low as minus 190 Celsius (minus 310 Fahrenheit).

Roger E. Moore
2019-Jun-29, 02:39 PM
Andrew Jones on Chang'e-4. From the picture taken by Chang'e-4, you can make out that the rover is not traveling in a straight line. You can make out three areas where it has moved in circles. No explanation given for this movement.

My guess is a rock caught in the wheels, or photographing an interesting spot from different angles.

selvaarchi
2019-Jul-17, 01:26 PM
Chang'e-4 mission is using a chip made by ESA.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2019/07/Chang_e-4_lander


At a time when ESA is looking forward to future lunar exploration, it turns out there is already some small but crucial ESA-developed hardware in operation on the far side of the Moon.

China’s Chang’e-4 lander is running on a LEON2-FT microprocessor core, especially designed for space missions by ESA and sold commercially by the Microchip company – marketed as the AT697.

The ordinary computer chips you use every day in your phone or laptop would be rapidly degraded by the radiation and environmental extremes of space. Specialised chips are therefore essential for spacecraft

Chang’e-4 touched down inside the Von Kármán crater on the Moon’s far side near the south pole on 3 January 2019. The lander and the rover it delivered are currently hibernating during the lunar night, having survived seven month-long lunar days so far.

“Most ESA missions launched after about 2010 include at least one LEON chip, and hundreds of these radiation-hardened off-the-shelf chips have also been sold to space missions both in Europe and around the globe,” explains ESA microelectronics engineer Agustin Fernandez-Leon.

selvaarchi
2019-Jul-30, 01:18 PM
Yutu-2's moto is "slow and steady wins the race" :D It did another 22.66 meters in the last 14 days before going to sleep on Sunday.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-06/10/c_138131399.htm

After the 6th day Yutu-2 did 212.99 meters. Now as it wakes up for the 8th day, the report shows only 210 meters travelled! Has Yutu-2 got a problem with its wheels like Yutu-1?

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chinese_lunar_lander_awaken_for_8th_day_999.html


The Chinese moon mission that includes the lander Chang'e-4 and rover Yutu 2 (Jade Rabbit 2) awoke to begin their eighth month of work on the far side of the Moon, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) said on Saturday.

"The Chang'e-4 lander successfully awoke from dormant mode on Friday, 7:12 p.m. Beijing time [11:12 a.m. GMT] and began the eighth month of work on the Moon. The payloads on board, including radiation and neutron dosimeters and a low-frequency radio spectrograph, will turn on sequentially, and the research will be conducted as scheduled", the statement read.

According to the statement, the Yutu 2 lunar rover awoke slightly earlier and its payload will restart shortly in order to carry out the planned work. It is equipped with a high-resolution camera that transmits unique pictures of the Moon's dark side.

As of today, the rover has travelled more than 210 meters (689 feet), the statement added.

selvaarchi
2019-Aug-01, 11:46 AM
How much did Chang'e-4 cost?

http://www.ecns.cn/news/sci-tech/2019-07-31/detail-ifzmnmiq8702425.shtml


Recently, CGTN Digital received questions from readers about the cost of China's Chang'e-4 lunar mission.

So how much money did China spend on building the Chang'e-4 lunar lander, the Yutu-2 lunar rover and the rocket to send them to the far side of the Moon?

According to Wu Yanhua, deputy director of the project, the total cost of the mission was "not much."

"The cost is close to building one kilometer of subway," he said in a press conference back in January 2019.

The cost-per-kilometer of subway in China varies from 500 million yuan (about 72.6 million U.S. dollars) to 1.2 billion yuan (about 172.4 million U.S. dollars), based on the difficulty of construction.

So we still don't have the exact number, but the range is close enough to give people a solid estimation of the cost of a Moon trip.

By comparison, India's ongoing Chandrayaan-2 mission has already cost about 141 million U.S. dollars.

selvaarchi
2019-Aug-02, 07:06 PM
"China's micro lunar orbiter crashes into Moon under control"

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201908/02/WS5d43d539a310cf3e355638fe.html


China's micro lunar orbiter Longjiang-2 has crashed into the Moon under ground control after it completed its mission, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

The micro satellite crashed into a predetermined area on the far side of the Moon at 10:20 pm on July 31 (Beijing Time), the center said Friday.

selvaarchi
2019-Aug-06, 04:20 PM
Andrew Jones on China's micro lunar orbiter Longjiang-2.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2019/longjiang-2-impacts-moon.html


At 14:08 UTC on 31 July, Longjiang-2, also known as DSLWP-B, passed behind the Moon for the last time. Half an hour later, with an absence of new signals to indicate a reappearance, it was clear that the Moon had lost an orbiter and gained a new crater on its far side. According to a prediction by Daniel Estévez, the 50-centimeter-tall, 47-kilogram DSLWP-B satellite impacted at 14:20 UTC.

Not to worry—this was a planned measure to prevent potential collisions or debris for future missions. A maneuver performed 24 January lowered the periapsis of the satellite’s lunar orbit by about 500 kilometers, with orbital perturbations over time seeing the satellite impacting the Moon Wednesday after 432 days in lunar orbit.

selvaarchi
2019-Aug-08, 02:11 PM
After the 6th day Yutu-2 did 212.99 meters. Now as it wakes up for the 8th day, the report shows only 210 meters travelled! Has Yutu-2 got a problem with its wheels like Yutu-1?

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chinese_lunar_lander_awaken_for_8th_day_999.html

Happy to report, I was wrong. Yutu-2 has travelled another 51 meters :clap:

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-08/08/c_138292871.htm


China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 271 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to its dormant mode for the lunar night on Wednesday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Aug-25, 02:24 PM
Chang'e-4 is awake for the 9th lunar day.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-08/25/c_138337316.htm


The lander and rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work for the ninth lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extremely cold night.

The lander woke up at 8:10 a.m. Sunday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at 8:42 a.m. Saturday, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

For the ninth lunar day, the lander's neutron radiation detector and low-frequency radio detector, as well as the rover's infrared imaging spectrometer and other instruments will be restarted to conduct scientific tasks including moon surface observation and composition analysis.

Swift
2019-Sep-04, 08:09 PM
From Smithsonian (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/chinas-claims-lunar-rover-found-lustrous-gel-substance-moon-180973032/)


On July 28, China’s Yutu-2 lunar rover prepared to power down for its daily nap to protect itself from the midday sun during its mission to study the far side of the moon. Before it could finally shut down, one of its handlers here on Earth noticed something strange in one of the panoramic images the moon robot had taken. Inside a small crater there appeared to be a strangely colored substance with a “gel-like” consistency.

The rover team scrapped their plans for rest to investigate the crater, examining the lustrous spot with Yutu’s Visible and Near-Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS), reports Andrew Jones at Space.com. The results of that analysis, however, have not been released nor have images of the mystery substance. News of the substance appeared on the Chinese-language Yutu-2 “drive diary” on the website Our Space and was tweeted out by the state-run newspaper People’s Daily.

In the absence of details, the announcement has led to speculation. The most likely explanation, Jones reports, is that the lustrous spot isn’t really a gel, but is some form of shiny melted glass created when a meteorite struck the moon.


I'd have to vote for a glass of some sort too, rather than a gel. Almost wonder if this is a bit of a translation error. Still, an interesting find.

selvaarchi
2019-Sep-07, 10:33 AM
Yutu-2 keeps making steady progress - as the saying goes - slow and steady wins the race (not sure what race)

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-09/07/c_138372596.htm


China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 284.66 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to its dormant mode for the lunar night on Friday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

selvaarchi
2019-Sep-23, 04:03 AM
80% of the interview with Professor Yang Yuguang at the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation is devoted to Chang'e-4 , so I am posting it in this thread.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLuCgdwYOiM


Professor Yang Yuguang at the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation talked with CGTN's Elaine Reyes about the latest achievements, and future prospects, of China's space program.

selvaarchi
2019-Sep-23, 05:57 AM
"China's lunar rover discovers mysterious material on far side of Moon"

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chinas_lunar_rover_discovers_mysterious_material_o n_far_side_of_Moon_999.html


utu-2, the lunar rover for China's Chang'e-4 mission, grabbed attention last month after its drive team spotted some unusual "gel-like" material while roving close to a small crater.

The Chinese-language science outreach publication Our Space, which announced the findings on August 17, used the term "jiao zhuang wu", which can be translated as "gel-like," Space.com reported. This notion sparked wide interest and speculation among lunar scientists.

Along with new images of the stuff on the moon, the post released over the weekend by Chinese-language science outreach publication Our Space via its WeChat social media account details how the Yutu-2 team carefully approached the crater in order to analyze the specimen, despite risks.

One of the images shows two of the rover's six wheels and the contents of an approximately 7-foot-wide (2 meters) crater. The green, rectangular area and red circle within are suspected to be related to the field of view of the Visible and Near-Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS) instrument, rather than the subject matter itself, according to some lunar scientists.

After obtaining the first set of data that VIRS, one of Yutu-2's four science payloads, collected at the crater in July, the Yutu-2 team deemed it to be unsatisfactory due to shadows, so the team members attempted a second approach and measurement during the following lunar day in August. According to Our Space, satisfactory detection was made - but the results were not released.

selvaarchi
2019-Sep-24, 01:11 PM
Yutu-2 has wakened for the 10th lunar day.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201909/24/WS5d89a887a310cf3e3556d262.html


The lander of the Chang'e-4 probe and the Yutu-2 rover have resumed work for the 10th lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extremely cold lunar night.

The lander woke up at 8:26 pm Monday, and the rover awoke at 8:30 pm Sunday (Beijing Time). Both are in normal working condition, according to the center.

The rover has traveled about 285 meters on the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

selvaarchi
2019-Sep-25, 01:55 PM
"Reconstructing the first successful lunar farside landing"

http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Reconstructing_the_first_successful_lunar_farside_ landing_999.html


In January of this year, China's Chang'E-4 - the fourth version of a lunar spacecraft named for the Chinese goddess of the Moon - landed on the far side of the Moon. Due to the location of the landing, Chang'E-4 had to navigate autonomously, without the guidance of scientists on Earth.

Now, a research team, headed by LI Chunlai, corresponding author of this results and a professor of the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), has published a full reconstruction of the Chang'E-4's landing. The results appeared on September 24 in Nature Communications.

"This mission had the major challenge of landing on the lunar farside without traditional radio signal techniques due to the missing line-of-sight," said LIU Jianjun, paper author and professor at the Key Laboratory of Lunar and Deep Space Exploration of NAOC.

"The landing was successful, and we have now reconstructed the landing trajectory and positioning techniques to better understand the process."

selvaarchi
2019-Oct-23, 01:07 PM
The rover has added another 5 meters on its 10th day on the moon. It has now awaken for its 11th day on the moon.

http://www.ecns.cn/news/sci-tech/2019-10-23/detail-ifzpzfnq8046988.shtml


The lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work for the 11th lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extremely cold night.

The lander woke up at 5:11 a.m. Wednesday (Beijing Time), and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday. Both are in normal working conditions, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

The rover has traveled about 290 meters on the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

selvaarchi
2019-Nov-04, 03:53 PM
The rover has picked up speed and traveled 28.11 meters on the 12th lunar day.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-11/04/c_138527338.htm


China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 318.62 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration of the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have ended their work for the 11th lunar day, and switched to dormant mode for the lunar night on Monday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

The rover is now located 218.11 meters northwest of the lander.