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ToSeek
2005-Feb-07, 04:47 PM
Mars Express 'divining rod' to deploy (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn6974)


A "divining rod" to search for underground water on Mars will be deployed on Europe's Mars Express spacecraft early this spring, after a year of delays. The new deployment date for the radar antenna - to be announced within days - is likely to fall in April 2005.

aurora
2005-Feb-07, 07:02 PM
I wish they wouldn't call it a divining rod, even set in quotes.

:evil:

A divining rod is pseudo-science, the sort of thing that Randi debunks.

Doodler
2005-Feb-07, 09:34 PM
The operating conditions that make the MARSIS work properly are pretty ridiculous. 28 minutes per orbit, with the caveat of working better in the dark...

harlequin
2005-Feb-08, 02:30 AM
Anyone know if this radar will examine the areas occupied by Spirit and Opportunity? Given the only 28 minutes per orbit and better at night, I not sure that they will have that opportunity. I would expect that the examination of the MER locations would give astronomers more insight than the non-MER location.

01101001
2005-Feb-10, 02:42 AM
ESA says (http://www.esa.int/export/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM42PXEM4E_0.html):


The European Space Agency has given the green light for the MARSIS radar on board its Mars Express spacecraft to be deployed during the first week of May.

ToSeek
2005-May-02, 04:26 PM
Mars Express Radar Boom to Be Deployed in May (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/marsis_deployed_may.html?2942005)


Mission controllers at the European Space Agency are now planning to deploy the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding instrument (MARSIS) on Mars Express in the first half of May. They delayed deploying the two 20-metre (65 foot) booms (and another, smaller boom) because simulations predicted that they could swing back and actually hit the spacecraft. They will put the spacecraft in a mode that will allow it to tumble freely while the deployment is performed to minimize risk to Mars Express.

01101001
2005-May-04, 11:53 PM
Mars Express Radar Boom to Be Deployed in May (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/marsis_deployed_may.html?2942005)

New Scientist breaking news: Mars Express to deploy 'divining rod' at last (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7334)

(Divining rod? Ptooey.)


The hunt for water on Mars is going underground with the long-awaited deployment of a "divining rod" antenna on Europe's Mars Express spacecraft. A 10-day deployment sequence began on Monday after more than a year of delays.
[...]
But if all goes well, the instrument will be tested for three weeks in a commissioning phase before starting to take scientific data in June 2005.

ToSeek
2005-May-06, 04:36 PM
Martian 'divining rod' deploys its first boom (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7351)


The first of three radar booms that will search for underground water on Mars has apparently deployed successfully aboard Europe's Mars Express spacecraft, despite fears that the boom would whip back and strike the craft. But the radar will not be functional until its twin deploys, an event currently scheduled for Sunday.

kucharek
2005-May-09, 01:43 PM
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMQGXY5D8E_0.html


Deployment of second MARSIS boom delayed

The deployment of the second antenna boom of the Mars Express Sub-Surface Sounding Radar Altimeter (MARSIS) science experiment has been delayed pending investigation of an anomaly found during deployment of the first antenna boom.
...
Mission controllers were able to determine that 12 of the 13 boom segments of Boom 1 were correctly locked into position. However, one of the final segments, possibly No. 10, had deployed but was not positively locked into position.

PatKelley
2005-May-11, 09:37 PM
Sunned it, and it works again.

Link to follow-= but all 13 segments deployed.

Added Link:
13th segment deployed (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMY3R5TI8E_0.html)

01101001
2005-Jun-08, 02:24 AM
Finally, ESA: Green light for the deployment of the second MARSIS boom (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMSL01DU8E_index_0.html)


Following in-depth analyses performed after the deployment of the first MARSIS antenna boom on board Mars Express, ESA has decided to proceed with the deployment of the second 20-metre antenna boom.

The full operation will be performed during a time frame starting 13 June and nominally ending on 21 June.

ToSeek
2005-Jun-15, 04:46 PM
Mars Express deploys second radar boom (http://www.newscientistspace.com/channel/solar-system/dn7523)


The second of two identical radar booms has been deployed on Europe's Mars Express spacecraft - but it is not yet clear if the operation was successful. If it was, the antenna could begin scouting for underground water on Mars within a week.

Mission managers in Darmstadt, Germany, deployed the 20-metre-long boom on 14 June at 1130 GMT. After a series of manoeuvres designed to warm the boom evenly in sunshine, the spacecraft reoriented itself towards Earth about two hours later and began beaming data to mission control.

frogesque
2005-Jun-15, 07:43 PM
I wonder if Mars Global Surveyor will be able to have another photo call?

01101001
2005-Jun-16, 08:49 PM
Success.

ESA News, June 16: Smooth deployment for second MARSIS antenna boom (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMT1T1DU8E_index_0.html)


The second 20-metre antenna boom of the MARSIS instrument on board Mars Express was successfully – and smoothly – deployed, confirmed today by the ground team at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre.
[...]
The third boom deployment, not considered critical because of its orientation and shorter length, will take place on 17 June 2005. It will be followed by further tests on the spacecraft and the MARSIS instrument for a few more days.

frogesque
2005-Jun-16, 09:03 PM
=D> =D> =D>

Yorkshireman
2005-Jun-17, 04:37 PM
Fantastic news! =D> Now we can have some data on the deep structure of the Martian permafrost. Exciting times.

John Kierein
2005-Jun-17, 06:00 PM
Underground cities will now show up on Hoagland's web site.

Nicolas
2005-Jun-17, 07:14 PM
again? :roll: :lol:


=D> for ESA!

ToSeek
2005-Jun-22, 05:39 PM
ESA Deploys Mars Express Radar Antennas (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/050622_marsexpess_update.html)


The three-pronged radar instrument aboard Europe's Mars Express satellite has been fully deployed and put through initial tests and is expected to start operations in July following a 10-day commissioning period, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced June 22.

publiusr
2005-Jun-22, 07:05 PM
I wish they wouldn't call it a divining rod, even set in quotes.

:evil:

A divining rod is pseudo-science, the sort of thing that Randi debunks.

My rods are detecting great hostility. Oh--they're pointed at me! #-o

ToSeek
2005-Jun-23, 04:33 PM
Going Underground, from Martian Orbit (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid= 1612&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)


On 4 July, when the commissioning operations end, MARSIS will start its nominal science observations. In the initial phase, it will operate in survey mode. It will make observations of the Martian globe's night-side. This is favourable to deep subsurface sounding, because during the night the ionosphere of Mars does not interfere with the lower-frequency signals needed by the instrument to penetrate the planet's surface, down to a depth of 5 kilometres.

Through to mid-July, the radar will look at all Martian longitudes between 30 S and 60 N latitude, in nadir pointing mode. This area, which includes the smooth northern plains, may have once contained large amounts of water.

The MARSIS operation altitudes are up to 800 kilometers for subsurface sounding and up to 1200 kilometers for studying the ionosphere. From mid-July, the orbit's closest approach point will enter the day-side of Mars and stay there until December. In this phase, using higher frequency radio waves, the instrument will continue shallow probing of the subsurface and start atmospheric sounding.

Karl
2005-Jun-23, 07:19 PM
MARSIS's ability to transmit radio waves in space was tried out for the first time on 19 June, when the instrument was switched on and performed a successful transmission test.

=D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D>

sarongsong
2005-Jun-24, 06:00 AM
June 23, 2005 (http://www.earthfiles.com/news/news.cfm?ID=926&category=Science)
"...the deep ground-penetrating radar on ESA's Mars Express Orbiter...was turned on for the first time at 3 p.m. Pacific..."

01101001
2005-Jun-24, 08:41 AM
Nature: Mars Exploration: Going Underground (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/doc.cfm?fobjectid=37207) (1 MB PDF)


[...] the Mars radars will be peering into terra that is mostly incognita. That makes their chances of penetrating the martian crust unpredictable. Some minerals with high metal content are good radar reflectors, and could prevent the radars from probing deep enough to find water.

Karl
2005-Jun-24, 01:40 PM
Nature: Mars Exploration: Going Underground (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/doc.cfm?fobjectid=37207) (1 MB PDF)


[...] the Mars radars will be peering into terra that is mostly incognita. That makes their chances of penetrating the martian crust unpredictable. Some minerals with high metal content are good radar reflectors, and could prevent the radars from probing deep enough to find water.

That's a different problem. The transmitter test had to work before they can do anything. :D

01101001
2005-Jun-24, 06:12 PM
That's a different problem. The transmitter test had to work before they can do anything.
Well, sure, it is different. It's a limitation of the tool, one I hadn't heard about. I've heard so many confident predictions that MARSIS would show there is underground water. Perhaps it cannot.

I guess we'll see. I'm sure it will nonetheles produce interesting data.

Graham2001
2005-Jun-29, 03:42 PM
Looks like they've started calibration (http://tinyurl.com/dndel). The first operational runs will be made shortly after the Deep Impact fireworks.

ToSeek
2005-Jun-29, 03:50 PM
I hope that the ESA releases results more promptly than they usually do.

Karl
2005-Jun-29, 04:31 PM
It's pretty much out of ESA's hands, they are waiting for news from Rome. First release needs to come from the PI group.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Jul-05, 07:36 PM
Underground cities will now show up on Hoagland's web site.

He's busy with his death-star Saturn conspiracy now

ToSeek
2005-Jul-27, 04:33 PM
Mars radar experiment returns cryptic data (http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn7738-mars-radar-experiment-returns-cryptic-data.html)


A radar experiment designed to scout for water deep below the Martian surface is sending back its first data - but scientists say it could take months to decipher.

Launch window
2005-Aug-05, 10:18 PM
Mars Express radar collects first surface data (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMQAN808BE_index_0.html)
The MARSIS radar is designed to operate around the orbit ‘pericentre’, when the spacecraft is closer to the planet’s surface. In each orbit, the radar has been switched on for 36 minutes around this point, dedicating the central 26 minutes to subsurface observations and the first and last five minutes of the slot to active ionosphere sounding.
http://www.marsis.com/index.php3?page=overview.php3

ToSeek
2005-Nov-30, 07:32 PM
Radar reveals ice deep below Martian surface (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn8397&feedId=online-news_rss20)


The first ever underground investigation of another planet has been performed by a radar antenna aboard Europe's Mars Express spacecraft. The instrument probed two kilometres below the Martian surface and found tantalising hints of liquid water pooling in a buried impact crater.

Carlos2006
2005-Dec-01, 12:34 AM
great news :) Here is some info from the esa website:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Results_from_Mars_Express_and_Huygens/

01101001
2006-Apr-12, 06:25 AM
JPL lecture: Radar Sounding of Mars: MARSIS on Mars Express (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures/apr06.cfm)


Presented by Dr. Jeffrey Plaut
Co-Principal Investigator, MARSIS Instrument, Mars Express Spacecraft

Thursday, April 13 The von Kármán Auditorium at JPL
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA

Friday, April 14 The Vosloh Forum at Pasadena City College
1570 East Colorado Blvd.
Pasadena, CA

Sigh. Both are said to start at 7 PM PST, but I suspect they meant 7 PM PDT, during daylight saving time. (Feedback has been registered.)

The Thursday, April 13 lecture will be webcast live (http://realserver1.jpl.nasa.gov:8080/ramgen/broadcast/live.rm?mode=compact) (RealPlayer).
1900 PST = 2200 EST = 0300 UTC (published)
1900 PDT = 2200 EDT = 0200 UTC (presumed)

antoniseb
2006-Apr-12, 01:40 PM
Thanks for posting this. The MARSIS data is potentially very interesting.
*Is* there a sea of ice on Mars?

Karl
2006-Apr-12, 02:42 PM
Maybe not a sea, but at least more than was known before.

http://www.newscientistspace.com/channel/solar-system/dn8857-big-new-reservoir-of-water-ice-suspected-under-mars.html

SHARAD on MRO might be able to resolve shallow deposits better, that's what it's designed for.

ToSeek
2008-Apr-17, 07:40 PM
Mars radar opens up a planet’s third dimension (http://www.physorg.com/news127658269.html)


ESA’s Mars Express radar sounder, MARSIS, has looked beneath the martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique’s success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders.