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Frogman8555
2017-Feb-26, 07:34 PM
Its magnetic i found it on a lake erie beach221392214022141

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Frogman8555
2017-Feb-26, 07:37 PM
221422214322144

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01101001
2017-Feb-27, 12:09 AM
Do you mean "meteorite"?

Edit: PS, welcome to CosmoQuest Forum.

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 12:24 AM
Do you mean "meteorite"?
Yes sorry

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Glutomoto
2017-Feb-27, 12:28 AM
hard to tell maybe this will help you decide

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/check-list.htm


also and expanded checklist

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/realities.htm


note point 41 - found on a beach

DaveC426913
2017-Feb-27, 04:08 AM
Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

22146

Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.

Noclevername
2017-Feb-27, 04:47 AM
Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

22146

Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.

OP says it's magnetic, so probably has a high iron content.

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 04:52 AM
Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

22146

Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.
Its to heavy to be a brick

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John Mendenhall
2017-Feb-27, 05:11 AM
OP says it's magnetic, so probably has a high iron content.

OP, how do you know it is magnetic?

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 02:23 PM
OP, how do you know it is magnetic?
A magnet sticks to it the red on it is rust

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Spacedude
2017-Feb-27, 03:12 PM
See if the reverse is true and if a needle or iron filings sticks to the stone.

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 05:36 PM
See if the reverse is true and if a needle or iron filings sticks to the stone.
No it doesnt attract metal.. i put a round refrigerator magnet on its side and the rock pulls it but its not a strong connection

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DaveC426913
2017-Feb-27, 06:42 PM
OK, so it's not magnetic; it's ferrous.

DaveC426913
2017-Feb-27, 06:48 PM
It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

1] Weigh it (in grams).
2] Measure its volume.
- Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
(A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
- Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
- Tie a string around the stone.
- Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
- Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
- Take the bucket out of the pan.
- Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
- Read the volume from the measuring cup.
- Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 07:18 PM
I dont have a scale besides a bathroom scale but id say it weighs about a pound maybe a little less and here is a few pictures compared to a penny 2214922150 22148

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Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 07:18 PM
It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

1] Weigh it (in grams).
2] Measure its volume.
- Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
(A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
- Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
- Tie a string around the stone.
- Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
- Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
- Take the bucket out of the pan.
- Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
- Read the volume from the measuring cup.
- Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3
221512215222153

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Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 07:53 PM
It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

1] Weigh it (in grams).
2] Measure its volume.
- Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
(A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
- Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
- Tie a string around the stone.
- Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
- Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
- Take the bucket out of the pan.
- Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
- Read the volume from the measuring cup.
- Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3
Its weight is 131 grams not sure on the volume

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PetersCreek
2017-Feb-27, 08:56 PM
Frogman8555,

I have deleted several duplicate posts. Please understand that as a new member, your posts are held in queue for moderator approval. This is primarily a spam control measure that will trouble you no more after your reached a certain post count. You don't have long to go.

DaveC426913
2017-Feb-27, 10:05 PM
Judging by the scale wrt the penny, I'll put its average diameter at 5.3cm.
This gives a volume of ~78cm3.
With a mass of 131g, that gives a density of about 1.7g/cm3.

22166

Glutomoto
2017-Feb-27, 10:16 PM
Hi Frogman,
What did you think of the self-test check-list and Some Meteorite Realities, links I sent in my earlier post? Is seems to me that, you are at the point in your inquiry where you will need to saw your rock in two or cut off a side with a tile saw, or you might try a streak test.

A type of rock that are often mistake for meteorites are those composed of iron oxides like hematite and magnetite because such rocks are denser than most common rocks. Hematite and magnetite can be recognized by the streak test. Scrap your rock against the unglazed side of a white ceramic tile or, the UNGLAZED bottom of a white coffee cup, or a toilet tank cover. Hematite and magnetite streaks are easy to make, almost like chalk on a sidewalk. Meteorites give NO streak or only a weak grayish streak, and only if you press hard. Absence of a streak does not indicate that the rock is a meteorite, since many terrestrial igneous rock will not give a streak.

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/streak.htm


Good luck and have fun.

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-27, 10:24 PM
Hi Frogman,
What did you think of the self-test check-list and Some Meteorite Realities, links I sent in my earlier post? Is seems to me that, you are at the point in your inquiry where you will need to saw your rock in two or cut off a side with a tile saw, or you might try a streak test.

A type of rock that are often mistake for meteorites are those composed of iron oxides like hematite and magnetite because such rocks are denser than most common rocks. Hematite and magnetite can be recognized by the streak test. Scrap your rock against the unglazed side of a white ceramic tile or, the UNGLAZED bottom of a white coffee cup, or a toilet tank cover. Hematite and magnetite streaks are easy to make, almost like chalk on a sidewalk. Meteorites give NO streak or only a weak grayish streak, and only if you press hard. Absence of a streak does not indicate that the rock is a meteorite, since many terrestrial igneous rock will not give a streak.

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/streak.htm


Good luck and have fun.
Thanks for the check list it.. it helped alot i tried the streak test and it didnt leave a mark im not sure where to go from here id like to cut it in half but i dont have the tools for thqt

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Glutomoto
2017-Feb-27, 10:38 PM
Perhaps someone you know, or a friend of a friend, does tile work and has a tile saw. Maybe you could use some very rough sand paper, a grinder or a mill file like one uses to sharpen blades.

speach
2017-Feb-27, 10:52 PM
It doesn't look like a meteorite too rough looking. Has the appearance of pink granite with inclusions of quartz.

slang
2017-Feb-28, 12:23 AM
[...] id like to cut it in half but i dont have the tools for that

Sounds like an awesome demonstration project for some high- or other school teacher. Know any? :)

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-28, 05:09 AM
It doesn't look like a meteorite too rough looking. Has the appearance of pink granite with inclusions of quartz.
The shiny specs look metalic the crust is rough but i filed a small spot down and its perfectly smooth there is no red on the rock besides rust its black and metalic underneath

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geonuc
2017-Feb-28, 11:51 AM
I would guess ferruginous sandstone (an iron ore). Possibly an arkose depending on feldspar content.

You may not want to do this but a geologist would take a hammer to the rock to examine an unweathered surface.

Which Lake Erie beach in particular?

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-28, 02:31 PM
I would guess ferruginous sandstone (an iron ore). Possibly an arkose depending on feldspar content.

You may not want to do this but a geologist would take a hammer to the rock to examine an unweathered surface.

Which Lake Erie beach in particular?
In the Cleveland ohio area it was burried pretty deep in the sand if that helps

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Trebuchet
2017-Feb-28, 03:29 PM
My guess would be a lump of highly corroded actual iron.

Frogman8555
2017-Feb-28, 03:36 PM
My guess would be a lump of highly corroded actual iron.
Wouldnt iron stick to a magnet more. i put a magnet on it and it falls right off, there is barley a attraction. its flat on the bottom and the top is egg shaped. I filed a small spot down the top layer turns to dust but underneath seems like solid metal almost and the file runs smooth across it

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Trebuchet
2017-Feb-28, 09:04 PM
Wouldnt iron stick to a magnet more. i put a magnet on it and it falls right off, there is barley a attraction. its flat on the bottom and the top is egg shaped. I filed a small spot down the top layer turns to dust but underneath seems like solid metal almost and the file runs smooth across it

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You're probably correct. Do you have a hacksaw?

Frogman8555
2017-Mar-01, 12:22 AM
You're probably correct. Do you have a hacksaw?
I have a swiss army knife with a saw... u may be right i read iron can lose its magnetism

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Glutomoto
2017-Mar-01, 03:15 AM
I have a swiss army knife with a saw... u may be right i read iron can lose its magnetism

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if the object you are putting a known good magnet onto does not attract the magnet, then it is not iron or nickle or other magnetic material.

I do not believe you are taking seriously the expert advice you have been given. The links I have provided have very good information, which you do not seem to care about.

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/realities.htm

NO, I am not the expert, but I have provided information from one.

I know you really want to believe the extra Terran nature of your find, I really understand that. I have found several rocks that I have was totally convinced must have been meteorites, only to find they were common rocks from my home world.

I do not think you will find your answer here, your rock is probably from Earth.. Take the object to an expert, there must be a university professor or even an avid rock hound somewhere near your location. Get on the ball and do the homework needed to find those people. You obviously have enough spare time to make postings on this forum, so you also have enough time to use the search engine of your choice to find someone local to you to answer your questions.


please excuse my harsh response.

thank you for your patience.
Glutomoto.

geonuc
2017-Mar-01, 11:25 AM
These folks may help you out:

http://geosurvey.ohiodnr.gov/major-topics/rock-identification

Frogman8555
2017-Mar-01, 06:46 PM
I have a swiss army knife with a saw... u may be right i read iron can lose its magnetism

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I found a hack saw i dont know if i had the wrong blade but it flattened the teeth on the saw and barely put a dent in the rock i may need a diamond blade

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Trebuchet
2017-Mar-01, 06:51 PM
if the object you are putting a known good magnet onto does not attract the magnet, then it is not iron or nickle or other magnetic material.



Many grades of stainless steel are non-magnetic. But they don't rust much either.

If there's a rock shop in the area, they may be able to help out, both with identification and cutting.

Frogman8555
2017-Mar-01, 06:54 PM
Many grades of stainless steel are non-magnetic. But they don't rust much either.

If there's a rock shop in the area, they may be able to help out, both with identification and cutting.
It is magnetic a little bit but not much

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Frogman8555
2017-Mar-01, 06:59 PM
It is magnetic a little bit but not much

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Im gonna try to find a expert in my area

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Glutomoto
2017-Mar-01, 08:55 PM
Im gonna try to find a expert in my area

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Good idea :)


also here is another good link to Meteorite Identification

https://xkcd.com/1723/


lol

Frogman8555
2017-Mar-02, 04:12 AM
It is magnetic a little bit but not much

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2218022181

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geonuc
2017-Mar-02, 10:01 AM
Im gonna try to find a expert in my area


Try the link I suggested in post 33. It's free, easy and those folks are experts in rock identification using photos.

publiusr
2017-Mar-03, 09:25 PM
Now, I wonder if it is a concretion
http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/concretions.htm