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Glom
2017-Mar-10, 07:12 PM
I just finished reading it and by reading it, I mean listening to it via Audible over many commutes.

I was very impressed. The story had a good pace to it, so it never felt bogged down. The fictional world was very established and rich. I really liked that lying, scheming Nessus. The story arc around Teela was very well done and really made the story feel like more than just a travelogue.

But the ringworld was the most impressive part. It wasn't just a setting, it was really well thought through. The eye storm was a great example of thinking through the implications. Coriolis force doesn't exist, but the thing whereby moving spinward increases gravity and moving antispinward decreases it does, so the storm has a horizontal axis.

Also, a great example was the fall of ringworld civilisation. The ringworld has more space than a civilisation could ever need, but it's all fake. There is nothing underneath the surface so when they need fresh material, their out of luck because there is none.

I'm waiting for my next credit to come in so I can get the next book in the series.

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-10, 07:24 PM
Well, Coriolis does exist (it has to, in any rotating reference frame). It's just that in that setting its a very small effect on the human scale, so it only shows up in large movements, like the "eye storm" you mention.

I agree it's a fun story, as are a lot of the stories Niven wrote in the Known Space universe round about that time.
Eventually he got trapped by too many improbable materials and too much outdated science.

Grant Hutchison

profloater
2017-Mar-10, 07:51 PM
My first rant in this forum was about Corioli's force. They seem to have become virtual forces due to rotating frames of reference but in our world they are real forces. The bullet in the rotating gun for example, the piston in a rotating cylinder, the ocean and atmosphere currents that have to change radius as they move north and get accelerated, the person on a child's roundabout who tries to move radially, real forces. The water in a rotating hose, many examples in real life.

swampyankee
2017-Mar-10, 09:12 PM
My first rant in this forum was about Corioli's force. They seem to have become virtual forces due to rotating frames of reference but in our world they are real forces. The bullet in the rotating gun for example, the piston in a rotating cylinder, the ocean and atmosphere currents that have to change radius as they move north and get accelerated, the person on a child's roundabout who tries to move radially, real forces. The water in a rotating hose, many examples in real life.

One of my college physics professors was rather dismissive of the "it's not a real force" argument around centrifugal force: his comment was something to the effect "it acts like a force, so it is a force." Of course, it only exists in non-inertial reference frames, but even then it's no less real than the force that's keeping us from traveling along the local geodesic in GR.

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-10, 09:35 PM
One of my college physics professors was rather dismissive of the "it's not a real force" argument around centrifugal force: his comment was something to the effect "it acts like a force, so it is a force." Of course, it only exists in non-inertial reference frames, but even then it's no less real than the force that's keeping us from traveling along the local geodesic in GR.Yes. And you never hear physics teachers claiming that gravity isn't a real force.

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-10, 09:36 PM
My first rant in this forum was about Corioli's force.Coriolis. That was his name.

Grant Hutchison

profloater
2017-Mar-10, 09:55 PM
Coriolis. That was his name.

Grant Hutchison
Thanks again, actually that was the blessed auto spell again, tends to put in an apostrophe every time. I tend to get tired of going back, in my haste.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Mar-10, 10:49 PM
Anybody who wants to read the Ringworld series should read World of Ptavs as a prequel.

Nowhere Man
2017-Mar-11, 12:13 AM
And Protector.

ETA: Actually, instead of World of Ptavvs.

Fred

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Mar-11, 12:53 AM
And Protector.

ETA: Actually, instead of World of Ptavvs.

FredWhen I'm too lazy to look something up I just post what I got and someone will come along. Many thanks. (I last read that book the year it came out.)

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-11, 01:41 AM
Thanks again, actually that was the blessed auto spell again, tends to put in an apostrophe every time. I tend to get tired of going back, in my haste.First thing I do with any new device that handles text is kill predictive text / autospell. A "labour saving" device that effectively doubles the length of time it takes me to type anything?
Dumbest. Invention. Ever.

You're in good company with Corioli's - Murray and Dermott's textbook Solar System Dynamics, published by Cambridge University, spells it that way a few times. How mad do you think they were when they found out? Pretty mad, I'd bet.

Grant Hutchison

DaveC426913
2017-Mar-11, 03:49 AM
And Protector.

ETA: Actually, instead of World of Ptavvs.

Fred

Indeed. I almost like Protector more than Ringworld. Almost.

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-11, 02:04 PM
I think as a specific intro to Ringworld, the short story collection Neutron Star does the job better than either Protector or World of Ptavvs - it introduces the puppeteers and kzinti, General Products hulls, the core explosion and the puppeteer exodus.

Grant Hutchison

Noclevername
2017-Mar-11, 02:30 PM
I would read Neutron Star before Ringworld, and Protector before The Ringworld Engineers, as both RW novels contain plot-relevant elements from the prior stories.

grant hutchison
2017-Mar-11, 03:11 PM
I would read Neutron Star before Ringworld, and Protector before The Ringworld Engineers, as both RW novels contain plot-relevant elements from the prior stories.Yes. Although Niven invented the Pak protectors before he wrote Ringworld, and they were the obvious explanation for the origin of the ringworld and its otherwise very mysteriously human inhabitants, he deliberately left the Pak out of the Ringworld narrative, which was already pretty complicated. The early novelette "The Adults" in which the Pak first appeared then formed part of the novel Protector, which was published after Ringworld - so when Niven decided to write a Ringworld sequel part of the motivation was to make the Ringworld-Protector connection more explicit.

Grant Hutchison

Strange
2017-Mar-11, 03:23 PM
You're in good company with Corioli's

Someone should write Captain Corioli's Mandarin; a new spin on an old story.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Mar-11, 03:47 PM
Someone should write Captain Corioli's Mandarin; a new spin on an old story.

22189

DaveC426913
2017-Mar-11, 04:53 PM
Yes. Although Niven invented the Pak protectors before he wrote Ringworld, and they were the obvious explanation for the origin of the ringworld and its otherwise very mysteriously human inhabitants, he deliberately left the Pak out of the Ringworld narrative, which was already pretty complicated. The early novelette "The Adults" in which the Pak first appeared then formed part of the novel Protector, which was published after Ringworld - so when Niven decided to write a Ringworld sequel part of the motivation was to make the Ringworld-Protector connection more explicit.

Has anyone followed up with the "- of Worlds" books? Fleet-, Juggler-, Destroyer-, Betrayer- and Fate-?

schlaugh
2017-Mar-11, 04:59 PM
Has anyone followed up with the "- of Worlds" books? Fleet-, Juggler-, Destroyer-, Betrayer- and Fate-?

I read them all and enjoyed them all. Think of the series as partial prequel to Ringworld and other stories. Plus some follow on to Ringworld itself. You'll re-meet familiar faces and gain a lot of backstory on the Puppeteers, the Fleet of Worlds, and much more.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

DaveC426913
2017-Mar-11, 05:02 PM
I read them all and enjoyed them all. Think of the series as prequel to Ringworld and other stories. You'll re-meet familiar faces and gain a lot of backstory on the Puppeteers, the Fleet of Worlds, and much more.


I read them; I just found them to a be a whirlwind of plot woven amongst the rest of Known Space.

I never did figure out why Carlos Wu lost his head.

Someday, I've got to go back and read it all over again.

Bearded One
2017-Mar-11, 10:40 PM
Has anyone followed up with the "- of Worlds" books? Fleet-, Juggler-, Destroyer-, Betrayer- and Fate-?I just started book 4. So far I'm enjoying them but I found book three, that involved the Pak, left me feeling a bit hollow. I couldn't quite "buy" the story.

NorthernDevo
2017-Mar-15, 02:37 AM
I never bothered to worry about plot or ongoing larger stories in Mr. Niven's universes; each story - either novel or short - was so thrilling and fun it was a joy to read as a stand-alone. Ringworld was pure cheesy thrilling fun - Speaker-To-Animals was hilarious, Nessus was intriguing, Teela was hot; all of them stuffed into a tremendous adventure the likes of which has been rarely seen before or since. I love almost everything Niven has written; I don't really care about continuity, scientific accuracy or even if it makes sense (Beowulf Schaeffer, my favourite Niven character, frequently gets himself into the weirdest problems); Nivens writing is so enjoyable it simply doesn't matter.

Thanks for the thread; I have to get Ringworld and World of Ptavvs again; haven't read them in a while. :D

Cheers!

Swift
2017-Mar-15, 02:57 AM
I would read Neutron Star before Ringworld, and Protector before The Ringworld Engineers, as both RW novels contain plot-relevant elements from the prior stories.
Yes.
I would strongly advocate reading a lot of Niven's short stories as a start.

And while some of the science may be dated, I think his stories hold up very well.

Glom
2017-Apr-24, 07:24 AM
And the Ringworld is saved.

I found the second book less good than the first. The excessive rashathraing was bordering on puerile. The middle of the book gets quite muddy with Louis Woo going from this city to that city, rashathraing this person and that person. I lost track of where and who before long.

I also found it bizarre that those water condensors, crippled by the superconductor plague, could be repaired by stringing a single strip of fresh superconductor between easily visible contacts.

I wasn't sure about the timeline. It's 23 years after the last book and in that time, Teela was able to make it from where she was near fist of god to the middle of the great ocean, find the repair centre, start taking tree of life and go through the change, identify the Ringworld's peril, figure out what to do about it and then get so much of it done.

I also kept wondering if the reason for the Ringworld being off centre was ever going to be attributed to the first expedition. I mean the fall of the cities was like 100,000 years ago and coincidentally, this cataclysm happens in the blink of an eye when outworlders visit.

Still, it was neat for Louis Woo to have an objective beyond just getting out and the twists and turns of figuring out what to do. It was genuinely cool when the big shock reveal happens and the resolution was quite an interesting dilemma.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-24, 11:35 AM
"rashathraing"? Google fails me.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-24, 11:40 AM
Rashathra-ing.
Rashathra being the act of having sex with another hominin species.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-24, 11:52 AM
Rashathra-ing.
Rashathra being the act of having sex with another hominin species.

Grant Hutchison
Thanks. Been a good long while since I read those. I'll have to re-read them as soon as Flux and Anchor series is done.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-24, 02:25 PM
I had the same reaction to the rashathra thing the first time I read the novel, but it kind of grew on me as one of Niven's trademark unexpected extrapolations from existing plot elements.
Bonobo diplomacy.

Grant Hutchison

Glom
2017-Apr-24, 04:56 PM
Unlike after the first one, I'm not in a rush to use my next Audible credit on the next one. I think I'll look at using it on something else.

Glom
2017-Apr-25, 12:28 PM
Pretty tragic at the end though. I can imagine how it would be portrayed if they ever did a film adaptation (I'm surprised no-one has yet). We would see our protagonists mournfully watching the cataclysm on a distant part of the ring. The music would convey solemnity but also beauty. Probably lots of strings, very legato.

Glom
2017-Apr-25, 01:05 PM
This ringworld instability.

With a Dyson Shell, gravity inside is neutral. This is because for any element of solid arc, the gravitational attraction is exactly opposed by the opposing element of solid arc. The element of mass of the shell subtended by that solid arc scales with the square of distance, but gravity scales inversely with the square of distance, so the forces balance out.

This means that a Dyson shell isn't stable, but it isn't exactly unstable. It's neutral. If perturbed, it will continue moving, but the movement won't be exacerbated like a ball rolling off the crest of a hill.

But in the case of a ring, does this apply?

The Ringworld is stable along the axis. If peturbed port or starboard (why the Ringworlders use those terms I don't know), it correct itself.

If peturbed radially, it will not correct. It's not in orbit. But does the shell theorem apply? The Ringworld is a million miles wide. If peturbed radially, the solid arc will indeed initally have the same effect, but eventually, as the far side moves further away, the solid arc will hit the edge of the ring. From that point on, increasing distance does not lead to increased mass both radially and circumferentially, but only the latter, so the element of mass starts to scale only with the distance and not the square of distance. This means the gravity diminishes with distance on the far side, while remaining unchanging on the near side. And so the net force on the Ringworld becomed greater and the structure accelerates into the Sun.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-25, 03:02 PM
The radial acceleration starts the moment the Ringworld moves even infinitesimally off-centre. You seem to be visualizing the shell theorem as if it involved solid angles of some given size, but what is actually going on is the integration of the balance of forces between infinitesimals.
You can imagine this by thinking that, as soon as one side of the Ringworld moves infinitesimally closer to the sun than the other side, there will be infinitesimal masses along the rim of that section which "see" nothing but empty space in the corresponding solid angle on the far side of the sun.

So it's dynamically unstable, like the colinear Lagrange points - you can bob things up and down at those points, at right angles to the plane of the orbit, but the slightest displacement within the orbital plane leads to runaway acceleration.

Grant Hutchison

Glom
2017-Apr-26, 01:22 PM
And the way to think about it is that when the ring moves closer on one side, the mass subtended by an element of solid arc decreases with decreasing distance squared, but out of plane arc that subtends mass at all increases with decreasing distance. So overall, that cancels one of the distance terms resulting in mass overall only decreasing linearly with decreasing distance. Hence, why with a ring, you view it as a two dimensional problem.

Though this is only where the width of the ring subtends a small angle anyway so low angle approximation applies.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-26, 10:24 PM
Integrating it, you can just draw the gravitational potential of a massive circular ring, and see what direction test masses will fall.
Here's a section taken in the plane of the ring and passing through its centre. The ring radius is 1 unit.
22279
You can see there are two gravity wells at radii of +1 and -1 (actually, of course, we're seeing one slice through a ring-shaped gravity well), with a broad central summit between them. Any object set down in the plane of the ring, either inside it or outside it, will fall down a gravity well towards the ring. The only exception is the dynamically unstable point at the dead centre of the broad summit. Stuff can hang around there for a long time, but eventually it will migrate into steeper parts of the ring's potential well, and hit the ring.
Now, in the case of a star, the less-massive ring will accelerate more towards the star than the star accelerates towards the ring, but the result is the same.

Grant Hutchison

swampyankee
2017-Apr-26, 10:42 PM
"Stable" has a well-defined meaning in control system theory, which is that it has a finite response to an impulse. See http://www.roymech.co.uk/Related/Control/Stability.html

Neither a [unitary] Dyson sphere nor a ring world are stable by the normal control system definition.

Bearded One
2017-Apr-27, 01:50 AM
"rashathraing"? Google fails me.It's actually spelled Rishathra.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-27, 02:45 AM
First time I read it I was amused to think so many different species were so ... compatible.

Has anybody else read a parody called "Molly Ringworld"?

swampyankee
2017-Apr-27, 08:44 AM
First time I read it I was amused to think so many different species were so ... compatible.

Has anybody else read a parody called "Molly Ringworld"?

Tell us more....

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-27, 04:38 PM
Here's a potential map for a massive ring.
22280

The section is at right angles to the ring plane, the centre of the ring is at the coordinate origin at lower left, and the ring itself as at the lower edge of the graph in the centre of the evident gravity well. So the coordinates are, in terms of ring radius R, from 0 to 1.5R vertically and horizontally.

You can see that no matter where you drop something, it will end up falling towards the ring. But at large distances out of the ring plane, it will accelerate towards the ring centre first, and only later experience acceleration towards the ring. It would be interesting to see if there are stable orbits threading the ring plane.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-27, 04:47 PM
Tell us more....

It had a pink cover, that's all I remember about it.

Jim
2017-Apr-27, 08:00 PM
It had a pink cover, that's all I remember about it.

I understand she is pretty in pink.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-27, 10:31 PM
I understand she is pretty in pink.

Hence the name. I put it back on the rack

swampyankee
2017-Apr-28, 02:13 AM
Hence the name. I put it back on the rack

Sounds like one of those movies where the budget for the women's costumes is nil.


Heading back to Ringworld, the required material properties are, if I remember, well beyond the strength of covalent bonds between molecules.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-28, 12:21 PM
Heading back to Ringworld, the required material properties are, if I remember, well beyond the strength of covalent bonds between molecules.Yes, we had a discussion about this before (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?152444-Tensile-strength-of-quot-scrith-quot). I figure the tensile strength of scrith needs to be about 6.5x107 GPa. Which is high, given that carbon nanotube comes in at 130 GPa.

Grant Hutchison

publiusr
2017-Apr-28, 10:43 PM
A favorite image of mine
http://yarr.me/c/1253/43/just-you-your-pal-and-the-ringworld.jpg

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-28, 11:07 PM
A favorite image of mine
http://yarr.me/c/1253/43/just-you-your-pal-and-the-ringworld.jpg

"I'm going to pee on ALL of that."

publiusr
2017-Apr-29, 04:44 PM
The arch is the world--and the world is the arch.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-29, 06:03 PM
A favorite image of mine
http://yarr.me/c/1253/43/just-you-your-pal-and-the-ringworld.jpgKind of spoiled by the dog. I hate it when dogs wander into a good shot.

Grant Hutchison

DaveC426913
2017-Apr-30, 05:19 AM
Kind of spoiled by the dog. I hate it when dogs wander into a good shot.

Grant Hutchison

Weird. That's not actually a renderig of Niven's Ringworld. No shadow square day/night bands, and just a leeeetle to close to a planet.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 10:20 AM
And no fisting.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 10:22 AM
Weird. That's not actually a renderig of Niven's Ringworld. No shadow square day/night bands, and just a leeeetle to close to a planet.

Better? https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/53/127507684_93b6a1510e_b.jpg

Glom
2017-Apr-30, 10:51 AM
Better? https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/53/127507684_93b6a1510e_b.jpg
All these renderings struggle to convey the scale. The Ringworld is 1,000,000 miles wide for Pak's sake.

Also that rendering seems to be the ring wall.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 11:35 AM
Also that rendering seems to be the ring wall.
Eh?

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-30, 01:33 PM
All these renderings struggle to convey the scale. The Ringworld is 1,000,000 miles wide for Pak's sake.Yes, if it were the Ringworld, those mountains would be tens of thousands of miles across, and tens of thousands of miles high - the dog would be well outside the atmosphere.
If that's a planet to the right, then I guess it's supposed to be an Iain M. Banks kind of ringworld - the size of a planet instead of a planetary orbit. But I have my doubts about its tidal stability in that case.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 03:17 PM
Yes, if it were the Ringworld, those mountains would be tens of thousands of miles across, and tens of thousands of miles high - the dog would be well outside the atmosphere.
If that's a planet to the right, then I guess it's supposed to be an Iain M. Banks kind of ringworld - the size of a planet instead of a planetary orbit. But I have my doubts about its tidal stability in that case.

Grant Hutchison
Why would it need to be thousands of miles high? To keep the atmosphere in you'd just need the rim walls high enough to contain a few hundred miles of atmosphere. The dog could be sitting on Fist of God?

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-30, 03:38 PM
Why would it need to be thousands of miles high? To keep the atmosphere in you'd just need the rim walls high enough to contain a few hundred miles of atmosphere. The dog could be sitting on Fist of God?Because the mountains occupy a significant fraction of the width of the ringworld (so tens of thousands of miles wide), and are drawn as mountains, which means their altitude is within an order of magnitude or so of their width. And the dog's looking down on them from an altitude considerably greater than their summits. The rim walls are 1000 miles high in the novel. Fist of God protrudes above the atmosphere, which is why it hasn't emptied the entirely atmosphere of the Ringworld into space.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 05:16 PM
Because the mountains occupy a significant fraction of the width of the ringworld (so tens of thousands of miles wide), and are drawn as mountains, which means their altitude is within an order of magnitude or so of their width. And the dog's looking down on them from an altitude considerably greater than their summits. The rim walls are 1000 miles high in the novel. Fist of God protrudes above the atmosphere, which is why it hasn't emptied the entirely atmosphere of the Ringworld into space.

Grant Hutchison
Gotcha. I though you were talking about the "actual" Ringworld. Artists seldom bother with little things like reality.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-30, 06:17 PM
Gotcha. I though you were talking about the "actual" Ringworld. Artists seldom bother with little things like reality.Yeah - I was agreeing with Glom that artists struggle to understand the scale of the "actual" Ringworld. If publiusr's image was of Niven's Ringworld, then the mountains in the foreground are bigger than the Earth, and the dog is dead.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 06:32 PM
Yeah - I was agreeing with Glom that artists struggle to understand the scale of the "actual" Ringworld. If publiusr's image was of Niven's Ringworld, then the mountains in the foreground are bigger than the Earth, and the dog is dead.

Grant Hutchison
He both alive and dead until Louis takes him for walkies.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-30, 07:40 PM
I used to go hillwalking with a guy who put is dog in every summit shot. New beautiful view, same scabby and overenthusiastic dog in the foreground.
It got so's the dog just went and sat in front of anyone who got a camera out.
"Uh, Jed, could you control your dog for a moment?"
"He's just being helpful!"
"He's being a nuisance, Jed."
"Let him be in your photograph! Where's the harm!"
"He's sitting on a bird nest I'm trying to photograph really quickly."
"Oh. OK."


I'm just glad he wasn't around when I had a chance at this once-in-a-lifetime (for me, at least) shot:
22287

Grant Hutchison

Glom
2017-Apr-30, 07:45 PM
Eh?
I meant to write that the rendering misses out the ring wall.

publiusr
2017-Apr-30, 07:51 PM
Finally!
https://pictures.abebooks.com/WHOLLYMOLY/13045307528_4.jpg

Look at the magazine image at this site:
https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=13045307528&searchurl=tn%3Dscience%2Bdigest%2Boctober%2B1982%2 Blost%2Btribes%26sortby%3D17%26an%3Ddegarmo%2Bscot t%2Bhal%2Bbowser%2Bkenneth%2Bs%2Br#&gid=1&pid=5

I have been looking for this for years.

Think a ringworld is big?

I give you the interior of a Dyson Megasphere:
https://pictures.abebooks.com/WHOLLYMOLY/13045307528_5.jpg

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 10:02 PM
Do the numbers here sound right, (http://www.enderra.com/2011/09/08/ringworld-data/) in regard to the dimension of Ringworld?

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-30, 10:37 PM
Do the numbers here sound right, (http://www.enderra.com/2011/09/08/ringworld-data/) in regard to the dimension of Ringworld?No, that's someone playing with their own version of a Banks Orbital.
You can find numbers lifted from Niven's work here (http://news.larryniven.net/concordance/content.asp?page=Ringworld%20Appendix#Params), on a site that Larry Niven (at least at some time) gave his blessing to.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Apr-30, 10:41 PM
No, that's someone playing with their own version of a Banks Orbital.
You can find numbers lifted from Niven's work here (http://news.larryniven.net/concordance/content.asp?page=Ringworld%20Appendix#Params), on a site that Larry Niven (at least at some time) gave his blessing to.

Grant Hutchison

Rooty!

schlaugh
2017-May-01, 12:23 PM
No, that's someone playing with their own version of a Banks Orbital.
You can find numbers lifted from Niven's work here (http://news.larryniven.net/concordance/content.asp?page=Ringworld%20Appendix#Params), on a site that Larry Niven (at least at some time) gave his blessing to.

Grant Hutchison

Nice. I had not seen that video until now. It looks a lot like a trailer. With current CGI technology filmmakers could do a fair job with at least the first RW story.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Noisy Rhysling
2017-May-01, 12:33 PM
Please don't wish for Whollyweird to get hold of a good scifi book.

grant hutchison
2017-May-01, 01:15 PM
Nice. I had not seen that video until now. It looks a lot like a trailer. With current CGI technology filmmakers could do a fair job with at least the first RW story. There were negotiations for a movie around the turn of the millennium - you can read the story, in telegraphic form, on the same website I linked to earlier, here (http://larryniven.net/ringworld_movie_news.shtml). It seems that Niven made some kind of premature announcement at an SF convention which leaked into the media and killed the deal.

Grant Hutchison

SkepticJ
2017-May-02, 01:18 PM
If they made Ringworld into a movie today, I'm sure they'd change some things, or the #Offended Crowd would crucify it. Don't believe me? Read the negative reviews of the novel on Goodreads.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-May-02, 01:26 PM
If they made Ringworld into a movie today, I'm sure they'd change some things, or the #Offended Crowd would crucify it. Don't believe me? Read the negative reviews of the novel on Goodreads.

It would be smarter to do it as written, that way they could cash in on the controversy. As for the complainers, some people would complain if you hung them with a new rope. "It's too stiff! It's prickly! It's going to leave a mark!" :yawn: