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Jim
2017-May-11, 11:27 AM
Well, a question about moving.

I've rented a truck to haul a few pieces of furniture and some boxes. I have relatives to help load, and it's all ground floor, but I hired a service (recommended by Penske, A+ BBB, insured) to unload ... 'cause they'll need to haul the old sofa and chair downstairs and the new ones upstairs.

Should I tip?

WaxRubiks
2017-May-11, 02:19 PM
A tippup truck sounds like it might damage the stuff.

Spacedude
2017-May-11, 02:35 PM
Not Big Don here, but I'd wait to see how well the movers completed their job before considering a tip.

eta - Jim, assuming the movers do a good job and it only involves a sofa exchange, a few chairs, and some boxes, and takes less than an hour I'd tip them enough for a lunch / mover.....at Arby's

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-May-11, 11:15 PM
U have helped delivers some furniture for the auction company I've worked for and if the job is done well tip,

BigDon
2017-May-12, 08:31 PM
Yes, tipping for a good job, no wall hits, no dings on the furniture, is looked forward to in a lot of cases. But not so much on short jobs unless there are technical issues. (Technical as in hoisting pianos in or out of a third floor window.)

BUT, since one tips after the job is over it will technically be irrelevant.

The examples of the few times I actually got butt hurt over no tip was things like myself and one other mover moving a lawyer's furnishings AND five and a half tons of books, down twelve flights of stairs, no elevator, in less than eight hours.

Doctors and lawyers as a class are almost ALWAYS a bit grueling to move because of the amount of books they own.

The best tippers were the NFL though. The bosses only sent hand picked trustworthy movers to these jobs and if the shippers liked your work output they nearly always tipped in cash more than you made working the job itself. They felt we were tremendously underpaid.

Swift
2017-May-15, 08:42 PM
<snip>
Doctors and lawyers as a class are almost ALWAYS a bit grueling to move because of the amount of books they own.

Sons of librarians are probably then the third worst. ;)

Though, I always thought the good thing about moving books was the odds of breaking them (as opposed to china or pianos) was low.

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-May-15, 08:46 PM
The worst in my opinion
1)Table saw in basement, had to take door off half thru moving
2)pull out sofas'
3)books

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-May-15, 08:51 PM
I love books to read.

DonM435
2017-May-16, 01:50 AM
Have you ever picked up a box of books? "Books" is the heaviest substance in the universe. Not lead, not platinum ... books.

Solfe
2017-May-16, 02:17 AM
If you have a mover who should put a sectional sofa in the living room, but it can't make it in the door and they tired for 3 minutes, and they leave it on the lawn, a fiver is enough right?

DukePaul
2017-May-16, 08:55 AM
We all own too much furniture. That is my tip of the day.

Trebuchet
2017-May-16, 02:29 PM
We all own too much furniture. That is my tip of the day.

And other stuff. We stopped at the storage unit in the old town yesterday to bring back stuff for the storage unit in the new town. Most of it appears* to be pictures. Half the stuff in the new unit is already pictures. I also noticed, but didn't bring, two boxes of college textbooks from nearly 50 years ago. I don't think I'm going to need those. Speaking of books, one box I brought is a 100-year-old encyclopedia set. I'm keeping that. I grew up with it.

*I was mostly just stuffing boxes in the back of the car, not paying a lot of attention to what was in them.

danscope
2017-May-16, 07:05 PM
Had to move my friend and his wife from Watertown to Quincy. Large diesel van w/air brakes. She is a book hoarder. Two of our friends were trying to move her hope chest into the house ,(chest locked). Seemed to way a ton. Our friend was from Dublin. I told them it was full of Irish soil , in which he liked to sleep in from time to time:) They broke up laughing! Later , we found out that it was chuck full of books!
----many.....many...pounds .

Dan

Swift
2017-May-16, 07:28 PM
Have you ever picked up a box of books? "Books" is the heaviest substance in the universe. Not lead, not platinum ... books.
Of course (I've picked up boxes of books). I've also handled lead sheets (x-ray protection) and platinum (though only in lab scale quantities). I helped move a giant slate lab bench once.

But that is also why I paid movers for my last move. And they didn't break any of the books, nor their backs (as far as I know).

Actually, they did a fantastic job. The most amazing was moving my model train table. I had removed all the loose items, but they still did a fantastic job in packing it and protecting it (a 4' x 8' table, that I smartly designed with removable legs). The only thing out of the whole move that did get broke was the glass on a single framed picture, and they reimbursed us the cost of fixing that.

And they were paid a good price for all of their work, and received a tip too, though I don't recall the amounts.

Spacedude
2017-May-16, 09:50 PM
Two of our friends were trying to move her hope chest into the house ,(chest locked). Seemed to way a ton....later we found out that it was chuck full of books!
----many.....many...pounds .

Similar experience here, had to remove some books. Might as well carry off a large tree trunk.

Trebuchet
2017-May-16, 10:05 PM
Similar experience here, had to remove some books. Might as well carry off a large tree truck.
Books are, after all, made of wood.

Spacedude
2017-May-16, 10:12 PM
I went out on a limb with my well hidden metaphor.

Jim
2017-May-17, 04:06 PM
Well, it's done.

I had family help me load the rental truck Saturday and drove it down Monday. (Sunday off for Mother's Day.) The two-man unloading crew came Tuesday. It took them less than the two hours minimum, and that included moving a sofa from an upstairs room to the garage (to be picked up by a charity later), move another sofa upstairs to replace that one, and unload the truck.

They did a great job, and I tipped them.

BigDon
2017-May-30, 06:49 PM
Oh, that wasn't hyperbole on the weight of her books. Back in the warehouse where we shifted from the local truck to the cross country truck we pulled the book boxes aside and weighed them.

That woman had five and a half tons of law books.

Somebody buy that woman a flash drive for Goodness Sakes!

BigDon
2017-May-30, 08:03 PM
Oh, books weigh on average 20 pounds per cubic foot. Book boxes are 1.5 cubic feet.

I used a hump strap and could carry four book boxes at a time, all damn day. Back when I was fifty-two that is. :)

Sometimes the load was so heavy I actually needed to be pushed to initiate forward movement.

Solfe
2017-Jun-08, 05:28 PM
I used to lug large boxes of toys and such around at TRU. One of my favorite questions when bringing out 110 lbs weight sets was "Is that heavy?". I always answered: "About 110 pounds". Never got old.

closetgeek
2017-Jun-14, 12:23 PM
I volunteer with a group that helps people in distress move on short notice. I don't flinch when I see elaborate bedroom sets, giant sectional couches, or solid wood dining room sets but, but when I see a massive book case surrounded by a bunch of small boxes my stomach drops to my knees.

BigDon
2017-Jun-14, 08:23 PM
Geek, I did get spoiled by both companies I moved for. Even in the "bad" outfit the salesmen wouldn't accept jobs in roach infested homes or, even worse, is what are referred to in the trade as "Dog *poop* homes". Ask anybody in the trade about that subject and they'll have horror stories for you. Some people aren't like you and I, you know.

I'm sure Mr. Geek as seen THAT at least once or twice. Oh, and good on you Mr. Geek for helping people caught up in VERY trying times like that. As Captain Malcolm Reynolds once said, "That's not nothin'!" Good on you again.

On the other hand I met a woman who thought having aquaria in one's kitchen was on par with having a pit toilet in same.

Humans are a spectrum. Furniture moving really showed me what a good humanity filter the process of boot camp is in the military. And I knew some absolutely hair raising weirdos in the service. In moving I met a guy who gave up his three children to the courts so he could be a full time heroin junkie. What a darksome fate.

And that was a driver!

(For a little while.)

closetgeek
2017-Jun-16, 05:36 PM
Thanks BD. It's something we enjoy doing, as a group. I don't want to get into details, out of respect, so the most I will say is, the only shocking experience was the very reason the individual was moving in such a hurry. We've been fairly fortunate on that aspect because we don't have the option to survey and decide if we are willing. A liaison contacts us on behalf of the individual. We don't know what we are getting into until we are in it.

No offense taken but I'm Mrs. Geek. Just a minor correction. :)

BigDon
2017-Jun-19, 06:14 PM
Thanks BD. It's something we enjoy doing, as a group. I don't want to get into details, out of respect, so the most I will say is, the only shocking experience was the very reason the individual was moving in such a hurry. We've been fairly fortunate on that aspect because we don't have the option to survey and decide if we are willing. A liaison contacts us on behalf of the individual. We don't know what we are getting into until we are in it.

No offense taken but I'm Mrs. Geek. Just a minor correction. :)

I guess I won't ask you if you've ever moved a reefer down a long flight of stairs by yourself with a hump strap though. :)

That's a trick I've only managed three times. And only under the direct supervision of guys who were masters at the use of hump straps.

For some reason I could never pull it off without one of them on the job and we'd have to go to the reefer dolly.

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-19, 07:43 PM
Bigdon I don't how you did day in and day out, after a couple of days I need a day or so to rest up.

closetgeek
2017-Jun-21, 01:12 PM
I guess I won't ask you if you've ever moved a reefer down a long flight of stairs by yourself with a hump strap though. :)

That's a trick I've only managed three times. And only under the direct supervision of guys who were masters at the use of hump straps.

For some reason I could never pull it off without one of them on the job and we'd have to go to the reefer dolly.

I had to look up both a reefer and hump straps. I am still not sure what a reefer is (in terms of household items, at least). I guess it's safe to say, no, I have not done that.

Ditto to what astrotimer posted. Our calls are not often. They seem to happen in clusters but it's one day with sometimes months in between. Our days are typically done before noon and then we grab some lunch, where we spend the next hour talking about our useful methods of pain relief.

Trebuchet
2017-Jun-21, 04:42 PM
I had to look up both a reefer and hump straps. I am still not sure what a reefer is (in terms of household items, at least). I guess it's safe to say, no, I have not done that.

Ditto to what astrotimer posted. Our calls are not often. They seem to happen in clusters but it's one day with sometimes months in between. Our days are typically done before noon and then we grab some lunch, where we spend the next hour talking about our useful methods of pain relief.

Refrigerator.

BigDon
2017-Jun-21, 04:46 PM
I had to look up both a reefer and hump straps. I am still not sure what a reefer is (in terms of household items, at least). I guess it's safe to say, no, I have not done that.

Ditto to what astrotimer posted. Our calls are not often. They seem to happen in clusters but it's one day with sometimes months in between. Our days are typically done before noon and then we grab some lunch, where we spend the next hour talking about our useful methods of pain relief.

A reefer is a refrigerator. A person strong enough to carry one on his back is much more maneuverable than a dollied refrigerator, hence the need to do that every once in a while, if possible.

A hump strap is a 30 foot, four inch wide doubled over strap of burlap. Fancier ones have the ends sewn to a rounded rope like shape and a cotton lining on one side that the newbs place against the piece and not their shoulder. I had to watch their use for about two years before I adopted one myself. You can carry all kinds of things...as long as they're mainly square or rectangular.

Which most household items are.

Plus it always makes line drivers, (cross country haulers), who haven't worked with you yet and are going to pay cash for your output, feel better when you pull a rolled up hump strap out of your kit bag.

As to fitness.

I had a weird start with my first outfit. I made a cardinal sin in being a new mover by stating out loud, "This isn't rocket science you know."

Once you say that, and a lot of people do unless clued in by friends ahead of time, all the other movers are required by unwritten bylaws to use every technique possible to make your day harder. A whole plethora of negative leverage techniques mainly. The older movers are allowed to refrain from doing this.

Most people will quit in two weeks to find something else to do. Me, I thought I was just out of shape. Since I've actually been through worse I unknowingly persevered for two months before the guys all had a pow-wow and decided to forgive me. I showed up, didn't embarrass them and was rather dependable. I did get lectured though. One of those, "If you're going to do this for any length of time this is what you have to know."

The main moving season is when the kids are out of school for the summer. Plus the weather is more conducive obviously.

Most moving outfits try to have other sources of income besides households. If they can find a dependable mover, furniture makers prefer to use us over having inhouse staff move the pieces between maker and wholesaler. And between wholesaler and retailer. Those are usually good gigs. All technical work and no PR show for stressed out housewives.

Hotel remodels use real movers over house staff because they can charge us for wall dings and other damage. Which happens a lot less when experienced furniture movers do the furniture moving.

So during "the season" it was easy to put in a fifty hour week, after I did one whole season, from the end of the spring rains to the beginning of November, I hit a level of fitness I'd never had before, even in the military. A low activity winter and the first two weeks of the new season is miserable but then you catch up. If you count apartments one could easily move 5 or 6 households a week once you were in shape and the season took off.

In the second outfit I worked for I made the overwinter crew, a sign that you've "made it". The run up to full moving condition is greatly reduced.

Side story time.

The owner of Benihana's restaurants had a five story three wing mansion with wings of equal size to the main house and was redecorating. So we would move the furnishings from the worked on wing to other parts of the house.

Memorable moment.

Some movers are idiots. It's why they move furniture, they can't do anything else.

I'm transiting the ground floor, along the back of the house, with a noted member of the above category when we enter a smallish room with glass French doors bracketed by two floor to ceiling windows. And what's on the other side?

A very enormous member of the Japanese bear-dog group. Unrestrained. I keep hearing different names for them so I'll leave it at that. Only he was big for one of *those*!

In this case I think they actually managed to cross one with a bear.

The knucklehead beside me puts on a talking to a baby voice and approaches the glass door. "Who's a big puppy? You are!"

I know dogs fairly well. This dog started at a rigid "I'm not amused" posture simply by our passing through this room. He rapidly progressed from initial surprise to the beginning of outrage when I found myself speaking very rapidly.

"Hey (Red Forman's favorite invective)! Where do you think you're at, the zoo? *That* window won't stop *that* dog!"

All in one breath.

"Oh. OH!"

The consensus among the crew was I should have just kept walking and pulled the door shut behind me. One of the guys who actively disliked the other guy added, "And braced it with a chair!"

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-21, 05:07 PM
Some movers are idiots. It's why they move furniture, they can't do anything else.
No never encountered that or any of their mistakes such as letting of a fire extinguisher in an enclosed space, broken furniture or scratched furniture.

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-21, 05:22 PM
About the leverage stuff it is much easier if you just tip the piece of furniture towards on person or the other, our biggest problem is usually getting wide pieces out a narrow door meant for on person.

DonM435
2017-Jun-21, 07:13 PM
"On person"? No, the idea is not to tip the furniture on any person!

;)

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-21, 07:48 PM
I meant towards one person.just not checking what I am typing.

DonM435
2017-Jun-21, 09:06 PM
So I assumed.

I really shouldn't pick on typos, but it's hard to resist when they turn out ironic.

Trebuchet
2017-Jun-22, 01:27 AM
I spent a summer in high school working for an office furniture store. Them dang steel desks can get heavy. Our delivery truck was about a 1952 Chevy panel thingy (this was in about '64). Sometimes it would start.

BigDon
2017-Jun-23, 04:24 PM
About the leverage stuff it is much easier if you just tip the piece of furniture towards one person or the other, our biggest problem is usually getting wide pieces out a narrow door meant for one person.

(Corrected typos in quote)

Actually it's only easier for one of you, that's why you don't do that. Plus it's obvious to somebody in their second season of moving. You let people get away with it if they're tired or not in condition yet, but you mention it if they do it more than a few time in a row.

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-23, 05:00 PM
It is the way the other guy prefers and he has been for about twenty years.

BigDon
2017-Jun-23, 05:02 PM
It is the way the other guy prefers and he has been for about twenty years.

Which though? Towards him or away from him?

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Jun-23, 05:08 PM
we mix it up, but he does 3 bad discs in his back, a bad shoulder and a bad knee. He keeps trying to get other employment but they can't find someone to replace him.