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geonuc
2016-Sep-01, 10:03 AM
Researchers have found evidence of microbial life dating back to 3700 million years ago, making it the oldest life yet found. Stromatolites were found in an early Archaean formation in Greenland. Previously, the acknowledged oldest life was 3480 myo stromatolites in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Beyond the science involved, I find it interesting that the oldest known type of organism is one that still exists today.

Reported in NYTimes; Published in Nature.


Until now, evidence for the oldest life on Earth focused on debated stable isotopic signatures of 3,800–3,700 million year (Myr)-old metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and minerals from the Isua supracrustal belt (ISB), southwest Greenland. Here we report evidence for ancient life from a newly exposed outcrop of 3,700-Myr-old metacarbonate rocks in the ISB that contain 1–4-cm-high stromatolites—macroscopically layered structures produced by microbial communities.

http://www.nature.com/articles/nature19355.epdf?referrer_access_token=5SjHoF5yoEg moagXYl7YDtRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0PBDDfPvpCw9WLgiasaW YlWm8fIIWweTa-4YshJIq7jJzLjIeRQ0m-C5R1N5frXBOC4ORQBTdaQknqJLLmbrerx5aK8CJ_U3Qln_-0TeVFHIC3kcFKpRDx0h-tRjmcjRKNRPSAtY46o9-AaCLfyjIjfrdarcZUnU2Ulj4-ktCP6JF4JwRbon8AsxwM2fDTVxxstCxeKovbBvUVV3--aRXtdTu-EGyHepvsAzwyIZsNnaR_C0IfVFwfgBJ_Lmimltdd_8YZyYWVh4 _Epb-uA-JTs2O0DtY-aA-bwCV2u6vlMfZH6f43PIG6_-DJPf9gMe1dhiRcreKgOHRkKWFqqKOFcYrQdRaglxUXuFg9e8-QQoQ%3D%3D&tracking_referrer=www.nytimes.com

John Mendenhall
2016-Sep-01, 11:30 AM
Good stuff. Thanks.

Ah, check link. No respone.

geonuc
2016-Sep-01, 12:51 PM
Good stuff. Thanks.

Ah, check link. No respone.
Not sure why it doesn't open for you. It does for me. The link is to the actual published letter in Nature, but you can go to Nature.com and read the article.

http://www.nature.com/news/claims-of-earth-s-oldest-fossils-tantalize-researchers-1.20506

Swift
2016-Sep-01, 04:39 PM
Here is a summary article (http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2016/09/scientists-find-37-billion-year-old-fossil-oldest-yet?et_cid=5511808&et_rid=54636800&location=top&et_cid=5511808&et_rid=54636800&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.laboratoryequipment.com%2f news%2f2016%2f09%2fscientists-find-37-billion-year-old-fossil-oldest-yet%3fet_cid%3d5511808%26et_rid%3d%%subscriberid%% %26location%3dtop) about the work from Laboratory Equipment magazine


Scientists have found what they think is the oldest fossil on Earth, a remnant of life from 3.7 billion years ago when Earth's skies were orange and its oceans green.

In a newly melted part of Greenland, Australian scientists found the leftover structure from a community of microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor, according to a study in Wednesday's journal Nature.

The discovery shows life may have formed quicker and easier than once thought, about half a billion years after Earth formed. And that may also give hope for life forming elsewhere, such as Mars, said study co-author Martin VanKranendonk of the University of New South Wales and director of the Australian Center for Astrobiology.