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Nitro
2017-Apr-28, 07:55 PM
The following forum is about mixed information I got from the website https://www.universetoday.com/. I'm posting it here because I can't post it on the official forum.

About an hour ago I was doing research about the surface of Saturn and the gravity on it in comparison to Earth. I've gotten many mixed answers on the internet however, I ultimately decided to go with the answer NASA gave out. "Metric: 10.4* m/s^2
English: 34.3 ft/s^2
By Comparison: If you weigh 100 pounds on Earth, you would weigh about 107 pounds on Saturn (at the equator). *Derived from a 1 bar radius of 60,268 km."1
I originally went with this website that said basically Saturn's surface gravity is 91% of Earths, so if I was 100 pounds on Earth, I'd be 91 pounds on Saturn.2&3
But another article on this same website agrees with what NASA said "Like Jupiter, Saturn is a huge gas giant that is significantly larger and more massive than Earth, but far less dense. In short, its mean radius is 58232±6 km (9.13 Earths), its mass is 5.6846×1026 kg (95.15 times as massive), and has a density of 0.687 g/cm^3. As a result, its surface gravity (again, measured from the top of its clouds) is just slightly more than Earth’s, which is 10.44 m/s² (or 1.065 g)."4
Just thought I'd put this out here because it's on the same website, and not consistent. One Author being Fraser Cain, the other being Matt Williams


1. https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/saturn/facts
2. https://www.universetoday.com/15323/gravity-on-saturn/
3. https://www.universetoday.com/24100/surface-of-saturn/
4. https://www.universetoday.com/35565/gravity-on-other-planets/

tony873004
2017-Apr-29, 12:02 AM
Saturn is not spherical. It is an oblate spheroid. Gravity is weaker at the equator than at the poles. This is also true of Earth, but to a lesser degree.
The range of gravity on Saturn takes it from just under Earth's gravity near the equator to just over Earth's gravity at the poles. It's interesting to note that at some latitude on Saturn its cloudtop gravity is 9.8 just like Earth. And at a lower latitude it is exactly 10.00, making homework easier for some of Saturn's inhabitants. g = 10 is no longer an approximation.

Centaur
2017-Apr-30, 12:41 AM
Saturn is not spherical. It is an oblate spheroid. Gravity is weaker at the equator than at the poles. This is also true of Earth, but to a lesser degree.
The range of gravity on Saturn takes it from just under Earth's gravity near the equator to just over Earth's gravity at the poles. It's interesting to note that at some latitude on Saturn its cloudtop gravity is 9.8 just like Earth. And at a lower latitude it is exactly 10.00, making homework easier for some of Saturn's inhabitants. g = 10 is no longer an approximation.

Interestingly the French committee that devised the metric system originally intended the length of a meter to be such that g = 10 m/sec/sec. However, they abandoned that criterion due to realization that it would not be true at all locations. That's mainly because of your observations about Earth's oblateness along with centrifugal considerations. So they resorted simply to their determination of 1/10,000,000 of the distance between the North Pole and the Equator.

Solfe
2017-Apr-30, 01:54 AM
The fastest way to contact an author is via Google+. If you circle Universe Today, invariably they answer within a couple of hours.