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Cougar
2016-Mar-03, 06:15 PM
This is one early galaxy! Small, blobby, forming stars quickly. Hubblesite news center (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/07/full/)

antoniseb
2016-Mar-03, 06:39 PM
This is one early galaxy! Small, blobby, forming stars quickly. Hubblesite news center (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/07/full/)
I'll be interested in seeing what the JWST makes of this 3 or more years from now... likewise I'll bet ALMA could get some more resolution on this object now.

efanton
2016-Mar-03, 06:44 PM
more here

https://arxiver.wordpress.com/2016/03/03/a-remarkably-luminous-galaxy-at-z11-1-measured-with-hubble-space-telescope-grism-spectroscopy-ga/

01101001
2016-Mar-03, 08:36 PM
Already cited HubbleSite article (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/07/full/)


The combination of Hubble's and Spitzer's imaging reveals that GN-z11 is 25 times smaller than the Milky Way and has just one percent of our galaxy's mass in stars. However, the newborn GN-z11 is growing fast, forming stars at a rate about 20 times greater than our galaxy does today. This makes such an extremely remote galaxy bright enough for astronomers to find and perform detailed observations with both Hubble and Spitzer.

Who was it -- gfellow? yeah: Forget 400 million - How about a 200 million year old (young) galaxy..? (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?160313-Forget-400-million-How-about-a-200-million-year-old-%28young%29-galaxy) -- who was all mystified that a galaxy could be born so early? Like it would somehow take too much time for gravity to gather the stars (because... fish teeth?). Look how small it is. Just an itty-bitty baby! Yet making loads of new stars as it was photographed -- in situ and not collecting them.

Galaxies are dynamic things and early-universe embryonic galaxies are extra-dynamic. They don't have to follow the logic of existing behemoths like the Milky Way.


The results reveal surprising new clues about the nature of the very early universe. "It's amazing that a galaxy so massive existed only 200 million to 300 million years after the very first stars started to form. It takes really fast growth, producing stars at a huge rate, to have formed a galaxy that is a billion solar masses so soon," explained investigator Garth Illingworth of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

George
2016-Mar-03, 10:31 PM
This is one early galaxy! Small, blobby, forming stars quickly. Hubblesite news center (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/07/full/)

z = 22.2 could be the point when these stars would have first formed. There are about 2E22 stars in the universe, so why not? :) [I am hoping for 6E23 stars, however.]

John Mendenhall
2016-Mar-04, 05:42 AM
more here

https://arxiver.wordpress.com/2016/03/03/a-remarkably-luminous-galaxy-at-z11-1-measured-with-hubble-space-telescope-grism-spectroscopy-ga/

Thank you, good link.

Swift
2016-Mar-04, 02:36 PM
[I am hoping for 6E23 stars, however.]
A one molar universe. :D

George
2016-Mar-04, 04:18 PM
A one molar universe. :D

Yeah, and I'd like to see the thread that would come from that result. :)