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Centaur
2017-Jan-28, 05:44 PM
A penumbral lunar eclipse will be seen by many observers in the Americas during the evening of Friday 2017 FEB 10, and by Europeans during the middle of the night. The Earth’s penumbra is the outer fringe portion of its shadow. An astronaut on the Moon within the penumbra would be witnessing a partial solar eclipse.

Penumbral lunar eclipses are not as spectacular as total or partial lunar eclipses, and are often unnoticeable. But this one should be deep enough in the Earth’s shadow for observers to detect a darkening in the vicinity of the upper left limb of the Moon.

Below is a link to my Moon webpage. It includes a preview graphic for the eclipse as seen against an imaginary blue wall to make the shadow fully apparent. The predicted event timings are in CST (UT-6), but will occur at essentially the same real time for all observers experiencing nighttime. The depicted orientation and Moon altitudes are for an observer in Chicago.

Photos and descriptions of the eclipse would be welcome additions to this thread.

Link: http://www.CurtRenz.com/moon.html

Centaur
2017-Feb-10, 06:02 PM
Tonight's the night. :)

For those in Chicagoland, the Chicago Astronomer will be hosting a star party tonight: http://astronomer.proboards.com/thread/5329/1st-star-party-year-2017

Roger E. Moore
2017-Feb-11, 06:24 PM
Clear from SC but not impressive. Would still watch it again. :)

publiusr
2017-Feb-11, 08:02 PM
Missed it.

ngc3314
2017-Feb-12, 07:48 PM
A couple of shots done with cell phone and 120mm refractor at 22x. I've been experimenting with this setup for use in lab classes; it is especially nice for the Moon because my DSLR does not have a live-focus screen so trying to get sharp focus is a long process. If you move the image enough to trigger the phone autofocus, it often comes out nicely.

About as close to umbral as one of these could be and still miss. Don't think I could tell the difference visually. OTOH, my eclipse thinking has already zeroed in on August.

Ken G
2017-Feb-12, 08:27 PM
Those are nice pictures, for those who can appreciate what they mean. What worries me is the danger that penumbral eclipses do more harm than good for the general public's appreciation of astronomy! There was a big story that we'd have three amazing things at once, a lunar eclipse, a full Moon (imagine that), and a comet. But of course the eclipse is only penumbral, and the comet requires binoculars! So my guess is, most people that heard the story went out expecting to be thrilled by some cosmic display, and left saying "big whoop, all I saw was a Full Moon." Then next summer, when they are told there will be a total eclipse of the Sun they can drive to, they'll think "not this time buster, I got sucked in by the last eclipse hoopla."

slang
2017-Feb-12, 09:11 PM
[...], they'll think "not this time buster, I got sucked in by the last eclipse hoopla."

More for us. :)

Centaur
2017-Feb-12, 09:20 PM
Thanks for sharing your fine photos, ngc3314.

Unfortunately, you may be right, Ken G. Internet news sites need clicks to show their advertisers, so they blast us with hyperbolic headlines and articles. I tried to tone down my opening post here, even though the readers would be amateur astronomers who might have had some genuine interest. A fuzzy shadowing was visible on the Moon, as ngc2214's photo proves. But indeed it was not the type of thing that would excite much of the general public.

It would be nice if science news sites were different, but many are not. Among the most frequent Moon related oversells are SuperMoons. The general public cannot tell one of them apart from any other Full Moon, and those of us more expert here can't tell one SuperMoon from another occurring just 14 months later. Space.com was referring to the November SuperMoon as the biggest and brightest in decades. Actually, the two previous Full Moons were brighter due to being nearer to the ecliptic.

Ken G
2017-Feb-16, 08:03 PM
More for us. :)True enough!

Ken G
2017-Feb-16, 08:07 PM
It would be nice if science news sites were different, but many are not. Among the most frequent Moon related oversells are SuperMoons. The general public cannot tell one of them apart from any other Full Moon, and those of us more expert here can't tell one SuperMoon from another occurring just 14 months later. Space.com was referring to the November SuperMoon as the biggest and brightest in decades. Actually, the two previous Full Moons were brighter due to being nearer to the ecliptic.Not to mention the fact that the Moon always has a 2% larger angular size when it is overhead rather than on the horizon, so a lesser "supermoon" seen on overhead would be larger than one of those very impressive horizon pictures! And a lot of the images of Full Moons on the horizon you get on the web are photoshopped to increase the Moon's size anyway. So people really have no idea how large the Moon actually looks.