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View Full Version : Should Banks etc go back to dial up connections?



WaxRubiks
2017-Jul-03, 08:43 PM
Would it e possilble for modern broadband modems to connect directly to bank system, and supermarket systems etc?

Would it be more secure?

schlaugh
2017-Jul-03, 10:05 PM
At the old dial up speeds??? I can't see how. The overwhelming amount of data would drown any dial up technology in modern B2B transactions. Maybe for a few critical systems but even then...

That said...you said "broadband modems" but the thread title is "dial up connections". Could you please clarify? And how do you mean "secure"?


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Buttercup
2017-Jul-03, 10:39 PM
Would it e possilble for modern broadband modems to connect directly to bank system, and supermarket systems etc?

Would it be more secure?

I don't know.

But I will say that hospitals and clinics should maintain some level of PAPER chart on every patient admitted / seen within a year's time. Containing basic info (surgeries, allergies, current meds) ... with ability to add VIA HANDWRITING in case of malware attack.

Might save a life. Going strictly digital with medical is foolish!

We're nearly 1 week out from malware attack and still quite crippled.

WaxRubiks
2017-Jul-03, 11:03 PM
At the old dial up speeds??? I can't see how. The overwhelming amount of data would drown any dial up technology in modern B2B transactions. Maybe for a few critical systems but even then...

That said...you said "broadband modems" but the thread title is "dial up connections". Could you please clarify? And how do you mean "secure"?


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Well I was just wondering if modern modems could access different systems; connect with a bank directly, somehow. I suppose that people could have a seperate dialup machine to access a different network, for secure stuff, using a computer that wouldn't likely have any malware on it.

And by secure, I was meaning safe from maleware extracting bank passwords etc.

I'm not very knowledable of these things. :)

Solfe
2017-Jul-03, 11:34 PM
Well I was just wondering if modern modems could access different systems; connect with a bank directly, somehow. I suppose that people could have a seperate dialup machine to access a different network, for secure stuff, using a computer that wouldn't likely have any malware on it.

And by secure, I was meaning safe from maleware extracting bank passwords etc.

I'm not very knowledable of these things. :)

If the business is using VOIP and only VOIP for service, old fashion modems won't be able to connect with them. They would have to go back to good old fashion telephone lines.

Dialup wouldn't make things more secure for being dialup, it would make things more secure because no one would want to use that machine for anything. Too slow.

schlaugh
2017-Jul-03, 11:49 PM
Keep in mind that a retail credit card transaction touches multiple systems, banks and networks. Sure, it "worked" in the dial up days but the accounts settlement took a while between your credit card company, the clearinghouse and the merchant. Now it's darned near instantaneous.


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01101001
2017-Jul-03, 11:55 PM
Well I was just wondering if modern modems could access different systems; connect with a bank directly, somehow.

Not all modems, which modulate and demodulate, are interoperable. You're thinking about two different kinds of modems. They share a name.


And by secure, I was meaning safe from maleware extracting bank passwords etc.

The malware is much more likely on the customer equipment.

swampyankee
2017-Jul-04, 03:04 PM
When my brother was first doing network management for a bank, they used modems which used non-standard protocols to make it more difficult. None of the IT professionals (as opposed to some of the MBAs in charge) thought that was a significant barrier, being analogous to hiding your key under the mat, vs just leaving the door unlocked.

Requiring banks to use strong encryption for all their transactions would be much better. They don't, but the reason gets into politics, not technology.

morose
2017-Jul-05, 03:08 PM
A dial-up modem? I haven't even had a dial-up line for more than a decade.

If I want to go to the bank in person, will I have to ride a horse?

WaxRubiks
2017-Jul-05, 03:29 PM
A dial-up modem? I haven't even had a dial-up line for more than a decade.

If I want to go to the bank in person, will I have to ride a horse?

I ride a penny farthing

publiusr
2017-Jul-07, 09:58 PM
If it were up to me--business would still do everything on paper--hack free.

Hypmotoad
2017-Jul-07, 10:44 PM
I had always heard quantum key encryption is supposed to be the bee's knees when it comes to security, whenever there is such a thing.

swampyankee
2017-Jul-07, 10:58 PM
I had always heard quantum key encryption is supposed to be the bee's knees when it comes to security, whenever there is such a thing.

It may be, but the law enforcement and counter-terrorism communities have repeatedly objected to strong encryption in private hands.

slang
2017-Jul-08, 07:06 AM
If it were up to me--business would still do everything on paper--hack free.

Yeah! Because there was absolutely no fraud whatsoever before the evil computer was invented.

UntrainedObserver
2017-Jul-08, 10:16 AM
I don't know.

But I will say that hospitals and clinics should maintain some level of PAPER chart on every patient admitted / seen within a year's time. Containing basic info (surgeries, allergies, current meds) ... with ability to add VIA HANDWRITING in case of malware attack.

Might save a life. Going strictly digital with medical is foolish!

We're nearly 1 week out from malware attack and still quite crippled.
What you're looking for is not paper in and of itself, but redundancy: a secondary, emergency system (digital or otherwise) separated from the main one.
It's exceptionally difficult, time consuming and expensive to build a robust redundant system, especially if we are talking about a redundant bureaucratic system.....

gzhpcu
2017-Jul-08, 12:07 PM
The bank I use offer ebanking via the internet. The client is provided with a small stand-alone card computer. When you sign in, you have to provide your contract number and are given a 6 digit numeric code (changes everytime). The client enters his personal code to unlock the card computer, then enters the 6 digit number, which then maps it onto a 6 digit alphanumeric code. This is then entered to login. The line has strong encryption. Seems pretty safe to me...

Noclevername
2017-Jul-08, 01:05 PM
"Blockchain will make us all perfectly secure forever", bitcoin enthusiasts assure us.

swampyankee
2017-Jul-08, 02:32 PM
If it were up to me--business would still do everything on paper--hack free.

Given how long medical records need to be kept, and how many can be generated, this was problematic decades ago. The paper hospital records of my aunts, who had a serious eating disorder, took up several dozen feet of space in filing cabinets.