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Copernicus
2016-Apr-06, 08:41 PM
Is there any correlation to breaking radiation, soft quanta, and muon mass?

Copernicus
2016-Apr-06, 11:54 PM
The bremsstrahlung radiation, which is Krad what are the units?

Reality Check
2016-Apr-07, 01:29 AM
Is there any correlation to breaking radiation, soft quanta, and muon mass?
Short answer: No.
Long answer: What "breaking radiation, soft quanta, and muon mass"? By "breaking radiation", I assume you mean bremsstrahlung. What do you think is "soft quanta"? Why should a undefined process be dependent on muon mass?
Might be an interesting thread if you can actually communicate what the question actually is.
Sounds like you are asking about the bremsstrahlung (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bremsstrahlung) from accelerating muons. Look at the Larmor formula (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larmor_formula) for any non relativistic charged particle being accelerated.

Copernicus
2016-Apr-07, 04:19 AM
Short answer: No.
Long answer: What "breaking radiation, soft quanta, and muon mass"? By "breaking radiation", I assume you mean bremsstrahlung. What do you think is "soft quanta"? Why should a undefined process be dependent on muon mass?
Might be an interesting thread if you can actually communicate what the question actually is.
Sounds like you are asking about the bremsstrahlung (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bremsstrahlung) from accelerating muons. Look at the Larmor formula (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larmor_formula) for any non relativistic charged particle being accelerated.

I don't really know what soft quanta is either. It is a term used in Quantum Electrodynamics by Landau and Lif****z.

Reality Check
2016-Apr-07, 04:26 AM
Still need a explanation of what the actual question is, Copernicus.

Shaula
2016-Apr-07, 05:45 AM
Soft quanta are just ones for which the energy is much less than the rest mass energy equivalent of the associated particle or system. So for electrons they are the one with energies significantly lower than 511keV. I think it is a fairly archaic term simply referring to the relatively low energy/momentum interactions of a quantised system.

Copernicus
2016-Apr-07, 11:39 PM
Still need a explanation of what the actual question is, Copernicus.

What I was interested in, was considering whether bremsstrahlung radiation had anything to do with masses of particles.

Reality Check
2016-Apr-08, 12:08 AM
Easily answered then. Bremsstrahlung radiation is the result of the acceleration of charged particles. A given force will accelerate particles differently according to their mass (F=ma). So it does have something to do with their mass.

Copernicus
2016-Apr-08, 12:57 AM
Easily answered then. Bremsstrahlung radiation is the result of the acceleration of charged particles. A given force will accelerate particles differently according to their mass (F=ma). So it does have something to do with their mass.

Actually I was extrapolating a little and wondering, if within the nucleons, that a similar process to Bremstrahlung or Cherenkov radiation occurred and may have caused some type of resonance that caused mass.

Reality Check
2016-Apr-08, 01:11 AM
Wishful thinking about "some type of resonance" will never cause mass. Most of the mass of nucleons comes from the gauge bosons (gluons) between their interacting quarks. The mass of the gauge bosons comes from the Higgs mechanism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_mechanism).
Quark (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark#Mass)

For example, a proton has a mass of approximately 938 MeV/c2, of which the rest mass of its three valence quarks only contributes about 9 MeV/c2; much of the remainder can be attributed to the field energy of the gluons.[72][73]
The obvious flaws with the "extrapolation" is that the radiation should be detectable outside nucleons and is a loss of energy (and so mass).