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Fraser
2017-Feb-18, 12:30 AM
Data collected over decades proves that Earth has another continent: Zealandia.
The post Earth Just Got A New Continent (http://www.universetoday.com/133487/earth-just-got-new-continent/) appeared first on Universe Today (http://www.universetoday.com).


More... (http://www.universetoday.com/133487/earth-just-got-new-continent/)

publiusr
2017-Feb-24, 09:53 PM
So that's Mu

Roger E. Moore
2017-Feb-25, 02:32 AM
Lemuria, for those in the know.

KaiYeves
2017-Feb-25, 04:48 AM
Lemuria was supposed to be in the Indian Ocean, not the Pacific-- the name comes from how it was proposed as the origin of the lemurs found both on Madagascar and the Indian Subcontinent. Mu is the mythical continent of the Pacific. (They have been confused in literature a few times and their names have sometimes been transposed, but I mean according to the original mid-19th-century woowoo.)

Roger E. Moore
2017-Feb-25, 11:14 AM
I meant the OTHER Lemuria.

grapes
2017-Feb-25, 11:17 AM
Alt-Lemuria? I'm not not liking it

geonuc
2017-Feb-25, 12:48 PM
The GSA article makes a fairly compelling case for considering Zealandia as a distinct continent using the criteria they set out. Whether the majority of geologists agree with those criteria is another matter. But it makes sense to me. I suppose the main objection is that it's hard to think of a chunk of crust 94% submerged as a continent.

publiusr
2017-Feb-25, 06:10 PM
But i hasn't cleared it's---ouch!

DonM435
2017-Feb-26, 02:02 AM
"Just got" a new continent? That must have happened swiftly!

Canis Lupus
2017-Feb-26, 03:33 AM
The GSA article makes a fairly compelling case for considering Zealandia as a distinct continent using the criteria they set out. Whether the majority of geologists agree with those criteria is another matter. But it makes sense to me. I suppose the main objection is that it's hard to think of a chunk of crust 94% submerged as a continent.

It's only a compelling case from a New Zealand point of view. T

The so-called new continent is really part of the Australian continent if one examines it close enough through XXXX eyes. It appears, therefore, in cold hard sober daylight to be an expansion of the Australian continent, engulfing New Zealand.

Australia has been planning to invade New Zealand for some time, particularly with the All-Blacks absolutely dominant in rugby. Geological reclassification of the pesky rugby island, annexing it to Australia, seems a far less violent of way taking care of the over the "ditch" rivalries - the ditch now a bridge.

Welcome to the Federation, New Zealand.

Extravoice
2017-Feb-27, 12:03 AM
Meh - the continents are just trying to keep up with the oceans.
http://geography.about.com/od/learnabouttheearth/a/fifthocean.htm

loglo
2017-Mar-07, 01:56 PM
It's only a compelling case from a New Zealand point of view. T

The so-called new continent is really part of the Australian continent if one examines it close enough through XXXX eyes. It appears, therefore, in cold hard sober daylight to be an expansion of the Australian continent, engulfing New Zealand.

Australia has been planning to invade New Zealand for some time, particularly with the All-Blacks absolutely dominant in rugby. Geological reclassification of the pesky rugby island, annexing it to Australia, seems a far less violent of way taking care of the over the "ditch" rivalries - the ditch now a bridge.

Welcome to the Federation, New Zealand.
No, it is defintely part of New Zealand. It is cold and wet! :D

CJSF
2017-Mar-07, 02:31 PM
To me it looks like the N/NW "boundary" is a little arbitrary and could be expanded enough to merge into Australia, so I don't see how it's really that "distinct".

CJSF

geonuc
2017-Mar-08, 10:28 AM
To me it looks like the N/NW "boundary" is a little arbitrary and could be expanded enough to merge into Australia, so I don't see how it's really that "distinct".

CJSF

If you read the paper, it's not arbitrary at all:


The edges of Australia and Zealandia continental crust approach to within 25 km across the Cato Trough (Fig. 2). The Cato Trough is 3600 m deep and floored by oceanic crust (Gaina et al., 1998; Exon et al., 2006). The Australian and Zealandian COBs here coincide with, and have been created by, the Cato Fracture Zone along which there has been ~150 km of dextral strike slip movement, linking Paleogene spreading centers in the Tasman and Coral seas (Fig. 2; Gaina et al., 1998). This spatial and tectonic separation, along with intervening oceanic crust, means that the Zealandia continental crust is physically separate from that of Australia. If the Cato Trough did not exist, then the content of this paper would be describing the scientific advance that the Australian continent was 4.9 Mkm2 larger than previously thought.

http://www.geosociety.org/gsatoday/archive/27/3/article/GSATG321A.1.htm