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George
2017-Jan-19, 04:36 PM
"A monster wave roils in the atmosphere of Venus. The Akatsuki orbiter team, under the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), recently revealed images of the huge bow-shaped wave in the upper atmosphere of Venus."

From here (http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/japans-akatsuki-spies-massive-wave-on-venus/).

Ara Pacis
2017-Jan-19, 06:09 PM
Surf's up!

Roger E. Moore
2017-Jan-19, 08:30 PM
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/Spacebound/2017/0116/What-s-causing-that-massive-wave-in-the-atmosphere-of-Venus

I dislike calling this thing a gravity wave, too confusing. However, yes, it is awesome. Wonder how Aphrodite Terra did that.

Roger E. Moore
2017-Jan-19, 08:37 PM
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=7276

This link helps. Maps of Venus with location names. Ticks me off that we can't terraform this thing. Yet.

eburacum45
2017-Jan-20, 03:56 PM
Venus might be colonisable, so long as we restrict ourselves to balloon-habitats at the 50km level. As Geoff Landis has indicated, that part of Venus' atmosphere is one of the most Earth-like environments in the Solar System. Breathable air is a lifting gas in Venus' atmosphere, which is a bonus.

But this wave worries me a bit; would the (hypothetical) balloon habitats have to ride up and over the bow wave, causing disruption (or at least, motion sickness?) inside the living area? How high is the wave, and how violent?

Ara Pacis
2017-Jan-20, 04:29 PM
Venus might be colonisable, so long as we restrict ourselves to balloon-habitats at the 50km level. As Geoff Landis has indicated, that part of Venus' atmosphere is one of the most Earth-like environments in the Solar System. Breathable air is a lifting gas in Venus' atmosphere, which is a bonus.

But this wave worries me a bit; would the (hypothetical) balloon habitats have to ride up and over the bow wave, causing disruption (or at least, motion sickness?) inside the living area? How high is the wave, and how violent?

We may have to learn to surf it and make floating habitats that can handle that acceleration.

George
2017-Jan-20, 08:38 PM
Venus might be colonisable, so long as we restrict ourselves to balloon-habitats at the 50km level. As Geoff Landis has indicated, that part of Venus' atmosphere is one of the most Earth-like environments in the Solar System. Breathable air is a lifting gas in Venus' atmosphere, which is a bonus.

But this wave worries me a bit; would the (hypothetical) balloon habitats have to ride up and over the bow wave, causing disruption (or at least, motion sickness?) inside the living area? How high is the wave, and how violent? Assming it's a transverse wave, it might just be an up and down affair, like a cork in the sea. Even the biggest swells can't be surfaced, though I did get lucky once in ridding one.

publiusr
2017-Jan-20, 09:25 PM
Venus might be colonisable, so long as we restrict ourselves to balloon-habitats at the 50km level. As Geoff Landis has indicated, that part of Venus' atmosphere is one of the most Earth-like environments in the Solar System. Breathable air is a lifting gas in Venus' atmosphere, which is a bonus.

But this wave worries me a bit; would the (hypothetical) balloon habitats have to ride up and over the bow wave, causing disruption (or at least, motion sickness?) inside the living area? How high is the wave, and how violent?

One way to find out:
http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/VAMP/Pages/default.aspx


Assming it's a transverse wave, it might just be an up and down affair, like a cork in the sea. Even the biggest swells can't be surfaced, though I did get lucky once in ridding one.

You may have to design airships to be vertical--so as to act as an atmospheric flip ship in that wave
http://www.ship-technology.com/projects/flip-ship/

"A 30ft wave enables FLIP to move three feet vertically in the water column."

A vertical design might also lend itself to other uses

Canis Lupus
2017-Jan-21, 02:19 AM
Venus might be colonisable, so long as we restrict ourselves to balloon-habitats at the 50km level. As Geoff Landis has indicated, that part of Venus' atmosphere is one of the most Earth-like environments in the Solar System. Breathable air is a lifting gas in Venus' atmosphere, which is a bonus.

But this wave worries me a bit; would the (hypothetical) balloon habitats have to ride up and over the bow wave, causing disruption (or at least, motion sickness?) inside the living area? How high is the wave, and how violent?

Why go to Venus with this set-up when you can go anywhere? It couldn't be for the view of the planet, there is none. There probably won't be any at the same level of gravity of Earth. The only other reason is to have the benefit of the gravity, but we already know how to simulate gravity in space with great and inspiring views without all the worry of competing with a nearby planet's gravity - a competition which if lost would mean certain death.

Squink
2017-Jan-22, 12:50 AM
Impact, volcano, or just a very breezy day?

Canis Lupus
2017-Jan-22, 09:40 PM
Impact, volcano, or just a very breezy day?

Lack of beer and coffee outlets would kill me straight away. I don't need to think beyond that.