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WaxRubiks
2016-Apr-12, 04:33 PM
Would all(most) the gas in the atmosphere condense and freeze on the dark side?

Noclevername
2016-Apr-12, 04:45 PM
Probably not. Air would circulate around the planet and carry heat with it. You would get tremendous winds in the upper atmosphere.

swampyankee
2016-Apr-12, 04:54 PM
There have been studies:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/12/full-atmosphere-ocean-model-of-a-rotationally-locked-exoplanet/
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/2/629.full
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/2/629.full

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/41/pdf;jsessionid=1A3EE732E4C653C7EF3D48C2AF7678D8.c2
http://climate-dynamics.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/tidally_locked.pdf

I think the conventional wisdom was, for a while, that circulation would cause the water to all freeze out on the darkside, followed by the CO2. With GCM models, this does not seem to happen.

John Mendenhall
2016-Apr-12, 07:23 PM
There have been studies:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/12/full-atmosphere-ocean-model-of-a-rotationally-locked-exoplanet/
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/2/629.full
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/2/629.full

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/41/pdf;jsessionid=1A3EE732E4C653C7EF3D48C2AF7678D8.c2
http://climate-dynamics.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/tidally_locked.pdf

I think the conventional wisdom was, for a while, that circulation would cause the water to all freeze out on the darkside, followed by the CO2. With GCM models, this does not seem to happen.

The links above are very good. Thank you.

WaxRubiks
2016-Apr-12, 09:39 PM
yes, thanks.

wd40
2016-Apr-12, 11:19 PM
Mercury (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_(planet)) is tidally locked to the Sun:

Mercury is tidally or gravitationally locked with the Sun in a 3:2 resonance, and rotates in a way that is unique in the Solar System. As seen relative to the fixed stars, it rotates on its axis exactly three times for every two revolutions it makes around the Sun. As seen from the Sun, in a frame of reference that rotates with the orbital motion, it appears to rotate only once every two Mercurian years. An observer on Mercury would therefore see only one day every two years.

Would a tidally locked Earth rotate even more uniquely?

Noclevername
2016-Apr-13, 05:58 PM
Would a tidally locked Earth rotate even more uniquely?

Since Earth has an atmosphere and hydrosphere and Mercury does not, Venus might be a better comparison to what Earth would do. In Venus' case, the heat-driven circulation of fluid mass has actually made it retrograde with a day longer than its year.