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parallaxicality
2017-Jan-07, 07:40 PM
I mean a normal daylight moon obviously, not an eclipse. I may be a doofus but I don't think I've ever observed them together.

glappkaeft
2017-Jan-07, 07:47 PM
It depends on what you mean by "in the same part of the sky".

parallaxicality
2017-Jan-07, 08:23 PM
Could I see them next to each other, or at least in the same field of view?

glappkaeft
2017-Jan-07, 08:40 PM
That clarification doesn't actually clarify much. Assuming you mean field of view of human vision, up to about 100° vertical/200° horisontal, that is very easy to do especially just after sunrise/before sunset.

Hornblower
2017-Jan-07, 08:40 PM
Could I see them next to each other, or at least in the same field of view?

That depends on how large a field of view you are considering. For the unaided eye it is most of the sky, and you can easily see a fat crescent several days from conjunction, while simultaneously seeing the Sun. In a typical binocular field of view, no way. The razor-thin crescent will be virtually invisible in the glare, and the Sun will be destructively bright.

01101001
2017-Jan-07, 11:54 PM
Bad Astronomy: The Newest New Moon (http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/07/09/astrophoto_incredibly_thin_crescent_moon_in_record _breaking_shot.html)


He shot it from his backyard near Paris on Monday at 07:14 UTC, when the Moon was a mere 4.4 degrees from the Sun.

An eyeball would not be able to ignore the brightness of the sun. But the crescent is there.

Ken G
2017-Jan-08, 12:12 AM
I mean a normal daylight moon obviously, not an eclipse. I may be a doofus but I don't think I've ever observed them together.
I recommend you look for yourself, but you will need to wait almost three weeks. Still, it should give you ample opportunity to see them both together in the same part of the sky.

John Mendenhall
2017-Jan-08, 04:14 AM
Annular solar eclipse.

Jens
2017-Jan-08, 04:48 AM
I mean a normal daylight moon obviously, not an eclipse. I may be a doofus but I don't think I've ever observed them together.

Repeating somewhat, but they are often in the sky at the same time. It's just that the moon isn't as obvious, as it just looks like a white slice against the very blue sky, while at night it is striking and easy to notice.

akeley
2017-Jan-09, 10:32 PM
I don't think I've ever observed them together.

That would make for a great conspiracy theory.

Swift
2017-Jan-09, 10:54 PM
Originally Posted by parallaxicality
I don't think I've ever observed them together.
That would make for a great conspiracy theory.

Or a poem....

The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright--
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done--
"It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!"

John Mendenhall
2017-Jan-09, 11:50 PM
Or a poem....

The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright--
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done--
"It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!"

Ah, Lewis Carroll ? :confused:

StupendousMan
2017-Jan-10, 12:21 AM
Lewis Caroll, indeed.

The Walrus and The Carpenter (https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/43914)

antoniseb
2017-Jan-10, 01:20 AM
You can try on August 21st.

grant hutchison
2017-Jan-10, 01:50 AM
Bad Astronomy: The Newest New Moon (http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/07/09/astrophoto_incredibly_thin_crescent_moon_in_record _breaking_shot.html)

An eyeball would not be able to ignore the brightness of the sun. But the crescent is there.That one was shot in infrared, which is less scattered than visible light - so probably not visible even if the glare of the sun were eliminated.

Grant Hutchison

Jeff Root
2017-Jan-10, 05:50 AM
Showing the crescent Moon and crescent Earth too close to the Sun
was a repeating error in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

But the Moon is easy to see when it is much less than a quarter, and
thus much less than a quarter of the way around the sky from the Sun.
I noticed it by chance about a week ago. I also noticed that the illusion
that the terminator is not exactly perpendicular to the direction to the
Sun is very weak at that phase. I looked for it but don't remember that
I could detect it. The whole long discussion about this illusion and
the illusion itself depend on the Sun and Moon both being visible at
the same time. Although the illusion doesn't kick in until they are
fairly widely separated, so maybe that doesn't count as "the same
part of the sky" by your reckoning.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jens
2017-Jan-10, 11:39 PM
Just luck I suppose, but yesterday when I left my office at just after 16:00, the sun was very low on the horizon, and across the sky the moon had risen in the east and it was nearly full. I could perhaps see them simultaneously but very peripherally!

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-11, 12:19 AM
I mean a normal daylight moon obviously, not an eclipse. I may be a doofus but I don't think I've ever observed them together.

Yes. This is the Moon as seen in the daytime.

https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5158/14342695461_e28658dc85.jpg

http://en.es-static.us/upl/2012/05/daytime_moon_italy_-Alessandro_Cailotto-300x215.jpg

https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/t/white-cloud-moon-blue-sky-background-daytime-41163693.jpg

Google 'crescent moon daytime' for a buttload of them.

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-11, 12:23 AM
What's also fun is seeing the dark side of the Moon. I saw it just last week.

http://www.lunarland.com/images/Earthshine.jpg

Jeff Root
2017-Jan-11, 08:02 AM
I noticed that New Years Eve, about 5:30 pm, when the sky was dark.
Even in the middle of the city, with street lights all around, I noticed the
Earthlit dark part of the Moon cradled by the bright crescent practically
the moment I saw it. I also saw bright Venus nearby, but failed to
notice the much dimmer Mars a little farther to the East.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

chornedsnorkack
2017-Jan-11, 05:44 PM
The brightness of disc of Sun drops appreciably within the nethermost few degrees of horizon, while the general brightness of sunlit sky declines more slowly. How close to Sun can crescent moon be seen while a part of Sunīs disc is visible beneath? Presumably it helps if the location of the crescent is exactly known and continuously followed in a brightening dawn - tracking Moon and Morningstar until they can no longer be resolved where they just were...

Ken G
2017-Jan-13, 06:30 AM
What's more, there can be considerable refraction by the Earth's atmosphere, leading for example to the green flash. Could one set the record for seeing both the Sun and Moon at the same time at their closest at the moment of a green flash? Which makes me think, wouldn't the best time to see a green flash, and know it was not an illusion, if one sees it at dawn rather than sunset? If so, could not one choose a suitable occasion with good conditions, watch the crescent Moon rise, and wait for the green flash? Shortly thereafter, the Sun's brightness might close down the pupil or create glare and make the crescent invisible, but it would have been visible for an instant there, along with the first light of the Sun proper, seen very close in the sky. But maybe not-- perhaps the red sky near the Sun at dawn is actually much brighter than the blue sky around the Sun later in the day, if the greater optical depth to scattering overwhelms the removal of the blue light. That's actually a good question-- which is brighter, say one degree from the Sun, the red sky at dawn or the blue sky later in the day? And if the former, one could always use red filters to remove the dawn sunlight and still see both the green flash and the crescent Moon, still with the naked eye. Now there's a picture for you.

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-15, 01:28 AM
I noticed that New Years Eve, about 5:30 pm, when the sky was dark.
...
I also saw bright Venus nearby

I saw it too. I was in Cuba.

I went out several nights to try to get a picture of Venus-shadow. A shadow cast by bright Venus.
But my camera doesn't have a 'bulb' setting.

Jens
2017-Jan-22, 12:38 AM
This morning I left my apartment at about 9:30, nice blue sky. It was pretty hard to find it, but I found the moon maybe 80 degrees or so from the sun. So clearly visible, but hard to spot if you're not looking for it.

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-22, 05:57 PM
I found the moon maybe 80 degrees or so from the sun.
Incidentally meaning you also saw the Moon waxing 80 degrees (almost half). ;)

grapes
2017-Jan-23, 08:07 PM
Incidentally meaning you also saw the Moon waxing 80 degrees (almost half). ;)
OK, I'm wondering about that. Third quarter was Jan 19, so anytime after that, the moon had to be more than 90 degrees from the sun.

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-23, 09:46 PM
Yup.

Jens
2017-Jan-23, 10:27 PM
OK, I'm wondering about that. Third quarter was Jan 19, so anytime after that, the moon had to be more than 90 degrees from the sun.

But isn't the moon getting closer to the sun? It looks that way to me. This morning it seemed even closer, not further. It was pretty much a slice. ..

DaveC426913
2017-Jan-24, 01:56 AM
But isn't the moon getting closer to the sun? It looks that way to me. This morning it seemed even closer, not further. It was pretty much a slice. ..

Right. Yes.

The full Moon was Jan 12, and the Moon was opposite the sun.
By Jan 19, it was three quarters full (well, half full :P) and 90 degrees from the sun
On Jan 27 it will be new and a mininum distance from the sun.

http://www.moongiant.com/phase/today/

Jens
2017-Jan-24, 02:10 AM
Right. Yes.

The full Moon was Jan 12, and the Moon was opposite the sun.
By Jan 19, it was three quarters full (well, half full :P) and 90 degrees from the sun
On Jan 27 it will be new and a mininum distance from the sun.

http://www.moongiant.com/phase/today/

Right, that sounds right to me. But Grapes said earlier:


OK, I'm wondering about that. Third quarter was Jan 19, so anytime after that, the moon had to be more than 90 degrees from the sun.


He wrote, "anytime after that, the moon had to be more than 90 degrees from the sun." But the moon is getting closer, not further. So why would it have to be more than 90 degrees from the sun on say January 25 or 26? The new moon is on January 28, so was Grapes saying that the moon will be more than 90 degrees from the sun during the new moon? It just seems completely contradictory to me, but maybe I'm misunderstanding something.