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blueshift
2016-Jun-26, 11:52 PM
Seeing is actually far more important than aperture when it comes to viewing the planets. A friend did an image of Mars with a 14 inch scope under one set of seeing conditions while using an ETX 125 in good seeing conditions. He recommends doing it at 3 AM when the atmosphere is likely most cooperative. So I took his suggestion and used my ETX 125 with a Mallincam Signature video camera and used Registax but no photo shop for the following images in good seeing conditions. Also notice that being near the meridian has more importance than being higher off the horizon. Jupiter doesn't look as detailed as Saturn and Mars. The only different thing I did was to take the images at 11 PM.

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Solfe
2016-Jun-27, 04:00 AM
I would love to do astro-photography, but lack the tools and the patience. Your images are excellent! Show me some more.

blueshift
2016-Jun-27, 12:23 PM
Thank you for the comment. Clear skies and equipment have to cooperate. RickJ puts up enough beautiful DSOs and he does much more work than I do to make them work out. I just use video (security type) cameras designed for video astronomy and take snap shots out of Amcap software. My images come in too bright for imaging while Rick's come in dim, allowing him to keep the stars round as he "grows" an image with incredibly accurate tracking and several exposures. I don't use a mount with such good tracking. Many imagers spend up to $15,000 on an Astro Physics mount and use a guide scope to follow one star while the mount corrects for the slightest errors. I use a $600 mount without a guide scope that can give me fits so I guess that is where my patience comes in, being challenged by cheap junk.

I do have to correct one thing I posted concerning Jupiter. Being high off the horizon is not more important than being at the meridian. The problem likely is my line of sight to Jupiter either from my home or from the location in Coral, Illinois where I took those pics. The tree line and a dense forest to the west was at least 35 degrees above the horizon while the tree line to the south was quite rarified, with farm land visible. The denser forest likely coughs up more gases to reduce seeing west of where we were while to the south there was very little in comparison, making seeing better where Mars and Saturn were.

Amber Robot
2016-Jun-27, 06:40 PM
Also notice that being near the meridian has more importance than being higher off the horizon.

Won't an object be at its highest position when it's at the meridian? At least for objects that aren't circumpolar.

grapes
2016-Jun-27, 09:19 PM
At least for objects that aren't circumpolar.
Even then, at the meridian, no?

blueshift
2016-Jun-27, 09:34 PM
Won't an object be at its highest position when it's at the meridian? At least for objects that aren't circumpolar.The object will be but Jupiter passes directly overhead in Chicago while Saturn and Mars do not. They are both south and my equipment must plunge through more atmosphere to see them, even when they are at the meridian. Jupiter was higher at the time and more directly overhead but only by a few degrees at this time of the year. At sunset tonight you will see it begin its nightly journey west of the meridian but still higher off the horizon than Mars or Saturn, provided you live at about the same latitude as Chicago. Now if you are way south then Saturn and Mars will be higher than Jupiter.

Amber Robot
2016-Jun-28, 05:39 PM
Even then, at the meridian, no?

A circumpolar object will be at the meridian two times, only one of which is it at its highest.