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View Full Version : Waterline on the Sphinx?



Captain Kidd
2005-Feb-27, 02:56 AM
OK, I've been hit by a claim that the Sphinx and pyramids have a waterline on them. The only thing I can find on the internet is a woo-woo site (http://www.fortunecity.com/tinpan/trumpetavenue/134/earth1.htm). They got their lost continents wrong too. It's Mu that was in the Pacific. Lemura was in the Indian Ocean.

Anyways that's not the issue at hand. Something strikes me as not right with the waterline on the Sphinx claim, espeically being unable to find something on it.

Can anybody provide me sources/information? (Of course there's not going to be studies on why there's no waterline if there's not reason for any.)

Sam5
2005-Feb-27, 03:43 AM
OK, I've been hit by a claim that the Sphinx and pyramids have a waterline on them. The only thing I can find on the internet is a woo-woo site (http://www.fortunecity.com/tinpan/trumpetavenue/134/earth1.htm). They got their lost continents wrong too. It's Mu that was in the Pacific. Lemura was in the Indian Ocean.

Anyways that's not the issue at hand. Something strikes me as not right with the waterline on the Sphinx claim, espeically being unable to find something on it.

Can anybody provide me sources/information? (Of course there's not going to be studies on why there's no waterline if there's not reason for any.)


Try the search term: sphinx water erosion

HERE (http://www.google.com/search?q=sphinx+water+erosion&btnG=Search&hl=en&lr =&ie=ISO-8859-1)

The Bad Astronomer
2005-Feb-27, 05:52 PM
If you add the word "debunk" or "csicop" to that search you are more likely to get real answers.

Here (http://www.csicop.org/si/9909/fox.html), or here (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5727486) for example.

Brady Yoon
2005-Feb-27, 05:56 PM
I was an avid believer of this theory (and that the Pyramids were built by aliens, but that's another story. :) ) However, this theory does have some water in it I think. It's worth looking into. The one thing I think weakens the argument is that the Sphinx looks just like the Egyptian pharaohs.

kucharek
2005-Feb-27, 06:37 PM
I was an avid believer of this theory (and that the Pyramids were built by aliens, but that's another story. :) ) However, this theory does have some water in it I think. It's worth looking into. The one thing I think weakens the argument is that the Sphinx looks just like the Egyptian pharaohs.

My sister is an Egyptologist and she is as tired of these woo-woo-theories on old Egypt as most of us here are tired of wwo-woo-theories on Planet X, the Moonhoax and doomsdays.

Harald

W.F. Tomba
2005-Feb-27, 10:51 PM
I was an avid believer of this theory (and that the Pyramids were built by aliens, but that's another story. :) ) However, this theory does have some water in it I think. It's worth looking into. The one thing I think weakens the argument is that the Sphinx looks just like the Egyptian pharaohs.
And like other, smaller sphinxes, which the Egyptians apparently built all over the place.

Captain Kidd
2005-Feb-28, 01:48 AM
Thanks guys, my googling sense was off a few points. Having just completed 7 hours in a hospital surgery waiting room while the wife was under the knife (nasal work) dulled me pretty good. (I did manage to plow all the way thorough To Your Scattered Bodies Go during that time though.)

Sam5
2005-Feb-28, 04:30 AM
I have no opinon about the age of the sphinx. I was just providing CK with better search terms.

beskeptical
2005-Feb-28, 08:54 AM
My sister is an Egyptologist and she is as tired of these woo-woo-theories on old Egypt as most of us here are tired of wwo-woo-theories on Planet X, the Moonhoax and doomsdays.

HaraldI can understand your sister's reaction, but the geologist that said there was evidence of water erosion on the sphinx presented a pretty good case. It wasn't like the typical woowoo that has distorted scientific evidence or no evidence at all to support their claims.

We're talking erosion here, not water marks that I think the OP was talking about.

Back to the science, the geologist did not say his evidence outweighed everyone elses. He didn't offer an explanation why there has yet to be discovered any evidence of a more ancient Egyptian society that might have built the sphinx. But at the same time, Egyptologists can't explain the water erosion pattern on the sphinx either. I see no reason either of these two science fields should be dismissing the evidence of the other. They need to leave the question open until a plausible explanation for the discrepancy emerges.

As to the fact the sphinx looks a certain way, it could have been modified. I think that is accepted theory anyway. And whether there are additional sphinxes in Egypt, that wouldn't preclude the main sphinx being older than currently believed. There are ruins in Africa that show sophisticated societies that were discounted by European anthropologists until recently. And there are always potential new discoveries that could change accepted anthropological assumptions.

Fram
2005-Feb-28, 10:07 AM
There are ruins in Africa that show sophisticated societies that were discounted by European anthropologists until recently. And there are always potential new discoveries that could change accepted anthropological assumptions.

What ruins and societies are you talking about? And how recently?
I mean, something like Zimbabwe is accepted already for quite a while. Phoenician cities in South Africa on the other hand aren't (sorry, that was a very bad Clive Cussler book, #-o ). :lol:

beskeptical
2005-Feb-28, 10:33 AM
There are ruins in Africa that show sophisticated societies that were discounted by European anthropologists until recently. And there are always potential new discoveries that could change accepted anthropological assumptions.

What ruins and societies are you talking about? And how recently?
I mean, something like Zimbabwe is accepted already for quite a while. Phoenician cities in South Africa on the other hand aren't (sorry, that was a very bad Clive Cussler book, #-o ). :lol:Here's a good site (http://www.homestead.com/wysinger/ancientafrica.html) to start from as it has links to all sorts of other sites. I saw a travel documentary following a black news guy, I'll have to hunt for a link, as he traveled to African sites and related some of the historical events like European anthropologists ignoring the evidence that Africans had any advanced civilization despite the obvious ruins he was filming. I think the ignoring was in the early part of the 20th century, not something recent or ongoing.

Fram
2005-Feb-28, 11:47 AM
There are ruins in Africa that show sophisticated societies that were discounted by European anthropologists until recently. And there are always potential new discoveries that could change accepted anthropological assumptions.

What ruins and societies are you talking about? And how recently?
I mean, something like Zimbabwe is accepted already for quite a while. Phoenician cities in South Africa on the other hand aren't (sorry, that was a very bad Clive Cussler book, #-o ). :lol:Here's a good site (http://www.homestead.com/wysinger/ancientafrica.html) to start from as it has links to all sorts of other sites. I saw a travel documentary following a black news guy, I'll have to hunt for a link, as he traveled to African sites and related some of the historical events like European anthropologists ignoring the evidence that Africans had any advanced civilization despite the obvious ruins he was filming. I think the ignoring was in the early part of the 20th century, not something recent or ongoing.

All right, thanks!

Captain Kidd
2005-Mar-02, 03:34 AM
Well that went fairly easy. The main thing being they though it had a waterline eroded into it like it was flooded up to a certain level for an extended period of time.

So I pointed out that this West guy's arguments are focused on vertical cracks and their argument (based off a secondhand reference to West) was for horizontal marks. (Not to mention their position was a flood-based and his is rain-based erosion.) That pretty much caused their position to crack. (he, he)

It went rather easy and painless.

Now if only I could get them straight on chemtrails, 9/11, number of earthquakes increasing, HAARP, yadda, yadda, yadda. Thankfully not Apollo. I'd say something about be careful what you marry into but that got deflated after a cousin went into a lengthly explanation of how he's figured out how to stick it to the electric company. He's going to build a pond on top of a hill, run a pipe to a generator, use some of the generated electricity to pump the water back up the hill and back into the pond and run his house, barn, few miles of electric fence, etc. off the rest. ](*,)