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PetersCreek
2017-Apr-10, 04:56 PM
Ever been caught off guard by something totally unexpected that sent your heart rate through the roof? That happened to be yesterday. Big time.

I was in our home "office" doing some SketchUp work for a project and pretty absorbed in it at that. Then a bomb went off, so to speak. It sounded like a plane crashed into the house. I thought it might have been very close earthquake at first because the house shook so hard. But I heard clattering on the roof and knew what it was. Ice.

We had a still substantial remnant of an ice dam on the sunward side of the upper roof that was about 30 feet long and 8-10 inches thick in places. It gave way all at once and crashed on to the lower roof. About half of it then slid and fell onto the deck. Hard.

The was no damage but it took a while for the adrenaline dump to subside.

Jim
2017-Apr-10, 05:06 PM
I would argue that anything that scares you witless is by definition non-trivial.

danscope
2017-Apr-10, 06:45 PM
When it warms up a bit, have a look at the impact zone. Leaks are no fun. That's a lot of ice. Must have made a racket.

Buttercup
2017-Apr-10, 10:32 PM
Brought to mind a former online acquaintance, who had an overnight stay in a large city. He was awakened by a HUGE crashing sound. Immediately got up, threw aside the heavy hotel drape, to see a BRIGHT light -

- thought it was a nuclear event.

I can't recall what he said caused the crash, but the BRIGHT light was a nearby street light he'd forgotten about.

KaiYeves
2017-Apr-10, 10:36 PM
Brought to mind a former online acquaintance, who had an overnight stay in a large city. He was awakened by a HUGE crashing sound. Immediately got up, threw aside the heavy hotel drape, to see a BRIGHT light -

- thought it was a nuclear event.

I can't recall what he said caused the crash, but the BRIGHT light was a nearby street light he'd forgotten about.
I had a teacher who lived as a boy near the Grucci Fireworks Factory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fireworks_by_Grucci). In 1983, there was a huge explosion that destroyed the factory, created a shockwave that broke windows in the surrounding town, and produced a mushroom cloud. Everyone in his class assumed the worst and freaked out appropriately.

Noclevername
2017-Apr-10, 11:09 PM
I would argue that anything that scares you witless is by definition non-trivial.

Hear, hear. If someone drops dead of heart attack due to a harmless "cat scare", can it really be called harmless?

PetersCreek
2017-Apr-10, 11:37 PM
Is that the nit we're going to pick? This thread is about the kind of scares that turn out to be nothing or not much. If it was about the kind that people dropped dead from, I wouldn't be the OP.

Trebuchet
2017-Apr-10, 11:39 PM
The most frightened I've ever been was in my sleep. Some sort of dream or sleep terror. I've no idea what the subject of the fear was but I woke up my wife crying out. I was way more scared -- of nothing -- than when I fell off the roof, which was more of an "awshoot" moment and caused serious injuries.

Noclevername
2017-Apr-10, 11:56 PM
Is that the nit we're going to pick? This thread is about the kind of scares that turn out to be nothing or not much. If it was about the kind that people dropped dead from, I wouldn't be the OP.

Well, I was talking about the reactions, not the source of scare, but anyway...

Yeah, I've scared myself silly thinking I saw something move out of the corner of my eye, especially when I'm sleep deprived.

Buttercup
2017-Apr-10, 11:59 PM
I had a teacher who lived as a boy near the Grucci Fireworks Factory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fireworks_by_Grucci). In 1983, there was a huge explosion that destroyed the factory, created a shockwave that broke windows in the surrounding town, and produced a mushroom cloud. Everyone in his class assumed the worst and freaked out appropriately.

I can imagine! Especially in that "Cold War" era, when The Day After (Jason Robards) had been a TV movie event.

For my own personal Big Scare, it came at age 5. We (family) had arrived home from an afternoon out. The garage door wide open, and inside (hooked) is a gunny sack (filled with whatever - dad made it) hanging from a center beam (to be hooked onto a rope tied to a tree limb, to swing from). I ran for it, jumped on it ... and down came half the garage "attic area" stuff on me.

Dust, darkness, mother screaming and crying, rushed to the ER by frantic parents.

I was fine. :lol:

Solfe
2017-Apr-11, 12:16 AM
When my son was a toddler, he pulled a chair up to the counter in front of the toaster. Then he let out a horrifying scream. I ran over to see both his hands in the slots. I grabbed him and ripped the toaster off. It flew across the room and shattered.

Then the screaming really began: "I want toast!"

The actual problem was he slipped on the chair and his ankle went through the rungs on the back of the chair and he was stuck. He grabbed the toaster to keep the weight off his feet. It wasn't even plugged in.

Oh, boy.

NorthernDevo
2017-Apr-11, 12:48 AM
I remember when I was in the Army I went to my Dad's place for leave one autumn - I was probably about 20. One night when Dad was out, I watched the movie "Alien" on VHS at about 1 in the morning. Great film, loved it. As is my habit, I turned off all the lights and headed for bed - at that age I had excellent night vision and frequently walked around in the pitch-dark. I put my hand on the banister, put my foot on the bottom step of the stairs...and the cat chose exactly that moment to brush across my legs.

I didn't actually leave a hole in the ceiling but that's how I tell it 'cause it sounds funnier. :D

Noclevername
2017-Apr-11, 02:43 AM
When my son was a toddler, he pulled a chair up to the counter in front of the toaster. Then he let out a horrifying scream. I ran over to see both his hands in the slots. I grabbed him and ripped the toaster off. It flew across the room and shattered.

Then the screaming really began: "I want toast!"

The actual problem was he slipped on the chair and his ankle went through the rungs on the back of the chair and he was stuck. He grabbed the toaster to keep the weight off his feet. It wasn't even plugged in.

Oh, boy.

Again, sounds very non-trivial.

Noclevername
2017-Apr-11, 02:46 AM
Dreams. I've had scary dreams, but perhaps even worse are the dreams that seem perfectly fine up until the last fraction of a second when something sudden, weird and disturbing that I can't quite make out happens and I wake up jumping (or falling) out of bed.

DonM435
2017-Apr-11, 03:00 AM
Not too long ago, I mentioned how I was checking out our back yard post-hurricane. I was watching a long snake slither away when something dropped from the tree above me, bouncing off my head with a loud "plop."

But it all happened very fast, and I was able to note at once that it was just a rather plump lizard, who scrambled away.

Solfe
2017-Apr-11, 04:38 AM
I am a lucid dreamer. It is very rare for me to have either nightmares or dream of myself from an outside perspective. If I have a nightmare, I can simply wake up. This is unpleasant because I pretty much react like someone dumped a bucket of water on me. One moment I'm in bed, asleep and the next I am leaping out of bed. Addition unpleasantness comes from the fact that people aren't supposed to leap out of bed. I am usually sucking for air and hovering on the edge of passing out. If there is no nightmare, usually I can just sit up.

Needless to say, my wife hates this.

However, that is nothing when compared to when the exterior point of view meets nightmare. One time I had a series of dreams where there was something very malevolent chasing my wife and I. Having a point of view outside of my body allowed me to see this dark shape creeping up on us. Each time I changed the dream, the thing came back. On my final attempt to ditch this thing, I dreamed I was in Paris, on a patio on a summer day. My wife and I could see in every direction and the Eiffel Tower was visible in the distance.

This time when the malevolent thing attacked, she came in the form of a little girl dressed as Alice, from Alice in Wonderland. However, instead of sneaking she walked up to us and began to bark like a dog. It was slightly comical until the nightmare kicked into overdrive. Flames appeared on the horizon and raced inwards. When I decided to wake up the girl turn from me and my wife sitting at the table and advanced on my point of view, as if she could see me, the dreamer.

On waking, I shook for 15 minutes or so. Never been so scared in my life.

Noclevername
2017-Apr-11, 05:18 AM
Sleep paralysis? Not on my watch!

slang
2017-Apr-11, 09:36 AM
In the office, my back is towards the door. In our company (that provides care to elderly and special needs persons) clients visit us every morning with a list, to see who wants to order lunch in the cafeteria. One of those, a guy with Down Syndrome, finds enormous joy in sneaking up on me and scaring me witless by suddenly stamping down behind me and gripping my shoulder... my enormous gasp and musclespasming is not always acted...

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-11, 01:50 PM
The most frightened I've ever been was in my sleep. Some sort of dream or sleep terror. I've no idea what the subject of the fear was but I woke up my wife crying out. I was way more scared -- of nothing -- than when I fell off the roof, which was more of an "awshoot" moment and caused serious injuries.LIkewise. I've had one night terror in my life, during my early medical career, and I woke up to find myself running down the stairs - the only occasion on which I've had any kind of sleepwalking episode.
But during the most life-threatening episodes in my life - 1) falling forty-feet down a mountainside, 2) finding myself on the wrong end of a hunting rifle in a car-park in broad daylight - I can't recall feeling anything but 1) a sort of petulant annoyance, 2) an irritated incomprehension.

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-11, 04:15 PM
The worst fright I ever got in a professional capacity wasn't entirely trivial for the patient, but was actually good news for him given the possible alternative diagnoses.
A young man aged 13 or 14, who'd spent most of his life in rural Africa, but had been sent back to the UK by his parents to have his secondary education in a private boarding school. Referred to hospital by the local doctor for persistent diarrhoea and weight loss. In retrospect, he should have gone straight to the infectious diseases hospital up the road, but he ended up with the surgeons instead.
I was anaesthetizing him for a colonscopy, because a CT scan had showed up a mass at the start of his colon. After he was unconscious, I wanted to place a nasogastric tube. One technique for doing this is to pass the tube through the patient's nose, then gently reach two fingers into their pharynx to guide the tip of the tube directly into the oesophagus and to keep it straight while it's being advanced.

So I have my gloved fingers in this unconscious boy's mouth, feeling around for the tip of the tube when
[squeamish readers should look away now]
something about the diameter of a nasogastric tube passes between my fingers, crawls on to the palm of my hand, loops across the web of my thumb and then appears on the back of my hand - a long, white worm, the business end questing delicately in the air while it decided where to go next. My heart rate went up to about 180, purely driven by the unexpected alien unpleasantness of it all, and it was one of the hardest things I've ever done to ease that damn thing out of his mouth on the back of my hand, rather than just yank my hand away.
He had an infestation of Ascaris lumbricoides (https://web.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2005/Ascaris/JLora_ParaSite.htm) - the one I "recovered" was about twenty centimetres long. But I did then have the pleasure of being able to hold my glove up and say to the surgeon and scrub nurse, "I think I have your diagnosis. And could I have a moderately large specimen pot please, soon as you like?"

Grant Hutchison

PetersCreek
2017-Apr-11, 05:07 PM
Sleep paralysis? Not on my watch!

Sleep paralysis...ugh. It was a frequent occurrence in my youth and while it seems trivial in hindsight, it never seemed so at the moment no matter how many times I'd gone through it.


He had an infestation of Ascaris lumbricoides (https://web.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2005/Ascaris/JLora_ParaSite.htm) - the one I "recovered" was about twenty centimetres long.

That's a "keeper"! I encountered my first hognose snake (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hognose#Behavior) when I was about 7 years old or so. We surprised each other, resulting in it raising up, spreading its hood, and hissing quite loudly...and me running off while shouting "cobra!!!" I recovered fully and went on to later catch quite a few snakes.

Another wildlife related scare was on the roadway. It was an otherwise uneventful drive somewhere for something-or-other and I was only halfway listening to the radio when they played a station ID spot with the sound effect of what sounded like a fighter jet roaring low overhead. I think they crank the volume of promo spots up to grab your attention and this one did because at that moment, a bird suddenly flew through my field of view, perhaps only a couple of feet from the windshield. The synchronization was remarkable. For a brief moment, that bird actually sounded like it was jet powered and it startled the heck out of me.

Solfe
2017-Apr-11, 06:00 PM
Sleep paralysis? Not on my watch!

As near as I can tell, sleep paralysis is working just fine. In fact, I am very aware of it as it comes on. I find it pleasant, however, I also know I can simply wake up.

I am a little grey on the idea of asleep and awake, it probably affects my awareness of sleep paralysis. For example, when I go to sleep, I feel a profound relaxation over my whole body. It is pleasant, but I am also aware that if I move, it will stop and I will have to start all over again to go to sleep. This is probably more a relaxation technique that I instinctively do rather than the onset of sleep paralysis. I can't be sure because it stops if I move, which is sort of the opposite of paralysis.

When I am fully asleep and dreaming, there is a sort of lag when between deciding to move and actually moving. This feels different than when I am falling asleep, I can't control it. It seems to be just like anyone else. However I do seem to have full use of my faculties nearly instantly, whether I can move or not. Strangely, I can momentarily wake enough to hear and see very fast, and return to sleep just as quick. I retain a memory of it and can comprehend anything that I am told. Sometimes, I can rouse enough to talk but don't otherwise move. I sound like I am sleep talking, but can actually tell people that I am aware.

Jim
2017-Apr-11, 06:05 PM
This thread is about the kind of scares that turn out to be nothing or not much. If it was about the kind that people dropped dead from, I wouldn't be the OP.

Oh, I get your point. It's just that while afterwards the event may be trivial, it was not trivial at the moment you were scared witless. Or you wouldn't have been scared witless.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-11, 06:18 PM
As near as I can tell, sleep paralysis is working just fine. In fact, I am very aware of it as it comes on. I find it pleasant, however, I also know I can simply wake up. Not sleep paralysis. Sleep paralysis (http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Sleep-paralysis/Pages/Introduction.aspx) is when you wake up paralysed. Wide awake, can't move, horribly distressing.
I've experienced it a couple of times and was fortunate enough to know what it probably was, though I did wonder if I'd had a brain-stem stroke instead. Despite that, it brought a very basal level of animal fear with it. After a couple of minutes, I managed to make a whining noise that woke my wife, and as soon as she spoke the paralysis was gone. The neurologist Harold Klawans wrote about his own experience of it. As he lay paralysed, he could hear a radio playing a piece of classical music he knew and loved, and he began to sing along with it in his head, until at a crescendo in the music he was suddenly able to sit up and sing aloud.

Grant Hutchison

John Mendenhall
2017-Apr-11, 08:04 PM
(edit)
He had an infestation of Ascaris lumbricoides (https://web.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2005/Ascaris/JLora_ParaSite.htm) - the one I "recovered" was about twenty centimetres long. But I did then have the pleasure of being able to hold my glove up and say to the surgeon and scrub nurse, "I think I have your diagnosis. And could I have a moderately large specimen pot please, soon as you like?"

Grant Hutchison

Supreme coolheadednss !! Having 'found' the diagnosis, what dod you all do next?

NorthernDevo
2017-Apr-11, 08:22 PM
I was anaesthetizing him for a colonscopy, because a CT scan had showed up a mass at the start of his colon. After he was unconscious, I wanted to place a nasogastric tube. One technique for doing this is to pass the tube through the patient's nose, then gently reach two fingers into their pharynx to guide the tip of the tube directly into the oesophagus and to keep it straight while it's being advanced.
So I have my gloved fingers in this unconscious boy's mouth, feeling around for the tip of the tube when...
OK - that was freaky enough but...

[squeamish readers should look away now]
something about the diameter of a nasogastric tube passes between my fingers, crawls on to the palm of my hand, loops across the web of my thumb and then appears on the back of my hand - a long, white worm, the business end questing delicately in the air while it decided where to go next. My heart rate went up to about 180, purely driven by the unexpected alien unpleasantness of it all, and it was one of the hardest things I've ever done to ease that damn thing out of his mouth on the back of my hand, rather than just yank my hand away.
He had an infestation of Ascaris lumbricoides (https://web.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2005/Ascaris/JLora_ParaSite.htm) - the one I "recovered" was about twenty centimetres long. But I did then have the pleasure of being able to hold my glove up and say to the surgeon and scrub nurse, "I think I have your diagnosis. And could I have a moderately large specimen pot please, soon as you like?"
Aaaaaagh! OK I'm officially freaked out big time now...:eeek:
(Wince) I'm glad I had to deal with nothing worse in surgery (on the receiving end) than fairly serious physical damage; the thought of those things crawling around inside me would give me a King-Kong sized case of the heebie jeebies...(shudder)

Solfe
2017-Apr-11, 11:18 PM
So I have my gloved fingers in this unconscious boy's mouth, feeling around for the tip of the tube when ...

I would run, strip, shower, dress and leave. I would never come back.

Extravoice
2017-Apr-12, 01:06 AM
Early in my career, I was working for the US Army and had the opportunity to observe an exercise at Ft Lewis, Washington.
Somehow a co-worker and I got volunteered to babysit some experimental communications equipment overnight. The equipment was housed in a metal box on the back of a truck.
The box (officially called a shelter) had a door on the back, and could (barely) fit two people, along with the equipment.

The truck was on the side of a mountain, deep in the woods, and it was already night when we arrived.
Flashlights were disallowed, lest we divulge our position. (Ignore the generator that was attached to the truck, which could be heard for miles.)
Other equipment and tents were set up, but we couldn't make out much in the dark.

So, we sat inside the metal box for several hours; our only job was to click "reset" on an overly bright CRT monitor when instructed by someone on the other end of a walkie-talkie.
It was quiet, with the exception of the drone of the generator.

Then, suddenly there was a loud whistle and large explosion. The shelter shook violently. I'd thought the generator blew up; my co worker, having recently seen "Red Dawn" assumed something worse.
Deciding to not die by being cooked in a metal can, we threw open the shelter door and dove out.

Into nothing--
Total darkness, and total silence...except for the generator, which kept on running.

We later learned that someone played a joke on us by placing a "ground burst simulator" under the truck.
Video of a ground burst simulator: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kleFTJew2nE

Extravoice
2017-Apr-12, 01:13 AM
Same co-worker, different story.

One night, he was driving along the Garden State Parkway, and was getting really sleepy.
The next thing he knows, there are headlights just a few feet in front of his car, pointing directly at him.

It turns out he decided to pull into a rest area and take a nap. He parked head-on with another car in the parking lot.
After falling asleep, the owner of the other car came back from the coffee shop and started his car.

On the bright side, my co-worker was wide awake after that.

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-12, 01:24 PM
Supreme coolheadednss !! Having 'found' the diagnosis, what dod you all do next?Well, it's about the only time I've ever actually shivered with surprise and revulsion, and experienced a wave of actual horripilation.

The nurse refused to hold the specimen pot for me in case I dropped the worm on her, so I had to scrape it into the pot myself (against stiff resistance from the worm), with a small crowd of theatre staff gathering and exclaiming.
The surgeon went to phone the Infectious Diseases consultant on call, while I kept the boy asleep until we had a plan. The ID consultant got very excited, and told us to keep the worm until he could see it. (Like we had other plans for it.) We did the colonoscopy and could see a mass of worms protruding from the small bowel into the large bowel, and also did a gastroscopy, which discovered a few more worms thrashing around in the stomach. (The boy later admitted to having vomited up a couple of worms, but he had been too freaked out to talk about this.)
So he got a course of exotic anti-nematode drugs, and ... em ... expelled a mass of dead worms shortly afterwards. Job done.

Grant Hutchison

CJSF
2017-Apr-12, 01:35 PM
So, if the worm touched you, you could get infected that quickly? Or was it just typical revulsion?

CJSF

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-12, 01:44 PM
So, if the worm touched you, you could get infected that quickly? Or was it just typical revulsion?No, you only get infected by eating the eggs in contaminated food.
The worm was just an unexpected nine-inch worm crawling out of a boy's mouth and on to my hand. You don't see that every day.

Grant Hutchison

Extravoice
2017-Apr-12, 04:46 PM
Dude, if you're vomiting up worms, you should probably tell your doctor!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Noclevername
2017-Apr-12, 06:37 PM
So if sleep paralysis isn't what I thought it is, what is it called that (supposedly) keeps you from jumping up during a dream? And which I was apparently born without?

Extravoice
2017-Apr-12, 07:16 PM
I thought they were the same thing, just that the mechanism got stuck "on" when some people woke.

ETA: Without it, I figured that "rapid eye movement" sleep would be called "flailing limbs sleep".


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

CJSF
2017-Apr-12, 07:29 PM
REM atonia.

CJSF

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-12, 07:39 PM
Yes, REM Sleep Atonia is the normal paralysis that occurs during REM sleep.
Sleep paralysis is the persistence of REM Sleep Atonia on waking.
REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder is when REM Sleep Atonia doesn't occur during REM sleep, allowing people to act out their dreams.

Grant Hutchison

publiusr
2017-Apr-29, 05:07 PM
Not a worm but worm shaped--and in the sky--there passed a huge rotating roll cloud when I was younger.

Harmless--but this one seemed quite low.

BigDon
2017-Apr-29, 06:44 PM
Dang, how can I beat Dr. Grant's story?

3 AM in the Persian Gulf and we have a busy day ahead of us, with six full Alpha strikes scheduled that day starting a 6 AM. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_strike_(United_States_Navy)

That's a buttload of mayhem BTW and sort of scary in its own right.

Now the deck is crowded and birds are parked in unusual spots, like on the waist cats which is almost never done because...

Anybody every see a fully loaded A-6 Intruder? An A-6 is a carrier attack craft but it's also a *medium* bomber! All stores are external and when loaded with 500 pounders it can carry 32 of them!

That'll flatten a city block like nobody's business all by itself. Now add four squadrons of 12 birds each.

And the one parked over the steam catapults had a leaky drop tank.

Yep, it brewed up in flames. What are the odds?

And as the good Dr.Grant did, I experienced horripilation as well. Though I do take some pride in the fact that my first instinct was to run towards it. As in I was running before I realized I had given the signal to my feet to do so.

It was trivial in that we knew we had a full and vulnerable deck and had so many fire teams on stand by the fire was out before the bird got hot.

Still it was a bit disconcerting.

publiusr
2017-Apr-29, 07:37 PM
Bombs aren't as frisky as the Zuni rockets were on Forrestal at least.

BigDon
2017-Apr-29, 08:26 PM
Dang, wrote out five paragraphs then thought better of it.

Anywho...

Once, in a far away place, I was asked my opinion about something and ended up having a polite but very frank discussion with a man who I found out later to be a Columbian cocaine dealer, with, with! his full travelling "entourage" with him.

It was a non-formal event, in a garage no less, but still I kept wondering why this guy would turn to the crowd of guys watching us talk and speak harshly to them.

As it turned out he was telling his bodyguards that if anything bad happened to me he was going to take it personally. Then felt the need to repeat himself twice during the conversation.

It was one of those weird things where he found it refreshing to have an adult conversation with somebody who didn't know who he was, who had a differing opinion, where nothing got out of hand.

Boy, some of his men were looking at me with the bulgy eyes, the kind men get when they're ready to kill someone, but are still remaining quiet. I had seen this look before when I had cheesed off some on the run Irishmen during the Troubles so it was influencing me anyway.

I didn't go back there anymore after that. I didn't even go down that street anymore!

publiusr
2017-Apr-29, 08:32 PM
I imagine a coke dealer might have used a Navy man--the narco-subs running awash and such.

BigDon
2017-Apr-29, 08:35 PM
I imagine a coke dealer might have used a Navy man--the narco-subs running awash and such.

Whoa Pub!

I was a flightdeck sailor! The diametric opposite of a sewer pipe sailor!

grant hutchison
2017-Apr-29, 08:41 PM
I once anaesthized a guy who'd been shot in a local pub. He survived by a whisker.
I went down to the Intensive Care Unit to see how he was doing later in the week, to find a police guard outside the door, and two very large men in tight leisurewear in the room with him, who stood up and bulged at me as soon as I entered.
When I introduced myself (he'd been unconscious when I first met him), he said, "Thanks, doc. If you ever need anything done, just let me know." And he nodded seriously to his two giants, who nodded seriously at me.
Because I'm occasionally slow on the uptake, I'd actually opened my mouth to enquire, "And what is it you do?" before I realized the likely range of services that were on offer. So said, "You're very kind, thank you," instead, which I suspect was a first for all concerned.

Grant Hutchison

BigDon
2017-Apr-29, 09:44 PM
Alright, here's a small one that just now happened.

Was reading a recently resurrected post and conflated Astrotimer's name with Astromark's.

I was all "Ah man! What the hell did Astro do to get banned?!?"

publiusr
2017-Apr-30, 07:20 PM
"Thanks, doc. If you ever need anything done, just let me know."

Grant Hutchison

Yeah--there's this guy by the name of William Proxmire and...

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Apr-30, 08:10 PM
Alright, here's a small one that just now happened.

Was reading a recently resurrected post and conflated Astrotimer's name with Astromark's.

I was all "Ah man! What the hell did Astro do to get banned?!?"
Now don't scare me witless.

Hornblower
2017-May-03, 02:50 AM
Once while observing the stars in a very dark place, I thought I saw something moving about ten feet away. I turned on my flashlight and lo and behold, it was a skunk. I held my breath and sat very still, and the skunk wandered away, apparently unperturbed by the light. Another time, while observing outside my house, I was startled when a neighbor's cat snuggled up against me. It was solid charcoal gray, and practically invisible except for its eyes.

George
2017-May-03, 03:26 AM
Once while observing the stars in a very dark place, I thought I saw something moving about ten feet away. I turned on my flashlight and lo and behold, it was a skunk. I held my breath and sat very still, and the skunk wandered away, apparently unperturbed by the light. Another time, while observing outside my house, I was startled when a neighbor's cat snuggled up against me. It was solid charcoal gray, and practically invisible except for its eyes.
I too had quite an experience one night as I walked in the dark to my scope, and without a flashlight. I had the sense to hit the remote on my truck to give me a little light, thankfully, but I wish I would have not left my flashlight at the scope earlier.

22292

Trebuchet
2017-May-03, 03:40 AM
You found a snake being attacked by a tape measure? Don't trust those things, they've bitten my hand more than once.

KaiYeves
2017-May-03, 05:20 AM
Yeah--there's this guy by the name of William Proxmire and...

Holy cake, he works retroactively! What an assassin!

George
2017-May-03, 02:34 PM
You found a snake being attacked by a tape measure? Don't trust those things, they've bitten my hand more than once. The tape measure lost several inches from that experience; it was never the same.

BigDon
2017-May-03, 03:22 PM
I too had quite an experience one night as I walked in the dark to my scope, and without a flashlight. I had the sense to hit the remote on my truck to give me a little light, thankfully, but I wish I would have not left my flashlight at the scope earlier.

22292

George, I have to speak up here.

While I don't consider myself an outdoorsman, I was raised my whole life around people who were.

What did you use, a 4-10 to kill it?

You never want to shoot a rattlesnake in the head like you did there. You want to shoot it just behind the head. Why?

Do you know where that snakes fangs are now?

Betcha don't. Since the venom doesn't loose potency by drying, stepping on a loose fang can envenomate dogs and children, even days later.

After decapitating it you then bury the head deeper than your dogs are likely to dig as a snake's head can bite reflexively for hours after death.

But mainly you don't want to blow up their heads like that.

CJSF
2017-May-03, 04:21 PM
I hope the death of the snake was an accident, or else you had no other option. :-(

CJSF

PetersCreek
2017-May-03, 05:42 PM
Speaking of snakes: in local news, a 17-foot-long pet python is on the loose in the Mat-Su Valley. [KTVA News story (http://www.ktva.com/mat-su-look-17-foot-python-208/)] Me, I like snakes but The Wife most assuredly does not. She said if we lived in the Valley and had a yellow garden hose, she'd chop it up just to be sure. With our current temperatures, that python may be about as perky as a garden hose, too...if he's still alive.

BigDon
2017-May-04, 10:13 PM
I hope the death of the snake was an accident, or else you had no other option. :-(

CJSF

CJ, it's always best not to second guess a man if he chooses to kill a venomous snake on his own property. He knows his situation better than you or I ever will. :)

CJSF
2017-May-05, 01:04 AM
I understand where that sentiment comes from, but we'll have to agree to differing philosophies, Big guy! ;)

CJSF

closetgeek
2017-May-05, 03:33 PM
I was taking a shower on a weekday morning. When I closed my eyes to rinse the shampoo out of my hair, I, as far as I knew, was alone in the house. The rinse was finished and I opened my eyes, there was a 6 foot male figure with his face pressed against the shower glass door. My [now] ex husband was working in the area and stopped by the house. I didn't hear him come in. I am pretty sure that scare took years off my life. No, that is not the reason we divorced.

Buttercup
2017-May-05, 03:58 PM
I was taking a shower on a weekday morning. When I closed my eyes to rinse the shampoo out of my hair, I, as far as I knew, was alone in the house. The rinse was finished and I opened my eyes, there was a 6 foot male figure with his face pressed against the shower glass door. My [now] ex husband was working in the area and stopped by the house. I didn't hear him come in. I am pretty sure that scare took years off my life. No, that is not the reason we divorced.

That would totally scare me too! :(

BigDon
2017-May-05, 04:46 PM
Cj, no problem, it's what I do best. :)

Bc, Closet G,

That scares the crap out of me too when my brother comes home and I don't hear the garage door.

Had to warn him, "You know we own shotguns, right?" (:))

Trebuchet
2017-May-05, 09:10 PM
Didn't happen to me, but to one of my college roommates. He was driving home for spring break, on a two-lane road in Montana, in the dark. Came around a corner and saw a 40 foot tall green man standing there. The vision lasted only a moment, but far too long, he said.

What actually happened was that there was a little gas station and store on the roadside. It had a lighted sign on the roof, and another on a post by the road, at the same height. He came around and instead of two signs, his brain interpreted it as one sign with something obstructing part of it. What more logical obstruction could there be than a 40 foot green man?

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-May-05, 10:05 PM
One college room mate had something break on him while in the middle of an activity with a girl, he was second year university student and she was in high school. Every morning for a month there was call from her, I can almost understand why some people pray.

BigDon
2017-May-05, 10:17 PM
One college room mate had something break on him while in the middle of an activity with a girl, he was second year university student and she was in high school. Every morning for a month there was call from her, I can almost understand why some people pray.

Ah, the raincoat. Second in importance to a sailor only to the float coat.

closetgeek
2017-May-07, 04:01 PM
Cj, no problem, it's what I do best. :)

Bc, Closet G,

That scares the crap out of me too when my brother comes home and I don't hear the garage door.

Had to warn him, "You know we own shotguns, right?" (:))

Perhaps your brother should wear a cowbell, for his own safety.

Most of the time, especially out in public, I am oblivious. For some reason, in my own home, I have a habit of psyching myself out. Every common noise suddenly becomes an axe murderer, lurking in a dark corner, waiting to pounce.

BigDon
2017-Jul-05, 06:38 PM
So I go to add water to my pitcher plant's basin and a large wasp flew out and into my face.

And then I saw a moment later it was a mud dauber, the kindliest of the armed vespids. I immediately relaxed and felt silly.

They really like drinking out of that basin because I use deionized water. (That plant and the other carnivores only. All the flowers get tap water.)

I also seem to have good mud for daubing. Things are getting a lot less spidery too.

CJSF
2017-Jul-05, 07:16 PM
Mud dauber or no, and wasp lover or no, that would be REAL tough not to go into full-blown self-face-swatting panic! Nice, Don!

CJSF

reject
2017-Jul-05, 11:34 PM
CJ, it's always best not to second guess a man if he chooses to kill a venomous snake on his own property.

Or the snake's property.

BigDon
2017-Jul-06, 02:23 PM
Or the snake's property.

Dangerous vermin don't own property. Well, here on Earth.

Where are you from? :)

swampyankee
2017-Jul-06, 04:27 PM
Bridges. If I am looking over a long bridge's guard rail, I start having a not-so-mild anxiety attack.

Extravoice
2017-Jul-06, 04:47 PM
Bridges. If I am looking over a long bridge's guard rail, I start having a not-so-mild anxiety attack.

There is actually a service that will drive anxious people's cars across the Annapolis Bay bridge. It may not help those with general bridge anxiety, but is apparently useful for people who fear driving on the thing.


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