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View Full Version : Cleaning up temp file directories (XP)



Captain Kidd
2005-Feb-26, 01:55 AM
So I'm trying to figure out what all is clogging up my hard drive. I've come across the temp directory in Documents and Settings/<user>/Local Setting/Temp.

All users combined, there's almost 5gb of stuff. Can I wipe everything in it (including subdirectories) without fear of FUBARing something?

frogesque
2005-Feb-26, 03:11 AM
I haven't tried de-clogging XP yet so I'm glad you asked the question. I did it plenty of times on my old Win98 pc and the only real pain was that it dropped all my stored passwords for the likes of BA log in etc.

(Actually I think it's an IE thing rather than an O/S thing so if I'm correct XP shouldn't make any difference - could be wrong though)

Raptor1967
2005-Feb-26, 03:12 PM
there is a simple way to delete .tmp files from your system

run a dos prompt (click start - run type in cmd hit enter)

at the prompt type

del *.tmp /s

This will delete all tmp files from your drive including in the subdirectories. I do this all the time without any ill effects.
You can also use this to clean out any particular file type from your system.


*.log
*.bak
*.temp

As for removing temp folder yes you can delete them just be sure to leave to root folder in place.

Tip : if you have a highspeed internet connection reduce the cache that IE uses to the absolute minimum. You do not need this cache anymore.

sidmel
2005-Feb-28, 12:51 AM
The best way is to let the computer do the cleanup itself. Got to your Start Menu/Programs/Accessories/System/Disk Cleanup. It will go through your hard drive and pull out anything that is not needed. It will also archive rarely used files and free up space. It will take a while if you have not done this in a while or at all. Probably anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour or longer depending on hard drive size. Once you're through with that, in the same directory, I would select Disk Defragmenter to fine tune the hard drive a bit.

Something else you can do to clean out unneaded files on your drive to run a search: Start Menu/Search. Type in *.cab, this will pull up a pretty large number of instal files that you no longer need. Programs use them as a reference for driver and other information when you instal new programs or update Windows. You can delete all of these.

Another way to clean up your drive if you surf a lot of the internet is in your browser. In Internet Explore, if you go to Tools/Internet Options, you have a selections to delete cookies and delete files. I do this about once every two weeks, it can amount up to quite a bit of space. The clean disk funtion may get all of these, but depending on how your system is set up sometimes it may not.

jt-3d
2005-Feb-28, 06:35 AM
I think windows recovery uses cab files. If you delete those you can't restore your system to factory new. At least if you have an HP box.

mickal555
2005-Feb-28, 07:20 AM
I think windows recovery uses cab files. If you delete those you can't restore your system to factory new. At least if you have an HP box.
Oh, so what should I do? :-?

jt-3d
2005-Feb-28, 08:14 AM
Well, as far as I know everything sidmel told you is ok. I just wouldn't be too hasty deleting cab files if they're in a folder called 'recovery' or something like that. So be careful deleting cab files.

As far as the temp folder, you should be ok deleting everything in that. I've never had problems after deleting stuff from any folder called 'temp'.

mid
2005-Feb-28, 10:29 AM
*.log

I know of at least two enterprise-class applications that have info in files that have the .log extension that you shouldn't delete. Generally, don't delete files if you don't know what they're for.

Raptor1967
2005-Feb-28, 04:44 PM
I wouldn't delete any .cab files unless you know exactly what they are for. Windows stores updates and other essentials in these file types that you should not be deleting.

Enterprise apps that store info in a .log file. That is strange. By definition a .log file is for log info. There should not be anything important in them unless you are monitoring the operation of a particular application. In this case I would assume that we ae dealing with a home machine and I wouldn't think he had any need to be examing log files at this point.

as for using the drive cleanup wizard. It does a poor job at best but is a good place to start.

Also do a search for .zip and .rar files you will be surprised at how much space can be taken up by old downloads that you have forgotten about.

and finally defrag your drive after cleanup using a good defragger like diskkeeper. A boot time directory conslidation/defrag wouldn't hurt. either.

mid
2005-Feb-28, 04:47 PM
It's very rare, and both said apps have stopped doing it in more recent versions. I was just using them as examples - take the extra few seconds to see what they're there for before you hit delete...

sidmel
2005-Feb-28, 04:53 PM
Sorry, I should have specified a bit more on the cab files. I would make sure the company sent a recovery disk with you computer before deleting them. All the cab files will be located on that as well. I've personally never ran across an instance where I needed a cab file stored on the hard drive. Usually, if gets to that point, it's better and easier to reinstall the OS from your recovery disk.

tessa123
2014-Apr-25, 03:43 AM
The best way is to let the computer do the cleanup itself. Got to your Start Menu/Programs/Accessories/System/Disk Cleanup. It will go through your hard drive and pull out anything that is not needed. It will also archive rarely used files and free disk cleanup (http://www.mindgems.com/info/Disk-Cleanup.html) space. It will take a while if you have not done this in a while or at all. Probably anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour or longer depending on hard drive size. Once you're through with that, in the same directory, I would select Disk Defragmenter to fine tune the hard drive a bit.

Something else you can do to clean out unneaded files on your drive to run a search: Start Menu/Search. Type in *.cab, this will pull up a pretty large number of instal files that you no longer need. Programs use them as a reference for driver and other information when you instal new programs or update Windows. You can delete all of these.

Another way to clean up your drive if you surf a lot of the internet is in your browser. In Internet Explore, if you go to Tools/Internet Options, you have a selections to delete cookies and delete files. I do this about once every two weeks, it can amount up to quite a bit of space. The clean disk funtion may get all of these, but depending on how your system is set up sometimes it may not.

Any chance we can automate this with 3rd party disk cleanup tools?