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TriangleMan
2005-Feb-21, 10:00 PM
Very carefully (http://www.cbc.ca/story/science/national/2005/02/17/wolverine050217.html). Actually I'm a bit surprised that this method was developed, I guess wolverines are really nasty to deal with.

Doodler
2005-Feb-21, 10:12 PM
I guess wolverines are really nasty to deal with.


That one deserves a spot in the World's Greatest Understatements listing... Those little buggers are a hair shy of psychotic.

LawBeefaroni
2005-Feb-21, 10:27 PM
Those little buggers are a hair shy of psychotic.
And they're only a hair shy because of the counting method:


When a hungry wolverine climbs the pole, traces of fur are snagged by the wire.

"It's fairly non-invasive, [with a] fairly limited impact on an animal," said biologist Robert Mulders. "It just brushes along and leaves some hair samples."

N C More
2005-Feb-22, 12:37 AM
Wolverines are extremely dangerous. They are actually the largest member of the weasel family in North America. They are ferocious predators and can kill a caribou or even a moose. A wolverine makes a badger look like a kitty cat. Basically, it would only take one of them to easily kill a human being. I wouldn't want to be the poor biologist assigned to tracking a population of these critters. The hair sample method seems to be the perfect solution.

Wolverine
2005-Feb-22, 01:14 AM
I remember reading this page (http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Gulo_gulo.html) a long time ago, thinking "maybe we should be grateful they don't have wings." :o


The Wolverine has a diet that can include anything from small eggs to full-sized deer. The wolverine is capable of bringing down prey that is five times bigger than itself. It is equipped with large claws and with pads on its feet that allow it to chase down prey in deep snow. Some prey species include reindeer, roe deer, wild sheep, and elk. The wolverine can be very swift when it is on the attack, reaching speeds of over thirty miles an hour.

Awesome creatures. 8)
But I'm sorta biased...

W.F. Tomba
2005-Feb-22, 01:27 AM
My question is, why would a solitary predator want to attack prey five times larger than itself?

sarongsong
2005-Feb-22, 01:34 AM
Scientific Name: Gulo gulo
Sounds like its prey's last words.

Captain Kidd
2005-Feb-22, 01:36 AM
First thought when seeing the title of this thread: very carefully

Now that I've learned, and remembered, more about wolverines: very, very carefully

N C More
2005-Feb-22, 01:51 AM
My question is, why would a solitary predator want to attack prey five times larger than itself?

Because they can.

They're also very, very hungry critters, there's nothing like a big meal. :D

Torsten
2005-Feb-22, 02:20 AM
It sounds similar to the way grizzly bear populations are studied (http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org/articles/07_00/snare_bear_hair.shtml).

I have encountered wolverines only twice in many years of doing field work in BC, and both times I happened to be in my vehicle. They have an unusual gait, and to my eye they had the appearance of "criminal deviants" as they ran off into the forest. Given their famous reputation, that could be prejudice on my part.

It's quite a contrast from several encounters I've had with lynx (http://www.wildcatconservation.org/cats/factsheets/northamerica/lynx/index.shtml). In those cases the cats' behaviour varied from only mildly curious about my presence to "studiously aloof". I stood about 15 m from one for several minutes some years ago, and we both quietly studied each other, until the cat showed its boredom with me by turning its head aside, letting out a big yawn, and sauntering off. Hmmm, kinda like that domestic cat that eats and sleeps at my house.

Doe, John
2005-Feb-22, 03:15 AM
Wolverines are rarely vocal, except for occasional grunts and growls when irritated.
Would hate to have been the person discovering this little factoid :)

Swift
2005-Feb-22, 03:47 AM
I guess the biologist, when they come back to get the count, would say "Hair today, gone tomorrow" :lol:

Eta C
2005-Feb-22, 04:49 AM
It's quite simple really. Just go to Ann Arbor Michigan on a Saturday afternoon in the fall and get a count of the ticket stubs.

space cadet
2005-Feb-23, 12:49 AM
"what did you do this summer, Napoleon?"

"I told you, I hunted wolverines in alaska with my uncle!"

"Did you shoot any?"

"Yeah, like friggin' fifty of them! They kept attacking my cousins; what would YOU have done?"

"What did you shoot them with?"

"A friggin' twelve gauge, GOSH!"

sarongsong
2005-Feb-23, 01:06 AM
7 (captures (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/research/ontmedia.htm)) the 'hard way'.

Lance
2005-Feb-23, 01:28 AM
7 (captures (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/research/ontmedia.htm)) the 'hard way'.

This one (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/graphics/F04R.jpg) doesn't look so vicious. They're kind of cute.

W.F. Tomba
2005-Feb-23, 01:33 AM
7 (captures (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/research/ontmedia.htm)) the 'hard way'.

This one (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/graphics/F04R.jpg) doesn't look so vicious. They're kind of cute.

Please Note: All wolverines shown being handled or held by field personnel are in an immobilized state

Wolverine
2005-Feb-23, 01:34 AM
Please Note: All wolverines shown being handled or held by field personnel are in an immobilized state

;)

Edit: Doh... beaten by the previous post.

TriangleMan
2005-Feb-23, 11:52 AM
7 (captures (http://www.wolverinefoundation.org/research/ontmedia.htm)) the 'hard way'.

For a second there I thought the link was going to be to wolverines sarongsong had captured. :)

Awwww, wolverines looks cute -- when they're immobilized.

sidmel
2005-Feb-23, 11:02 PM
Man, the CLAWS on those things. You know, I always thought the last cat I adopted was a wolverine instead...not anymore.

Nicolas
2005-Feb-23, 11:08 PM
The Dutch name for wolverine is "veelvraat".

This means "stuffs a lot"

Says enough about our cuty's eating habits, right?

N C More
2005-Feb-23, 11:19 PM
Pound for pound wolverines are the strongest mammal for their size. They are known for their voracious appetite and they aren't "picky" about what they will eat either. Sort of a "land shark" kind of critter. Oh, and they don't smell very good either, almost have a skunk like musk odor...charming huh?

Torsten
2005-Feb-24, 03:13 AM
The Dutch name for wolverine is "veelvraat".

This means "stuffs a lot"

In German it's "Vielfrass". Basically, it means glutton, which is another of its English names, and what the latin name means.

Manekineko
2005-Feb-24, 10:31 AM
The Dutch name for wolverine is "veelvraat".

This means "stuffs a lot"

In German it's "Vielfrass". Basically, it means glutton, which is another of its English names, and what the latin name means.
In Croatian, "Žderonja". Also means glutton... I suppose that's because it isn't native around here, so we just translated the official Latin name.

Nicolas
2005-Feb-24, 12:13 PM
"Veelvraat" and "Vielfrass" are exactly the same words (as you probably can see). I translated it by "stuffs a lot", but indeed "glutton" means the same thing and says it all in one word.

Swift
2005-Feb-24, 03:12 PM
Pound for pound wolverines are the strongest mammal for their size. They are known for their voracious appetite and they aren't "picky" about what they will eat either. Sort of a "land shark" kind of critter. Oh, and they don't smell very good either, almost have a skunk like musk odor...charming huh?
Any they wonder why us Buckeyes hate them so much? :lol:

The Rat
2005-Feb-25, 12:01 AM
Wolverines are extremely dangerous. They are actually the largest member of the weasel family in North America.

Make that - the largest member of the weasel family in the world. Think of them as our equivalent of the Tasmanian Devil.

But some varieties are bigger and meaner. Here's a Wolverine (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/forum//index.php?showtopic=4894) I made for the 'What if' modeling board! :lol:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v474/DaveBailey/wolverine10.jpg